Skip to main content

Full text of "Minutes of the organization of the Liberty Baptist Association"

See other formats


WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




1901-1910 



NOT TO BE CIRCULATED 





Digitized by 


the Internet Archive 






in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/minutesoforganiz0110libe 



MINUTES 



OF THIS 



:Sixty-Eighth Annual Session: 



OF 



Liberty Baptist Association 





HELD WITH 



LEXINGTON CHURCH, 
August, 20 th, 2 1 st and 22d, J90J. 





>'■. ' * ■ ' ■ 




MINUTES 



OF THE 



Sixty-Eighth Annual Session 



OF 



Liberty Baptist Association 



HEED WITH 



LEXINGTON CHURCH, 
August, 20th, 21st and 22d, J 90 1. 



Officers of the Association : 



Moderator : James Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk : Elder Henry Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer : S. H. Averitt, Thomasville, N. C. 



Time Place and Preacher For Next Session : 

The next session of Liberty Association will meet with the church at 
Lick Creek, on Tuesday before the fourth Sunday in August, 1902. 
Introductory sermon by Elder Henry Sheets. Alternate: Elder Jeff Lanning 



6?3«-<t 
I 9o/ - /<//& 



List of Ordained Ministers in Liberty Association, Aug, 1901* 

Adderton, W. S Denton, N. C. 

Boone, J. B Thomasville, N. C. 

Carrick, Thos High Point, N. C. 

Harris, Lee W El Dorado, N. C. 

Henderson, G. W Blaine, N. C. 

Lancaster, J. F Oak Ridge, N. C. 

Lanning. Jeff Denton, N. C. 

Leach, M. J Lassiter, N, C. 

Miller, John R Thomasville, N. C. 

Morton, H Thomasville. N. C. 

Newton, J. D Thomasville, X. C. 

Orrell, N. B Abbott's Creek, N. C. 

Rich, W. H Lexington, N. C. 

Sheets, Henry Lexington, N. C. 

Stoker, Ambrose P Denton, N. C. 

Summey, John A Hannersville, N. C. 

Thomas, C. A. G Thomasville, N. C. 



Executive Board* 

John R. Miller, Chairman ; James Smith, Wm. Bovvers, J. C. Bean, C. M. 
Wall. 



Proceedings 



Lexington Church, August 20, 1901, 

Liberty Association convened with this church to-day in its 
Sixty-Eighth Annual Session. Religious exercises were conducted 
by Dr. R. T. Vann, of Raleigh. On motion of Elder J. B. Boone 
the preaching of the Annual Sermon was postponed till 
to-night at 8:00 o'clock. 

The Moderator appointed brethren J. M. Hilliard and R. 3. 
Green, Jr., as Reading Clerks, after which, proceeded to the 
enrollment of Messengers : 

Abbott's Creek— C. H. Teague and D. D. Orrell. 

Center Cross— Not represented. 

Denton— H. C. Tysinger. 

El Dorado— By letter. 

Holloways — H. J. Palmer. 

Huldah— By letter. 

Jackson's Creek— Not represented. 

Jersey— Z. T. Sharpe, L. A. Smith and J. D. Palmer. 

Kernersville— J. F. Lancaster. 

Lexington — John D. Holt, G. Foster Hankins and A. A. 
Yarbrough. 

Liberty — D. H. Hepler, D. M. Summey and D. T. Andrews. 

Lick Creek — Not represented. 

Maple Spnngs— Not represented. 

Marion — R. S. Grttn, Sr., and C. S. Green. 

Mt. Lebanon — By letter. 

New Friendship — S. A. Hege. 

Oak Hill —Not represented. 

Orphanage — J. B. Boone, A. Johnson and S. H. Averitt. 
Pine M. House — J. H. Feezor and O. T. Davis. 
Piney Grove — E. B. Fitzgerald. 
Pleasant Fork—Not represented. 

Reed's X Roads— C. H. Fritts, A. E. Myers and H. V. 
Myers. 

Rich Fork — Wm. Bowers and R. S. Green, Jr. 



WAKE fOREST UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 



4 

Stoner's Grove— t,. C. Lomax, T. I. Wafford and B. F. 
Roach. 
Suminerville — By letter. 
Thomasville — H. Morton. 

On motion it was agreed to adjourn the morning service at 
12:00 M. 

Adjourned till 2:00 o'clock P. M. 

Afternoon Session. 

The body went into election of officers for the ensuing year, 
which resulted as follows : 
Moderator : James Smith. 
Clerk : Henry Sheets. 
Treasurer : S, H. Averitt. 

An invitation was extended to visiting brethren. The follow- 
ing accepted seats : 

Elder C. J. Woodson, of the King's Mountain; Brother S. 
Beeker, of the South Yadkin Association; Elder J M. Bennett, 
representing the North Carolina Baptist; E^der J. W. Cobb, 
travelling agent of the Biblical Recorder; Dr. R. T. Vann, of 
Central Association and President of the Baptist Female Univer- 
sity, and Elder Livingston Johnson. Corresponding Secretary 
North Carolina Baptist State Convention. 

The following named brethren were appointed to report at 
tnis session : 

On Arrangements — J. B. Boone, S. E. Hege and Z. T. 
Sharpe. 

On Place and Preacher For Next Association — John R. Miller 
S. A. Hege and H. J. Palmer. 

On Finance —John R. Miller and D. T. Andrews. 

io Name Executive Committee — D. H. Hepler, John A. Sam- 
mey and A. A. Yarbrough. 

To report next year : 

On State Missions— R. S Green, Jr., and A. E- Myers. 
On Home Missions — Wm. Bowers and D. T. Andrews. 
On Foreign Missions — W, H. Rich and C. H. Teague. 
On Periodicals — J. D. Newton and O. E. Stoner. 



s 

On Education — J. M. HilHard and L. G. Lewis. 
On Baptist Orphanage — J. B. Boone and H. Morton. 
On Sunday Schools — Jeff Lanning and O. T. Davis. 
On Minister' Relief— C. A. G. Thomas and H. C. Tysinger. 
On Temperance — G. Foster Hankins and J. H. Feezor. 
Bro. J D. Boone, chairman of Committee, made the following 
report 

On Arrangment : 
Tuesday, 8 p. m., Sermon. 

Wednesday, August 21st, Religious Exeicises, 9:00 to 9:30 
a. m. 

1. Routine Business, 9:3c to 10:00 a. m. 

2. Periodicals, 10:00 to 10:30 a. m. 

3 State Missions. 10:30 to 11:30 a m. 
4. Orphanage, 11:30 to 12:30 p. m. 
6. Foreign Missions, 2:30 to 3:30 p. m. 
6, Miscellaneous, 3:30 to 4:00 p. m. 

Thursday, August 22d, Religious Exercises 9:00 to 9.30 a. m. 
1. Routine Business, 9:30 to 10:00 a. m. 
2 Sunday Schools, 10:00 to 10:40 a. m. 

3. Home Missions, 10:40 to 11:30 a. m. 

4. Temperance, 11:30 to 12:00 m. 
5 Miscellaneous, 12:00 m. 
Adjournment. 

On motion of Bro. John R. Miller, a committee of three was 
appointed to report on the feasibility of publishing a history of 
the Liberty Association. The Moderator appointed the com- 
mittee as follows: John R. Miller, S. A. Hege and Henry 
Sheets. 

After a song, adjourned. 

Benediction by Elder J. W. Cobb. 

Night Session. 
In accordance with a former motion, Elder C. A. G. Thomas 
preached, a strong and helpful sermon from Eph. 4:16. 
Benediction by Elder J. B. Boone. 

Morning Session, Wednesday, August 22. 
Religious exercises were conducted by Elder J. F. Lancaster. 
Moderator Smith called the body to order. Minutes of yester- 
day read and approved. Elder Hilliard read the 



6- 

Report on Periodicals. 

This is a reading age ^ur people, both old and young-, are 
reading all sorts of hooks — and, perhaps, both good and bad — 
and, as Christian men and women, it is our duty to see that our 
own families and our n-ighbors have the best possible literature 
to read. Therefore, it is the duty of everv denomination to try 
to place its denominational paper in every family belonging to 
their churches Your committee would commend the Biblical 
Recorder, the endorsed organ of the Baptists of North Carolina, 
to every Baptist familv in our State as a piper worthy of a place 
in every household, full of good news and information ev^ry 
week from the different parts of the State, and just such infor- 
mation about our work in general as ^verv Baptist should know. 
We would command the North Carolina Baptist to our brethren 
and sisters as a first-class paper, and especially its Temperance 
Department, which is doing so much to strengthen the cause of 
Temperance in our State. 

"Chari'cy and Children," the organ of our Orphanage, should 
go into every home, not only of the Baptist, but wherever men 
and women wish to know more of that pure and urds fi^d re- 
ligion before God and the Father 

We would not forget the "Church Worker," published in our 
own Association by Rev. H. Sheets, as a great helper in oui 
church work. 

The Foreign Mission Journal and the Home Field are indis- 
pensable io one who wishes to know of our denominational 
work in general. J. M. Hilliard. 

Remarks were submitted by J. W. Cobb, J M. Bennett and 
A. Johnson; after which the report was adopted. 

Report on State Missions. 

The work of the State Mission Board should appeal to us for 
a great many considerations. In addition to the evangilization 
of the whole State which is the first and greatest work, and 
which is. white to harvest. The board has undertaken to reach 
the children who have never had a chance with the light of 
education. A work of wonderful importance is now in progress 
in Western North Carolina through the State Missionaries 
who labor there, but especially through the active and devoted 
sacrifice and labor of fifty young wom-n who have given 
from six weeks to two months, free of charge, to school work in 
remote neighborhoods this summer. A mighty sentiment in 
favor of general education has bten awakened that will bear 



7 



rich fruit in corning years. 

But above all the chi^f business of this board is to brine men to 
a knowledge of the truth ; to establish the cause of Christ where 
it is weak, to strengthen the points and in every possible way 
uphold and defend the principles upon which our churches rest. 

This is a vast lield. The great easr along the Atlantic shore 
where whole counties have hardly one Baptist chutch, the teem- 
ing Piedmont region where the factory problem cries aloud for 
solution and where helpless children are together at night worn 
out with the toil of the long day ; the wide west where we have 
too many organizuions but so little efficiency — all these clsims 
are being met by thr State Mission Board, to which we must 
look for the redemption of our dear old State, under the guiding 
hand of God. We commend the great work of the Board to all 
the churches and urge that they go forward in their pledges for 
the coming year. 

A. Johnson. 

This report was spoken to by Secretary Johnson and Henry 
Sheets, and at this juncture, on motion, the time was extended 
one-half an hour for the further consideration of this subject. 
The report was further spoken to by A. Johnson and L,. G. 
Lewis, after which pledges were taken and a cash collection 
amounting to $6 15 

On motion of Bro. W. H. Rich, it was agreed to meet at 7 
p. m. to spend one hour in prayer in behalf of a revival of re- 
ligion and for God's blessing upon our work. 

Bro. William Bowers read the 

Repobt on Baptist Orphanage. 

The Orphanage at Thotuasville is an institution of the Bap- 
tists of our State, and .^kuated so near the center of our Associa- 
tion that there is but little excuse for anyone of our number to 
be unacquainted with its needs, its management, etc But we 
fear that quite a number of us know less of this institution than 
our duty requires. 

There were two hundred and ten children supported by the 
hand of charity. Were you among the number that contributed 
to their support? If not, we hope you will fall in line and help 
to run this God-given work. 

We think God-given — 

First — Because we believe that the very site on which the 
Orphanage is situated was tormed by the Lord himself for the 



8 



very purpose for which it is being used. 

The hills covered with white sands, the springs and the rills 
between them bespeak the purpose of Gofl in this formation. 

Second — The evidence that we have that the Lord's hand has 
been in the work from its infancy up to the present. 

Last year was its best year — more contributions, more done in 
a general way, than in any previous year — which we are thank- 
ful for. We hope the coming year will be equally as good, or 
better. We are pleased with the present management. The 
wisdom and economy used speaks well for the General Manager; 
not only so, but for the matrons, teachers, etc. The cost of an 
orphan's support and training was only $4.38. With this they 
were not only fed and clothed, but they had the advantage of 
good schools, and their religious interest is looked w j ll after. 
The most of these children give their hearts to the Lord while 
at the Orphanage. The work at the Orphanage is systematic, 
and can not we be more systematic in our giving to this noble 
cause now, with our prayers and increased contri^ u ions, and 
the good work will go on, Respectful y submitted, 

William Bowers. 
John A Summey. 

This very excellent report was ably discussed by Elders John 
R. Miller, L. Johnson and C. A. G. Thomas. 
Bro. John R, Miller read the 

Report on Foreign Missions. 

The gospel of Jesus Christ had its origin in Foreign Missions. 
It was planned in Heaven, in the eternal councils of the divine 
God, and Jesus Christ, the sent one. came as the missionary to 
bring the glad tidings to the children of men. 

And when He had finished his mission on earth and was ready 
to go back to the Father, He told His disciples to go into all the 
world and preach His gospel to every creature. Also in His 
farewell talks with His disciples, just before His ascension He 
said to them: "As my Father hath sent me even so I send you." 
Then as Christ was sent by the Father, even so we are sent by 
Christ to carry His gospel to every creature. 

Nothing is more emphasized in all His word than this work 
of carrying the gospel to others: Now do we, as His professed 
followers, love Him ? If so He says, we will keep His com- 
mandments. 

Then how much are we to love God ? With all thy soul, all 
thy mind and all thy strength. Now can we claim to show to 



9 



Him this degree of love by our gifts to foreign missions ? 

Brethren, if the Lord Jesus Christ now stood visibly in our 
midst, as He does in the spirit, could we look upon Him and 
tell Him we love Him, in the face of what we are doing to carry 
out His last commands ? 

No, brethren, we would be conpelled to confess, with shame, 
that we have not done what we could, or what we should, to 
show our love to Him who brought us the message of peace, 
light and life. 

It is true, we are doing something, our board is advancing a 
little each year, but as yet, we are only in the beginning of the 
great work of giving the gospel to the world. There are many 
millions of people on earth to-day, who have never heard the 
message which Jesus told us to carry to them. And whoi will 
be responsible, as God's watchman, for those who die in their 
sins, unwarned, without God, and without hope in the world? 

It is true, brethren, we are feeling our responsibilities Send- 
ing the gospel is Christ's command and we have n3 right of 
choice in regard to this matter. We have just as much right to 
neglect baptism, the Lord's supper, or any other command, as 
we have to neglect giving to missions. And also, we want to 
emphasize the fact, that our churches have just as much scrip- 
tural right to receive and retain within *heir fellowship, members 
who have never been baptized, as they have to retain within 
their fellowship members who do nothing for the spread of the 
gospel. We would recommend that Jihe pastors and churches 
seek to get a contribution to Foreign Missions from every mem- 
ber of the church and if there be those who are not able, 
brethren help them to give. 

This report was spoken to by Brethren John R. Miller L. 
Johnson and others. Adopted- 
Through Elder J. F, Lancaster, Kerneisville church made 
application for a letter of dismission from this body, to join the 
Pilot Mountain Association, which was duly granted. 
Bro John R. Miller read the following: 

Report of Committee on Place and Preacher- 

Your committee would recommend that the next session of 
this body be held with Lick Creek Church, beginning on Tues- 
day before the fourth Sunday in August, 1902. Introductory 
sermon, Elder H. Sheets. Alternate, Elder Jeff Lanning. 

S. A. Hege, 
H. J. Palmer, 
Jno. R. Miller, 
Adopted. Committee. 



TO 

Appointment of delegates. 

To Southern Baptist Convention: 

C. M. Wall ; alternate, Elder W. H. Rich. 

To the North Carolina State Convention: 

John D. Holt, S. A. Hege and H. Morton ; alternates, H. F. 
Motsinger, R. S. Green, Jr., and Jeff fanning. 

By vote of this body, Bro. C. M. Wall was appointed the asso- 
ciational representative on the Board of State Missions 

On motion of W. H. Rich, it was agreed to meet to-night at 
7:30 to hold prayer service for the L,ord\s blessing upon our 
work. 

Adjourned. Benediction. 

Night Session, August 2ist. 
After prayer service, Bro. S. H. Averitt read the 

Report on Education. 

A new era has dawned. North Carolina is wakin? up to the 
deplorable condition of her children whose only chance lies in 
the free schools which for the most part do not deserve to be 
called schools at all. 

The Baptist denomination ought to feel a deeper interest in 
popular education than any other people because a majority of 
the children of the State are in Baptist homes. We rejoice at 
the growing sentiment in favor of universal education among 
our people. It is high time we were awakening out of our long 
slumber. We rejoice at the growth of As^ociational schools in 
the State, and most of all at the large number of boys and girls 
they have gathered in. We are under the highest obligation to 
give all possible moral support to all these schools. 

THE CENTURY FUND. 

The Baptist State Convention last December resolved *o try to 
raise the sum of one hundred thousand dollars for education. 
Twenty-five thousand dollars to be first appropriated to the 
Baptist Female University, the balance to be divided between 
Wake Forest College and the ^howan Baptist Female Institute 
and the academies under denominational control. 

It is hoped that bv the division of the plan proposed, after the 
first $25,000 to the University, that all our educational interests 
will be uplifted and strengthened and the development of our 
people (which, after all, is the main thing desired) will be nor- 



1 1 

inal and natural, and not one-sided. 

We commend the movement to all our churches, and hope 
they will make a great offering in this the first vear of the new 
century. Respectfully submitted, 

S. H. Ayeritt, 
A. E. Myers, 

Committee. 

Brethren S. H. Averitt and Dr. R. l\ Vann discussed this 
excellent report- At the close a public collection was taken in 
behalf of the Baptist Female University amounting to $8.32. 

Adjournment. Benediction by B. W. Spillman. 

Morning session, August 22. 

Religious exercises were conducted by Elder H. Morton. 
The Moderator called the body to order. 

The committee on the publication of a history of the Liberty 
Association made the following 

REPORT. 

We, the committee appointed on publishing a history of Lib- 
erty Association, beg to submit the following, viz.: We believe 
that the publication and preservation of our history as a denom- 
ination is a matter of vital importance and should receive our 
hearty support. Therefore, we would recommend that our pas- 
tors and lriends use every effort to secure the sale of a sufficient 
number of copies to defray the expenses in the publication of 
this work, and make such report as they may see fit at our next 
session of our Association. J. R. Miller, 

H. Sheets, 
S. A. Hege, 

Committee. 

Remarks on the above report were made by John R. Miller, 
Henry Sheets, J. D. Newton and W. H. Rich ; after which Bro, 
Henry Sheets was asked to prepare the manuscript for a history. 

That a committee of three be appointed by this association to 
act with W . H. Rich in arranging for the campaign of education, 
known as the Century Campaign. 

The Moderator appointed the following brethren to co-operate 
with W. H. Rich, as chairman ; John R. Miller, J. M. Hilliard 
and John A. Summey. 

By motion the amount of money on the Century Fund col- 



12 



lected in this association be given to th? B. F. University, unless 
otherwise ordered by giver. 

Report on Sunday Schools. 

Last year's minutes show that there are 1549 persons enlisted 
in the Sunday schools of the Liberty Association. Tn^ same 
minutes show that there are 2287 members of churches in our 
bounds. The number of church members engaged in Sunday 
school work may be put at half tne number of those attending 
Sunday school, which would be 775. According to this it may 
be said that about one-third of the members of our churches are 
attending our Sunday schools. Bro. Spiltnan says that this is 
about the average in most of the associations of our State and 
some other States. 

Half the churches of the South report no Sunday school. The 
Sunday school work is coming to be recognized as second to 
none. The Sunday School Board of the Southern Convention 
his arranged for a Sunday school professorship in our Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Louisville. This will afford an opportunity for 
our preachers to secure the very best instructions in tnis line of 
work. 

We have in the Sunday school Board at Nashville one of the 
finest business institutions in the land — a good building, well lo- 
cated, paying expenses of all departments and a surplus of $44,000. 
Their periodicals and lesson helps of various kinds are equal to 
the bett, and a number of books have been published which 
have been widely circulated and read. Colportage. and Bible 
distribution is also an important feature in the work of the 
Board. 

The field department, under the direction of Bro. B. W. Spil- 
man, is being pushed vigorously in the direction of organizing 
Sunday schools, increasing i iterest and attendance in those 
already established. 

The needs of the work are a deeper and more prayerful study 
of the Bible, better teaching and more visiting in the interest of 
the Sunday School. Better reports are necessary, too, before 
accurate information can be had about the general Sunday 
school work. 

Three things to do: 1. Contribute to Sunday school work in 
North Carolina. 2. Contribute to Bible work of Sunday School 
Board at Nashville. 3. Send orders for literature to Baptist 
Book Store Raleigh, N. C. J. D. Newton. 

This repont was discussed by J. D. Newton, B. W. Spiltnan 

and W. H. Rich. 



13 



The following amendment was adopted, viz : 

That a committee of three be appointed to arrange for a Sun- 
day school Institute to be. held within the bounds of this associa- 
tion, viz , R. S. Green, Jr., J. D. Newton and Jeff Lanning. 

Bro. R. S. Green, Jr., read the 

Report on Home Missions. 

Our object in Home Missions is 1o give the Gospel to destitute 
sections of the Southern States that cannot be reached by State 
or Foreign Missions. Our own State has been receiving help 
from the Home Board for many years. We deem no object more 
important and more worthy or our support than Home Missions. 
The truth, as we hold it, has been established In many of our 
Southern cities, and many strong churches have b?en built as a 
result of the work of this Board, that are doing much to spread 
the kingdom of our blessed Redeemer all over the world. We 
may look more especially to the Home Board than to any other 
for the maintenance and propagation of the true doctrines of the 
Gospel, This Board lays strong claims upon us, and there is 
every reason why we should increase our contribuiion and give 
it our hearty support. Within the bounds of the home field there 
are over 12,000,000 unconverted souls, and this number is 
grower larger every year because of immigration into this section 
of our country. The field is large, the work is abundant and 
exceedingly important. 

We therefore recommend enlargement in our pledges to Home 
Missions. 

May the Lord's blessing and prosperity attend the work of 
this Board and the men employed under it. 

J. M. Bennett, 
S. E. Wafford. 
Bro. J. C. Caddell, Vice President of Home Missions in 
North Carolina, spoke to this report. Pledges taken and report 
adopted. 

Elder Jeff fanning read: 

Report on Temperance. 

Intemperance is one of the greatest evils that threatens the 
prosperity of our churches and country. Therefore we would 
recommend that our churches do all they can to rid themselves 
of this great evil. We hope the time will soon come when our 
churches will soon exclude from their membership every mem- 
ber who has anything to do with it in any way. 

Jeff Lanning. 



i 4 

Remarks on this report by Elder fanning. Report adopted. 
The following was offered; 

Resolved, That the Liberty Association are heartily in sym- 
pathy with the object of the Minister's Relief Board and com- 
mend this work to all our churches 

This work was discussed by W. H. Rich and afteward 
adopted. 

Report of Committee on Finance* 



■3.5P 

<U TO 



ft 



Pine M, House 

Holloways 

Liberty 

Mt. Lebanon... 
Summervillle . 

Jersey 

Marion 

El Dorado 

Stoner's Grove 
Abbott's Creek 

Lexington 

Denton 

Piney Grove. . 

Orphanage 

Kernersville ... 
Thomasville ... 

Rich Fork 

Reed's 

Friendship 

Oak Hill 

Lick Creek 



2 30 

1 73 
45 
55 
30 

2 00 
20 
40 

1 15 

2 00 

3 00 
1 00 
1 60 
1 5o 

85 
5o 
1 05 
1 22 
1 60 
32 
1 5o 



1 00 
1 00 
7 00 

40 
1 00 

50 

35 



10 00 
70 
75 

3 °o 

1 00 



8 57 



1 50 



2 00 
2 00 



50 



3 00 
1 00 

50 
7 00 



4 00 
2 00 



1 5o 



1 5o 
50 
50 

5 19 

70 

3 5o 
5 00 
1 00 



1 50 

1 5o 

2 10 



1 00 
6 00 
1 00 

50 
14 28 



2 00 



25 22 



11 25 



24 46 



5 60 



19 00 



21 49 



22 78 



Rich Fork Ch urch paid lor S. S. M. $1.04. 



John R. Miller, j Com 



D. T. Andrews, 
Treasurer's Report. 

AMOUNT RECEIVED. 

Home Missions -From Finance Committee and Churches $ 66 63 

State Missions - From Finance Committee and Churches 179 74 

Foreign Missions — From Finance Committee and Churches 108 41 

Seminary — Lexington Church 5 16 

Education -Finance Committee and Churches 100 43 

Minute Fund —Finance Committee 25 00 

Minister's' Relief — Finance Committee and Churches 27 61 

Ministerial Education — Churches and Association 18 72 



Total 



$53i 70 



15 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Home Missions — To Convention Treasurer $ 66 63 

State Missions — To Convention Treasurer and Missionaries of Liberty 

Association 179 74 

Foreign Missions -To Convention Treasurer 10S 51 

Seminary 5 J 6 

Education — To O. L. Stringfield, Financial Secretary 100 43 

Minute Fund To Rev. Henry Sheets 25 00 

Minister's Relief Fund— To Couveniion Treasurer 27 61 

Ministerial Education — To Conveution Treasurer 18 72 



Total $53 1 7o 

S. H. AneriTT, Treasurer. 

The Woman's Missionary Society, of Lexington Baptist Church, 
paid during the past year the following amounts : 

Foreign Missions - $7 00 

Home Missions 6 00 

State Missions - 7 00 

Xmas Offering 2 15 

Expense Fnnd - - 36 



Total $22 51 



Mrs. W, H. Rich, Presideut. 
Miss Roxik Sheets, Sec. & Treas. 

In addition to the above the ladies of the church have col 
lected and paid $151.17 towards furnishing the church. 

The Woman's » issionary Society, of Holloway's Church has 
paid for Foreign Missions $1 10 

Mrs. M. E Peters, President. 
Mrs. Viola Cross, Sec. 

On motion, the Clerk was authorized to superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and that he be allowed $10.00 for his 
services. 

Bro. R. S. Green, Jr., offered the following : 

We, the delegates of Liberty Association, in session, hereby 
return our sincere thanks to the brethren and sisters of the 
Lexington Church and community for their hospitality in their 
care of us during this session. 

After singing "God be with you till we meet again," and 
and prayer by Bro. W. H. Rich, the Association adjourned to 
meet with the church at Lick Creek on Tuesday before the 
fourth Sunday in August, 1902. 

James Smith, Moderator. 

Henry Sheets, Secretary. 



16 



Table of Pledges for J90M902, 



CHURCHES. 



Oh 
U 

O 



"0 

I § 



Abbott's Creek. _ 

Center Cross 

Denton 

El Dorado 

Holloway's 

Huldah 

Jackson's Creek. 

Jersey 

Kernersville 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek . 

Maple Springs __. 

Marion 

Mt. Lebanon 

New Friendship. 

Oak Hill 

Orphanage. 

Pine M House.. 

Piney Grove 

Pleasant Fork. 
Reed's X Roads. 

Rich Fork 

Stoner's Grove _ 

Summerville 

Thomasville 

Gravel Hill 

Talor's Grove 

Union Meeting 



IO 


00 


3 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


16 


00 


3 


5o 


44 


50 






1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 






5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


4 


00 


1 


50 


9 


00 


1 


00 


23 


00 


i 


00 






1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


9 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


3 


00 


57 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 




50 


1 


00 




00 


6 


00 






1 


00 


2 


00 


* 1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


8 


00 


18 


00 


6 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


'71 


00 


















10 


00 






10 


00 


50 


00 


16 


00 


36 


00 


15 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


'47 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


1 


50 


32 


50 


11 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


2 


00 


48 


00 


















1 


00 






1 


00 


1 


00 






1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 






5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 




50 


13 


50 


15 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


63 


00 






2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 






7 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


40 


00 


15 


00 


5o 


00 


3 


00 


183 


00 


11 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


39 


00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 


4 


00 


84 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


200 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


14 


00 


7 


00 


4 


50 


900 


2 


75 


15 


00 


2 


25 


40 


50 


3 


50 


2 


50 


3 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


1 


25 


18 


25 


2 


25 


1 


00 




15 


1 


00 


2 


20 


1 


00 


8 


60 


1 


00 


1 


00 




5o 








5o 




50 


4 


50 




00 






1 


00 






3 


00 






5 


00 










2 


00 




50 










2 


50 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


63 


00 


251 


75 


121 


50 


210 


15 


96 25 


287 70 


4i 


50 


1,008 85 



2 B b 
I B 3 



o ^ ™ P n 

73 o < o 

o i« c 

SO Pi . 75 

p. • : <T> 



r 3 a' J» 

B B 
CL O 

; w a 
: er 



a 
orq 

C/3 



B 

o <; 

B 



O 

o 

re 
n> 



o o 
2 « 
o 



2> 
3 o 

IT) 



co *-i 



n 
a 

7* 

n 
a 
to 

to 



*1 



3?P 



B C ft 

to td 
o o 



O 



3 3 
OOO 
w 5 h g < 

o n> rx> • . 



fr* 25 to 00 nj a 2; 2; 
o sr. " * • o • 

* 2 ■ B W P O T W 



r £.3 



75 



9? a 

is 

a. 

re 



rc Orq 



CO 
CO 

CO 
s 

C/5 



S £toO 

5* -t o o 
n> ffi 5? - 



a to'zi 73 

ft B ft 

B ES* 5 a 

BO 01 

o 



32 

e er 



on 



B CTQ 
c/J P 

©5* 
P 

B 



3 



to to p*ito 

ro X h 2 

* g s i 

o <j p- 

B £L* 



3 

o 



CO 
B 

o 



KJ Cn 00 00 Cn 



00 O <J\ On 



Offi'rsand 
Teachers. 



Cn On 00 
O O On O O 


"<t 



8^ 


OJ 4^ 
O Cn 


O) 

4^ Cn ^1 
On O O ON 


Cn ^4 O) kj 
Cn h cn 4^ 


Cn 


Scholars. 


Cn 4^ On 00 
N) Cn OJ GO Cn 


•vj 

On 


M tO 
M Oi 
M OA 


0> Cn 
Cn O 


Oi 

Cn 00--4 00 
O ON K) 


On*^1 4^ 0> 
O) ^4 O Cn 


00 




Total 

T'ch's and 
Schols. 


Co 
O 








O 
O 


ON 

00 




Vols, in 
Library. 


Cv) 4 s - Cn 4^ O 
O 00 Oo Cn O 


O 


M tO 

O 

O Cn 


o> 

O 


Co Co 
4^ O On 
On O O 00 


o> 

Co vJ 10 H 

Cn O On Cn 


Cn 
4^ 


Quart'lies 
and Pap'rs 
Taken. 


K> tO Oo Vl to 

P O O O O 

00 O O O 


00 





o> 

O 


Cn 

O On 
O O 


to 00*0 O 

O Cn m vO 
4^ •<! to <0 


m Cn m «<l 

O O On m 
O O m 


Cn 

O 
O 


School 
Expenses. 



j 8 



l'-V> r. 



*-> 

^ "J TJ ~ ~C t?4J "w *C ■<-> to 

On O <N O - 1 CO ci FF-aO - io rf tovO f^n tNtOM OnCO t^. l>» rj- O 

•t IN O 'OVD « O ^> " X iO f; •+ h M O vO " ^00 >0 f) 



iOCO O <N O^CO « 0>v£> rt On CO 
_ rr} -r O t^. <N VO CN w w CO 
CO 



•paiQ 



papnpxg 



VO T N h 



A"q 'SXQ 



•pajo;s9^ 



X MM ^) N 



* S 'J 55 25 
^ o ~ 

X 1 fcl O P )h 

q c w > 

£> p4 Q Hi -/) 



liii 

5 h O U 

3 p4 



.a cr 

CD T3 

42 



cfl 
0) 



CS>-/ cfl Cfl ,— « f j Cfl 

^ . ^ CO '-' .73 ^ ^ ^ -7 

CD „ a cu « Z <^ cu „ 

f .r; O+j rt fl £ Cfi 

o 9.3;£ £ <u 
p4 -^cn g p4 h ay co g 



a 



8.S 



2 £ 
a o 

2^ 



s S3 fc^-a 



<D o 

Cfl T— I 



W ^ <j ^ ^4 
o 



O ■ ■> 



BR 
a a : a 

u <l> si -a OJ <U <D 



cr, X ft 
(U 0) OJ 

^ ^^i^Q^ij 

a Z ^ 33 pq > ^ 6 ^ to 5? ^ ^ S 



.2^ 



5 aj 
en > 

O • 



c 2i 

03 S3 
S3 O 



CO ^ 



^ 8 



CU 

<5U 



o 

to 



o - : 

lllll 



bX 

^3 



g « CO 

lis 



o !zj g g g r r r 



WVp Xffi w o o > 

<t> - n> 

7? 



19 



_ 333-3- o g r$> 

» a? » ^ ^ a ™e • 

o £- 3 o ifi 5 »-» 



o 3r 



o 

^ 3 2 2 ^ c 3 5 

ft < rt-* 1 5 S.O 

« W O g ^3 J3* 



03>d • 

3 O § 



CD <T> - 



3300,,*30 

r+ r-f- 3 3t~ , 3 , "-»-3 
g 3 £3 £0 S-orq 3 

< <i 2 o 



rs ft 



JO ^ ^ 

(D • ~ 

< o I 

> B 



M CD fT> 

a 3 H 



w"3 

O crq 



5 o r o 2 



1 S.S 

rc rp p3 

2 r« 5 



»3 03 
cT 5' 



to 








to >- 4^ 
On Q 4> 


to C-) 




CO H 

On 4^ O ONCfi 







State 


8 


O O Cn Cn 
O C O Co 


O O to 
O O Co 


O 

O 




f*i r\ m r> Z 
OOOOOO 


8 io 8 





Missions. 


to 
10 




M 

so 4^ on 


On to 




On 4^ moj On 


m on m to 


Co 


Home 





O to 
O OvO 






O Co ON 

O - 


2 

O O 




O 4^ no C nf 
C O NO Co O -t 


O CO O Cm 
O Cm O O 


O 

c 


Missions. 


-0 
^1 

(O 

0> 


MUM 
Cn O Cn C 


Co 4^ 
O On CO 

O to O 
O 4^ NO 


O to 

8 8 


4^ 
On 


O O CO CO 

8 8 8 co 8 


H NO M 4- 

O C O Z 
OOOO 


CO 

8 


Foreign 
Missions. 


On 
Cn 




to 


H 

On 4^ O 


On m 




M 

Co Co hi on 


On to 


4^ 


Educat'n. 


10 


Cn Cn Oi Cn 
O0O0 


O On CO 


O O 
O O 




O O to 
O O to O 


^ 8 









CO 
CO 
Co 


to m to On On 


M M (0 
ON O 


CO 

Co 




to to 
O Cn Cn •<! Co 


M CO to Co 


ON 






*vl 


— Cm O to 
O O 4^ 




ON 


On O On 

c C 


88 


On 
On 


O O ^> SJ 

O CO 


O CO O ~ 

U NO O CO 


8 


Orph. 


Co 




(0 


Cn to Cn 


to 




-1 m Cn IO 


Co 1- 


Co 


Minister's 


4- 


Cfl Oi 







O C 4^ 
O O ON 


C On 
O C 




O On O O 

COO O 


O CO 





R. Fund. 


10 

ON 




(0 


to M 
Co — J 


-■J 4^ 




w \D M to 

~- ON O tO 


to 

On h w 




Incidents 


00 


-P^ to to 

O CCCn 






~ O 

co 


O ON 

ON O 




On On 
O 4^ O O 


O 
OOO 






On 

On 








Co 
On 




to 

O 
O 






Poor of 
v. hurch. 






















to 
■<» 

NO 

On 


On m 

Ov 

4s>. 




00 
Cn 

Co O 


8 




NO 

to M ~ 4^ ^1 

vO Cn On vO Cn 
M OOlvD O 

O Co ^0 


OJ 

On 

O 


to 
■^1 

to 
On 


Other 
Objects. 


CO 
On 
O 


-1 Co to On O 
to Cn O O 


O to 
O O Co 


t0 M 

On O 


O 


v)MCn hoi 
Oi On O On O 


O 

O On Cn 


O 


Pastor's 
Salaries. 


On 


On 

M O O O 






OOO 

O O c 


O O 
O 



O 


OOOOO 
OOOOO 


OOO 
COO 


O 

O 




10 
Cn 






N tO H 






H CO IO 




to 


Minute 


to 

10 


On Co >— c O 
O On In 


to 


OnCo On Co 

O O to 


On On 
C On 


to 



On 4^- O CO O 
On O Cn O 


^ 4^ O 
Co O O 







Fund. 


CO 




















Oj 

00 


to Co +_ COCn 
Cn On CO to to 


to to Co 
Co 4> 
4^ O O 


to 

On to 
to ~J 


to 


On m S3 O - 
tO — 1 Cn CO tO 


OnCo fc} 
4^. 4^. On4^ 


^4 
Co 


Totals. 


Co 


ONOn 4^ m 
COCn Co to 


to 


OnCo On Co 4^- On to 
OJOJ vj to -1 Cn 


co't) coco 

C On COCo O 


-n hh Co m 
O to O CO 


-J 

Cm 




Cn 


"O to On On 
OOOO 
OOOO 


8 s 




Cn On 

88 


to 

Co to 
4*. O 
On C 




On m _to 
to Co Cm O CO 

O ON O O O O 

OOOOOO 


nO 4^ CO 
OOO 
OOO 


O 

8 


Value 

of Church 


C 

c 


OOOO 

c c e 





8? 


O O 

c 




OOOOOO 

c c c 


8 8 8 


8 1 


1 roperty. 



a* 

r 



S 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Sixty-Ninth Annual Session 

of 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

BLEJLlD with 

LICK CREEK CHURCH. 
August 19th, 20th and 21st, 1902. 

DISPATCH PRINTING HOUSE, LEXINGTON, N. C. 



- 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Sixty-Ninth Annual Session 

OF 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

HELD WITH 

LICK CREEK CHURCH, 
August 19th, 20th and 21st, 1902. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION: 

Moderator— JAMES SMITH Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk— HENRY SHEETS..... Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer— S. H. AVERITT Thomas ville, N. C. 



Place, Time and Preacher for Next Session: 

The next session of Libert}' Association will convene with the 
Jersey church, one mile from Linwood station, on Tuesday after 
the third Sunday in August, 1903. 

The Introductory Sermon by Elder W. A. Smith : alternate, 
Elder John A. Sumraey. 



t 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS 

IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION AUGUST, 1902. 



ADDERTON, W. S.. Denton, N 

BOONE, J. B Thomasville, 

CARRICK, THOMAS High Point, 

LANNING, JEFF Denton, 

LEACH, M. J .' Lassiter, 

MILLER, JOHN R Thomasville, 

MORTON, H Thomasville, 

NEWTON, J. D , Thomasville. 

ORRELL, N. B Abbott's Creek, 

SHEETS, HENRY Lexington, 

SMITH, W. A Lexington, 

STOKER, A. P Denton, 

SUMMEY, JOHN A Hannersville, 



The following' named ordained ministers : Harris, Lee W., 
Henderson, G. W., have gone to the Montgomery; Lancaster, J. 
F., has gone to the Pilot Mountain ; Thomas, C. A. G., has gone 
to the Sandy Creek Association. Rich, W. H., to Southern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary. 



Executive Board* 

John R. Miller, James Smith, William Bowers, W. C. Roach, 

C. M. Wall. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Lick Creek Church, 

Davidson County, N. C, Aug. 19, 1902. 

Liberty Association convened with this church today 
in its sixty -ninth annual session. The Introductory Ser- 
mon was preached by Elder Henry Sheets from Acts 5:42. 
Adjourned for dinner. 

Afternoon. 

Religious exercises were conducted by Elder W. F. 

Fry. 

The Moderator called the body to order and the en- 
rollment of messengers was made as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — N R Teague and W D Spurgeon. 
Center Cross— By Letter. 
Denton — L A Ty singer. 

El Dorado— H A Henderson and W E Hall. 

Hollow ays — Peter Cross and J A Carriek. 

Huldah— By Letter. 

Jackson's Creek — Not represented. 

Jersey— W C Roach, W C Barnes and Z T Sharpe. 

Lexington— E M Ward. 

Liberty— Daniel M Summey and S H Kindley. 
Lick Creek— W P Redwine, James H Daniel and P Monroe 
Snider. 

Maple Springs— Not represented. 
Marion— By Letter. 
Mt. Lebanon— By Letter. 
New Friendship— By Letter. 
Oak Hill — Not represented. 
Orphanage — S H Averitt. 
Pine M. House— J. H. Beck. 
Piney Grove— By Letter. 
Pleasant Fork— Not represented. 

Reed's X Roads— A R Graver, Alexander Lanning and PA 
Myers. 

Rich Fork— William Bowers, J R Miller and S H Yokeley. 
STOKER'S Grove— B F Roach, L C Lomax and O L Stoner. 
Summers ville— Not represented . 
Thomasville— J T Valentine. 



/ 

4 LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



An invitation was extended to any new church desir- 
ing admission into this body. Letters were handed in 
from Taylor's Grove, Davidson, and Gravel Hill, Randolph 
county. On motion they were received and the Moderator 
extended the right hand of fellowship to the messengers. 

After the enrollment of messengers had been com- 
pleted, the body went into the election of officers, which 
resulted as follows : Moderator, James Smith ; Clerk, 
Henry Sheets ; Treasurer, S. H. Averitt. 

The Moderator then extended an invitation to visiting 
brethren. The following accepted seats : Elders J. F. 
Hodge, of the Stanley association, W. R. Cullom, for Board 
of Education, J . W. Cobb, of Biblical Recorder, W. F. Fry, 
for Baptist Female University, W. C. Newton, of Pied- 
mont association, for the Mission boards, G. W. Hen- 
derson, of the Montgomery association, and Bro. J. M. 
Stoner, of the Buncombe County association. 

The following committees were appointed to write re- 
ports for next session : 

On State Missions — J R Miller and A A Loflin. 
On Home Missions — J A Summey and W C Roach. 
On Foreign Missions— W A Smith and O L Stoner. 
On Periodicals — J D Newton and P M Snider. 
On Education — J M Hilliard and M J Leach. 
On Baptist Orphanage — S H Averitt and L G Lewis. 
On Sunday Schools— J T Valentyne and A H Michael. 
On Ministers' Relief — Henry Sheets and W C Barnes. 
On Temperance — N R Teague and Milton Denny. 

To report at this session : 

On Place and Preacher — S H Averitt, C M Wall, A R Graver. 
On Finance — William Bowers and J T Valentyne. 
To Name Executive Committee — Jeff Lanning,ZT Sharpe and J A 
Garrick. 

Announcements : Elder W. C. Newton will preach in 
this house tonight. Will meet tomorrow morning at 9:30. 
Spend half hour in religious exercises. 

Adjournment. Benediction. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



Service at Night. 

A congregation of considerable size met and Elder W. 

C. Newton preached a highly interesting sermon from 
Col. 1:15. 

, Tuesday Morning, August 20th. 

Religious exercises were conducted by Elder J. M. 
Hilliard, reading a part of 34th Psalm. 

Moderator Smith called the body to order. Eider J. 

D. Newton read the 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

A religious newspaper should not only furnish religious news, 
but should contain sound doctrine and spiritual food. There is 
such a cry for union throughout our land that even our Baptist pa- 
pers as well as our Baptist pulpits may be more or less influenced 
by the current. Every Christian soul needs deeply spiritual food. 
We need not only to be fed from pages of our religious papers, but 
we need in them a guide ; therefore they should give forth no uncer- 
tain sound in matters relating to the Bible. 

Our religious papers also should be simple and explicit in 
statement, so that all, even the children in our homes, can under- 
stand. This is a story-telling age and it is the person who can re- 
late the most attractive story who gets the best pay, but our child- 
ren need something else besides stories. It is also an age when 
writers, speakers and even parents are pandering to the idea of 
pleasing the children, when they really should have the idea in- 
stilled into their natures of seeking to please the parents. Child- 
ren need to learn something else besides how to be pleased, and 
that is, how to please. 

There are getting to be so many heroes and heroines outside 
the Bible that our children may eventually lose sight of the hero- 
ism of Joseph, of Daniel, of John the Baptist, of Stephen and Paul. 

We do not believe that it is the mission of our religious news- 
papers to keep their readers informed about politics, but its true 
mission is that of winning and developing souls. If the religious 
paper is to be a real help to the pastor, it must be filled with the 
burning matter of the Gospel of Christ. 

While the minister may reach the ears of three or four hundred 
people each week, the religious paper will reach fifteen thousand 
ears and more. What a tremendous responsibility rests upon the 
writers who so largely shape the religious thought and character of 
a denomination in a whole state! 

Think of a single paragraph penetrating the minds and hearts 
of fifteen thousand souls. How important that this paragraph 
should contain some great truth of God which the Holy Spirit would 
be willing to seal forever ! 

The condition of a christian home without a religious paper is 
indeed a pitiable one and every effort possible should be made to 



6 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



place one or more of our most excellent papers in the many homes 
that are now destitute of this class of literature. 

The following- is a list of papers from which you may select and 
the price and address are here given : 

Biblical Recorder, $1.50, Raleigh, N. C; North Carolina Bap- 
tist, $1.00, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Charity and Children, $1.00, Thom- 
asville, N. C; Church Worker, 25c, Lexington, N. C; Foreign 
Mission Journal, 35c, Richmond, Va.; Our Home Field. 10c, At- 
lanta, Ga. 

We humbly plead with the brethren not to try to train their 
families without the help of one or more of the papers mentioned. 
Please do not select the one y v ou think is the cheapest, but the one 
you think will help you most. 

Very Respectfully, J. D. NEWTON. 

This report was spoken to by J. D. Newton, J. W. 
Cobb and Henry Sheets, after which the report was 
adopted. 

Immediately following this discussion Elder J. M. 
Hilliard read the 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

These times in which we are now living are times of rapid prog- 
ress and everything seems hastening to some great end. The time 
has passed for the plodding man, he must now be up and doing. 

We must all try to keep pace with this fast age, and since our 
work is in the churches we must hasten our work forward by the 
means of education. This education should be of that type which 
will develop in our young people those noble traits of character 
which will make them useful men and women as citizens of the 
country and especially as workers in our churches. Let us strive 
to have these characteristics ever kept before our people in our 
colleges and high schools. Then let us give our hearty support to 
Wake Forest College, Baptist Female University and other Baptist 
schools, where our boys and girls will be taught the great princi- 
ples of christian education, and then we may expect from them effi- 
cient work in our churches. 

We would most heartily commend to the consideration of our 
churches the Board of Education at Wake Forest College, which is 
doing so much to aid indigent young men, called of God to the Gos- 
pel ministrv, to obtain an education. 

J. M. HILLIARD, 
L. G. LEWIS. 

This report was discussed by J. M. Hilliard, W. R. 
Cullum and W. F. Fry. After this thrilling discussion the 
several churches, through those present, made pledges to 
try to raise the amount pledged by the association at Win- 
ston at last State Convention. 

After this a cash collection was taken for the debt on 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



7 



the University, amounting to $10.75. 

Following, Bro. W. A. Smith made a motion that the 
Moderator appoint a committee of three to arrange for ed- 
ucational rallies to be held in the several churches. The 
following brethren were appointed, viz : John R. Miller, 
W. A. Smith and Henry Sheets. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

All mission work must have a basis. State missions means the 
organization and the edification of Baptist churches in North Car- 
olina. Our State mission work is usually divided into three parts, 
namely, the mountain or western, the eastern and the factory popu- 
lation. 

1. There is no lack for Baptists in the western districts, but 
the real need is the mental and moral training of the professed mem- 
bership of the churches. This need can only be supplied by the es- 
tablishment and maintenance of schools and the sending- and sup- 
porting of qualified ministers. Money and teachers are being sup- 
plied in numbers by some other denominations and it remains to 
be proved whether Baptists are going to hold their priceless pos- 
sessions. 

2. There are vast areas of country in the coast section that are 
entirely destitute of Baptist preaching to say nothing of Baptist 
churches. Hyde county has not a Baptist preacher in its bounds 
and it is said that this county alone will harvest corn enough to 
supply the state. The Board is calling for a number of good men 
to occupy this great section and also for contributions from the 
churches to sustain these men. 

3. The exodus from the rural districts to the factory towns is 
without a parellel in the history of our state. The Board earnestly 
desires to supply this rapidly increasing population with the Gos- 
pel as Baptists believe and teach it. It has been proved that our 
money and efforts used in building up churches among this class of 
our people have brought back returns to the Board which have 
been gratifying indeed. , 

Our opportunity is at hand. Will we seize it ? Will we allow 
the spirit of God to open our hearts and purses and press with vig- 
or the great work of saving the state? 

Respectfully, 

J. D. NEWTON. 

This report was spoken to by Elder W. C. Newton. 
Pledges were taken to be paid during the coming year. 
Bro. W. A. Smith read the 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

On so short a notice your committee is not prepared to render 
an adequate report on Foreign missions, yet it is very gratifying to 



8 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



note that the past conventional year was marked with glorious suc- 
cess. There were 1439 baptisms, which is by far the largest num- 
ber in any year in the history of oar Board. The receipts of the 
Board last year amounted to $173,439.49. In the year preceding it 
was $156,083.33. Twenty-six new missionaries have been sent out 
within the past year. 

The Bible has been translated into well nigh all languages and 
tongues. The barriers to spread of the Gospel have been and are 
still being broken down. The missionary now finds protection 
everywhere and his message is gladly received by the thousands 
who hear it from time to time. 

There are seven Theological Training schools in foreign coun- 
tries for the training of native helpers. The publication societies 
in Canton, China, are meeting a great demand. 

Something like three-fourths of the world lies in heathen dark- 
ness and the millions are going down in sin and death every year. 

"For these poor benighted millions 

We can give and work and pray, 
And our gifts and prayers united 

Sure will speed that happy day, 
When no more to idol bowing — 

Jesus only shall be king, 
And ten thousand voices ringing 

Shall His praise victorious sing." 

Brethren, we cannot afford, as individuals, and churches, to ig- 
nore the great command of our Lord to preach the Gospel to every 
creature. God will bless that church and that individual who will 
pray for missions and give according to his ability to its support. 
Let all the churches make an advance of at least 25 per cent, upon 
their former pledges to this great work. 

The Foreign Mission Journal ought to be in every Baptist 
home. It is only 35 cents a year. 

Mission tracks may be had free by any one who will write Rev. 
R. J. Willingham, Richmond, Va., for them. Send for the Foreign 
Mission Journal and ask for mission tracks. 

Brethren, let us work, pray and give for missions and thus lay 
up for ourselves treasures in heaven and help to save a dying 
world. Respectfully submitted, 

Your Committee, 

W. A. SMITH. 

The report was discussed by Bro. Smith, after which 
pledges were taken. Adopted. 

Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention, John R. 
Miller ; alternate Henry Sheets. 

Delegates to North Carolina Baptist State Convention- 
John D. Holt, A. A. Lofiin, C. M. Wall ; alternates— Jeff 
Lanning,J. T. Valentine and Archibald Johnson. 

The committee to nominate the Executive Board rec- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



9 



om mended the following brethren, viz : John R. Miller, 
James Smith, William Bowers, W. C. Roach and C. M. 
Wall. The report was adopted. 

The committee on an Associational History reported 
that because of press of business the manuscript was not 
yet ready, but will be ready by next association. The 
committee was continued. 

The pastor announced that Bro. W. A. Smith would 
preach in this house tonight at 8:15. 

Adjourned. Benediction by Elder Leach. 

At Night. 

According to announcement Bro. Smith preached to 
an attentive audience a most helpful sermon. 

Bro. J. T. Valentine, chairman of Committee on Pi- 
nance, submitted their report, which was adopted. (See 
report latter part of minutes.) 

On motion of Bro. John R. Miller the clerk was allow- 
ed $10 for his services and remainder of minute fund to be 
spent in the publication of the minutes. 

Thursday Morning, Aug. 21. 

Religious exercises conducted by Elder Jeff Lanning. 
The Treasurer, Bro. S. H. Averitt, read his report, 
which was adopted, and which herewith follows : 



10 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

AMOUNT RECEIVED. 

Home Missions — From Finance Committee and churches $ 43 82 

State Missions — From Finance Committee and churches 120 12 

Foreign Missions — From Finance Com. and churches 78 58 

Seminary — Churches 15 32 

Minute Fund — From Finance Committee 25 22 

Ministers' Relief — From Finance Com. and churches... 24 49 

Ministerial Education 42 22 

Education 10 32 

S. S. Missions — From Finance Com. and churches 8 68 

Total $368 77 

DISBURSEMENT S . 

Home Missions — To Walter Durham, treasurer $ 43 82 

State Missions — Walter Durham, treas. and miss'aries 120 12 

Foreign Missions — To Walter Durham, treasurer 78 58 

Seminary — To B. Pressly Smith, treasurer 15 32 

Minute Fund — To Rev. Henry Sheets 25 22 

Ministers' Relief — To Walter Durham, treasurer 24 49 

Ministerial Education — To Walter Durham, treasurer 42 22 
Education — To Walter Durham, treas., and R.T.Vann, 10 32 
S. S. Missions—To Walter Durham, treasurer 8 68 

Total , $368 77 

S. H. AVER ITT, Treasurer, 

Report adopted. 

Elder Jeff Lanning presented the 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Your Committee on Sunday Schools beg leave to report the fol- 
lowing* : 

We believe that the Sunday school is a part of church work, 
and that it is the duty of both pastor and church to engage in this 
work. We are glad that we can report a growing- interest among 
our churches to teach Bible truths to the young- people. 

How important that our children have a knowledge of the Bible 
early in life. 

We believe the Sunday school to be a great means by which to 
develop the membership of the churches in all departments of the 
Lord's work. We recommend the use of our Sunday school litera- 
ture to all of our Sunday schools. Respectfully submitted, 



O. T. DAVIES, | 
JEFF LANNING, f 



Com. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



11 



This report was discussed by Elder banning and W. 
A. Smith. Adopted. 

The following was read before the body : 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS' RELIEF BOARD. 

The Aged Ministers' Relief Board of our convention, located 
at Durham, N. C, was instituted some tenor twelve years ago. The 
object of this board is to help provide the necessities of life for aged 
ministers who are old and feeble, and who are in needy circum- 
stances. 

These old brethren were the pioneers of our work as a denomi- 
nation. They have labored and we have entered into their labors. 
They received but small remuneration for their services and are 
now left in extreme poverty in their declining years, and as a de- 
nomination we do not want them to spend their declining years in 
the county homes, dejected and neglected. 

The plan of this board is to make a reserved fund of one-third 
of the money contributed, and place the same at interest for the ben- 
efit of the board, and the other two-thirds goes directly to the prop- 
er beneficiaries. 

Brethren, let every church and every member take part in help- 
ing to feed and cloth these dear old brethren in their last days. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

H. C. TYSINGER, Com. 

Spoken to by W. A. Smith. Pledges taken and re- 
port adopted. 

Deacon William Bowers read the 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board was instituted in the year of our 
Lord, 1845, by our Southern Baptist Convention to co-operate with 
other Boards in the Convention, to do work which they could not 
do, and there has been an open door for this Board ever since, 
down to the present time. And no other Board has attained greater 
results according to the support given it. It fits itself to rich and 
poor alike; .the city and the remotest rural districts, with its ear 
ever open to the Macedonian cry, with the good Samaritan-like 
spirit. 

Last year's work shows additions, total, 17,201; churches con- 
stituted 231 ; houses of worship built and repaired, 398 ; Sunday 
schools organized, 874; Bibles and Testaments distributed, 27,499*: 
tracks distributed, pages, 2,084,355. 

What this Board needs most is strength to hold up its arm. 
This given, the results will continue to be good. May the Lord 
bless the efforts made by this Board. 



Respectfully submitted, WILLIAM BOWERS. 



12 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



Discussed by Bro. William Bowers, John R. Miller 
and W. A. Smith. Adopted. 

Bro. S. H. Averitt read the excellent 
ORPHANAGE REPORT. 

The Liberty Association should take peculiar pride in our Or- 
phanage work, located in the bounds of our body. We have not 
shown so liberal a spirit toward the institution as many other asso- 
ciations which are very remote from this section of the State. The 
Tar River is represented by a large number of buildings, and pours 
into the treasury of the Orphanage a yearly contribution with which 
that of the Liberty association is not worthy to be compared. 

The Lord has honored us above our brethren in giving us this 
blessed institution, and it should kindle our zeal and quicken all 
our denominational life to come in touch with it as no other people 
in North Carolina do. 

Our people know too little about the Orphanage. We should 
inform ourselves about its work and keep our hearts warm under 
the influence that it always kindles. Fewer copies of Charity and 
Children are taken in this association than in many others, hun- 
dreds of miles away. 

The institution has in its care at the present time about 213 
children. The year's work which closed June 30th was highly satis- 
factory. The health of the children has been excellent, the bill for 
medicine and medical attendance having been only about $100.00. 

The economy with which the Orphanage is managed has always 
been a strong and striking feature of the work. $4.75 a month 
maintains a child, and this includes all the running expenses of the 
Orphanage, salaries and all. Where can an institution be found 
which can make a better showing? The General Manager and his 
wife are well known to us all and so long as they are in charge we 
need have no fear that the money sent by our churches to support 
theOrphanage will be wasted. 

The crop prospects are excellent. Wheat was light but the corn 
crop will more than make up for it. The Mill's shop is under full 
headway and, we hope, w T ili pay it's own way this year. A shoe 
shop under the care of a competent workman promises to do a good 
business, and Charity and Children puts a yearly profit into the- 
treasury of a thousand dollars. 

A new dormitory is in process of erection and will be open to 
admit forty little boys in the early fall. It is a gift to the Orphan- 
age by Mr. J. A. Durham, a prosperous business man of Charlotte, 
and is a memorial to a sainted mother, who has passed into the 
skies. 

These additional orphans will run the number up to more than 
250 and we urge our churches to enlarge their contributions to meet 
the enlarged demands. 

God has thrown these little ones upon us, brethren, and we 
must help to supply their needs. A thousand others are yet un- 
cared for and exposed to all the snares of the evil one. They are 
crying to us to help them. Shall we heed their cries? ''In as 
much as ye did it not to one of these little ones, ye did it not to 
me." ' Respectfullv submitted, 

S. EL. AVERITT, for Com. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



13 



This excellent report was spoken to by Bro. Averitt. 
the treasurer of our Orphanage. Keport adopted. 
Brother John W. Cole read the 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Perhaps no evil is so universal, or so far-reaching among - our 
churches, as intemperance. The very attendants of this evil bring- 
upon our churches and people in general a kind of disrespect and 
ingratitude toward the welfare ana betterment of both church and 
state. If we persist in the present condition of things we may only 
hope to continue making a record which will indicate a most un- 
wholesome church constituency as well as one that will ever be a 
blot upon our christian endeavor in allowing; such things to exist. 

Believing tha: the future of our government, both morally and 
religiously, will be determined by the way and manner in which our 
churches treat this subject, we would recommend that our people 
use every available means to reduce this most obnoxious evil and 
thereby destroy the poisonous influences of the saloon* and their 
other agencies to cripple the morality and religion of our boys and 
girls, even at the cost of a change of political opinion. 

J. W. COLE. 

This report brought out the most spirited discussion 
of the session, which was participated in by Jeff Lanning, 
Henry Sheets. W. H. Smith. John A. Summey and Wil- 
liam Bowers. It was most heartily adopted. 

Bro. W. A. Smith offered resolution of thanks : 

Resolved. That we. the delegates and visitors to this associa- 
tion, do hereby express our sincere and heartfelt thanks for the 
kind hospitality extended during this session of Liberty association. 

Adjourned to meet at Jersey on Tuesday after the 
third Sunday in August. 1903. 

JAMES SMITH. Moderator. 

Henry Sheets. Clerk. 



Woman's Missionary Societies. 

There are only two in the association : 
Holloway's — Mrs. J. F. Peters. Young's, president. 
Contributions : State missions. ^5.50: Home missions. 

Lexington — Miss Roxie Sheets. Lexington. president. 
This society has 34 members. Contributions : State mis- 
sions. Ss : Home missions. $8 : Foreign missions $8. 



i 



Report of Committee on Finance* 



CHURCHES. 


State Missions. 


Foreign Miss 'ns 


Home Missions 


Education. 


Ministerial 

Relief. 


Orphanage. 


Minute Fund. 


Total. 


Union Meeting- 




8 00 


7 00 


7 00 
4 00 










Abbott's Creek 






2 00 


6 00 




50 


50 


50 


50 
56 
1 00 


50 
3 80 

50 
1 67 


30 2 80 




1 50 
1 00 
3 91 


1 74 

1*33 

35 


7 60 
5 00 
16 16 

2 85 


El Dorado 

Holloway 's 


1 00 
9 25 
1 00 


50 


1 00 


Huldah 


50 


1 00 




Jackson's Creek 








4 05 
12 96 
4 00 








8 00 


2 00 


20 26 
22 44 
1 00 


2 55 
2 50 
71 
1 48 


34 31 
42 90 
12 71 
21 48 








Liberty 


1 00 
10 00 


4 00 1 00 


1 00 

2 00 


Lick Crfiek 


5 00 


3 00 


Ma.nle Sni'inp-s.. 




Marion 
















20 
5 80 
1 60 


Mt. Lebanon.... 
New Friendship 
Oak Hill 


2 00 




1 00 




50 


2 00 


30 
1 60 


















Orphanage 















2 00 
2 37 
1 40 


2 00 
21 67 
1 40 


Pine M. House 







5 00 


2 30 


2 00 


10 00 









Pleasant Fork.. 














Reed's X Roads 
Rich Fork 


55 












1 35 
86 
1 41 


1 90 
5 28 
13 59 
1 50 

3 11 

4 55 






2 06 
1 00 


2 18 
1 16 


18 
2 60 
I 50 


Stoner's Grove 


2 47 


2 60 


2 35 


Thomasville 


1 50 


50 
1 00 




25 





86 
55 


Gravel Hill 


1 00 




2 00 


Taylor's Grove 
























44 28 


26 60) 


27 85 


34 02 


15 47 


68 45 


25 66 250 58 



Table of Pledges for 1902-1903. 



CHURCHES. 



Abbott's Creek i 

Center Cross 

Denton j 

Gravel Hill I 

Holloway's j 

Huldah 

Jackson's Creek 

Jersey 

Lexington j 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

Maple Spring's.., 

Marion 

Mt. Lebanon 

New Friendship; 

Oak Hill 

Orphanage 

Pine M. House.. | 

Piney Grove 

Pleasant Fork.. 
Reed's XRoads 

Rich Fork 

Stoner's Grove 

Summerville 

Taylor's Grove 

Thomasville 

Union Meeting - .. 



12 00 



5 00 
1 00 
15 00 
1 00 



"53 
© 























ini 









10 00 



5 00: 
1 00 
12 00 



18 00 
35 00 
4 00 
10 00 



2 50 
15 00 



50 00 
11 00 
30 00 



7 00 
7 00 
3 50 



2 00 
2 50 
12 00 



18 001 4 5o| 

50| 5o! 

10 00i 2 oo 

1 OOj loo 

20 001 3 oo 

1 OOj loo 



6 00! 18 001 8 00 25 00i 2 oo 

20 00 50 00 15 OOj 30 00| 5 oo 

5 00 11 00| 3 00 10 oo! 1 5o 

6 00 1 10 00 3 00 5 oo 2 oo 



1 00! 

6 00! 



3 00 
10 00 



1 00 1 oo 1 oo 
5 00 25 oo 2 oo 



! eg 

L s 

: QQ go 

o LS ea P 
Eh CLfflD 

I ~ 
54 5oi 

2 5o ! 

27 5o| 5 oo 

5oo| loo 
6ooo| 25 oo 

5 oo' 



77 ool 3ooo 
155 oo[loo 00 
24 5oj 5 oo 
36 oo! 



9 5o 
63 oo 



30 OOj 40 00jl5 OOj 55ooj 5 oo 195 oo 
6 OOj 6 OOl 5 OOi looo 2 oo 4ooo 
17 50| 35 00 6 00 2o ooj 5 ooj 113 5o 



5 00 18 00 
3 OOj 6 00 
2 50 ! 3 50 



50 3 00 
1 00! 1 00 
12 00 12 00 



15ooo 
25 oo 
6ooo 



3 00! 25 ooj 3 oo 
2 50 1 6 oo 1 5o 
1 50 3 oo 1 5o 



50 1 5o| 1 oo 
2 00 1 ooj 1 oo 
12 00| 12 ooj 3 oo 



61 oo 
26 oo 
15 5o 



8 5o 
8 5o 
63 oo 



243 50 137 00 254 50 97 00 28ooo!48 5o lo6o5o 459 5o 



25 oo 
25 oo 
5 oo 



1 oo 

2 oo 



jooips uiojj suisijdug 


















■ co co © : ci 


• 1 -f 


■•aotrepuawy 


fo :hxiico'C 

CO • © CM (N rfi CO 


CM. 








L 


• • © © 
: cj 




© © ; © 
iCT 'C CO I CO 


: I © 
. i co 

i 1 H 




~cT~ : <m © <m oq : 

rH • rH HH ■ 


: 01 : co 


: :»m Xi 

• ; rH CM 

• • -H CO 

; ; M CM 




ci ci ; • ; 

HH ■ ■ • 




'ULQJ[V<X SJ9(lBd 


o : o : »o o 

1— .OM • I ri 

: 


© © © 

oooca 

CM CO H 








ic © : : o 

f~ 1 • ; O 


: i © 

. 1 o 

: i © 

• 1 H 


♦A^jqn in -joa 'oa\ \ IS ! j 


: : © © 
: : © a: 

• • rH 








: : : © 
: : : © 

• rH 






: i O 
: 1 co 


,-stooqos jo -Oj£ 


: : rH rH ; rH ; 


; CO H H 








• : : -+ 1 




H H : :~H~~ 




ci 




CD ; CD rH © © CO 
l— I CO CD CO lr- CD 
; rH 


i - o © © 
© to © CO 

rH CI 








: co © 

. H rH 

: Ol M 




©OH ; CI pr 
CO CO © • © cr 








© ; co »o © h^ (M : 
r- . oqio co © © • 


© © CO © 

© CO »o CO 
rH CM 








• rH © 

: co © 

; <M rH 




ci tmo ; o © 
CO l- »c . ic CO 

i 


H 




© : co © © © © : 


i- »o x- © : 
ci : 








: m © : 
: rn m : 




r- H © : r- co 

H 


© 
-* 
H 



u 

5 

<p 
a 

CD 

CO 



CP 

3 

^ o 
® o 

CP 



ft 

p 

02 



ft 



ft 

Q 

o' 



CP 



d h "T cpj 

| Q > ,| 



03 

© ® 

: >» es P -3 g 

.HHy CO _H 



0„ ; 

: : © 
: g is 

rHPl 



• : ft 

: . cp 

• f/3 j 



O P co 



ho 



0> C 

CP.H CO 



CP 



CP 

cp - 

3 o£ 

COPQ 09 

£ 03 "5 

02 CO 
1Z! 02 
r^OQ 



0> 02 
'S CO 

a s 

co O 
rG ^=3 
OH 



co ■£ 

H 3 



■© 

CP CP 



CP 

_J cc 

3 S 

CP . 

o2pq 

Ok 



CP 

^H gj 
t^©rG 

: : cp 

g co h 

.3 02 o 

© O o 

O J« H 



-e £ cp <v 



ft H M P .S ft 

cp.^ CP <^ © 
Im : 02 u : 



> co 

02 r-j 

O 

HO 



09 



CP CP 

S.2 



^ 02 
. . CP 



02 „ 
^H 

cp ^3 
O . w. <C .CP 



o . H . . o 



1% 



5!§ 

CP CP 

OP 



f-t rH rG 

O a> g co 



CP ft 



(D H U r— 1 , 

co *rj cp^ ft 

^ K-fl O CO 

CP CP - 



: O 

: £ 

: co 

u 

co ^ 



b rl h i h3 ^ f< 



ft j 

S i 

02 : 

•"G : 

G : 

CP 

CP CO 



■ • : ce 
• • m ^ 

MM 

. o .£ 



• CP 

: co 

CO . 

CO ^ 
rG cp 

G 

oft 



£ o g S 

.— ft co O 

C9 ®rdrd 

feCSnOH 



O'orGrG 

•h 2 G 
CP 



CP 

cp & «8 • O • O 

g o o : u © sh cp 

^ « E; • ^ 

^ i s s 

+3 P CO rd 

03 QB H' H 



Od* S . 
g * S3 

rHHr^ 



b*p c sr 
2"^ 3 5 
I o § ® 

coco 
? 3 ? o 

:<:'<! 
: cd ; a> 

• • 0' 

■ go 
o 

S3 

B - 

P 



#3 

& CD 

GO P 

x& 

O o 

P 

c o : 

• o 

p. 



CD 

' a 



O ? 

cs : 

so : 

cd : 



V 

y W 51 i-pD 



CD 



g> CO : cd 

CD as CD 



c-f p p 
B • 3 

GO 

M* ° 



ST * 

CD ►->• 

: O 
• B 



2 9= ei 

o EL 

SB- 

GO* 

o 



00 



GO I— i 
CD C 



o 2 2 CT 1 
o 5 n c ® 2 
p ^p : OoT 

• co c: 
: • cd 

CD 



? ? S" 9. F$ £ <D 3 ?™a»2 £ ' 



53? 
^O g 

P 4 Q 

tr • o 

CD : CD 



: : : : : cd 



GO 



<t> 2 b 
o 2 

£3 ? 



P 

3 p 

1 C- 



► & J O CD j-. 
, B B .a, p — 



GO c+ 

5. : CO 



P 

■ CO 
CD 

OP 



OP 



3 I' f Mi's 

O o 
C~3: 3 

•• CD 
CP 



2 S - ^: 

, GO t* ! 



03 CD 

s 3 



p^.£ 

» g« cd 



B pd 

O GT 

o P. 



HJ. t_. « (J «^ 

B-^^o o,| gi 



: Co o 
• : cd : 



CD TO 



CD 

o p 



: ' cd 
OP 



M 


M 






INS 
© CC C7* 


ins: 
© h-> : 








: m 

: oi 4*. © 




SO to to 


to 
cc to 


Baptisms. 


>\ 




INS 




CC M InS 






ins cc 




: i— 'so 








: : 


Rcc'd by Leiter. 


i 






: : h- 1 


: : 






hw: : 








" :" m " 


Restorations. 


s 


! 181 




LnS 
«C 4^ 00 


InS 

-I © M 


INS cc 




M M 1— ' 




i— 1 
so cc to 


to 

CO CO 


Total. 


SSI 


to 






: o\ 


M 

to 00 


H-i cc 




InS M 
© © © C« 




I—* 


SO 


: - 


Dis. by Letter 


H 


SI 








M InS 




CC InS 


M 






© I I-J 
HCn. — i 




1— » 


to cc : : 


Exclusions. 


9 


SI 


(— » 






CC 


cc cc : 


CC 






cc : : 




to 


to 


: cc 


Deaths. 




- 1 








4* Or 


I— 1 INS 

00 © 


© CC 




ins -j tss ins 

4»- 1— ' © InS 




4>- 


: 

cc cc : 4> 


Total. 


i 
i 


C35 | 


M 




ins ; 


cc oc : 
















CO SO 


Gain. 




M 












: i— 1 

: ?o 


4^ 






cc ins (— ' 






i— i : : 
m co t : 


Loss. 




M INS W Oi M -I 0> H W 


w 


; 

; Cn4*-OC©lNS © 1— i h- > 4^- cn 
• 00©-JlNS-J©©©|NSI— l<CT-J© 


Males. 


OS 

ins 


M 




1— k M M 

INS ©' 00 INS 00 -J M M M tNS ©X INS 1— 1 
-J00C0CCCO©lNSCC4».©tfi.©CO 


Females. 


o: 


tNS 


l-l INS I- 1 

Cn 4*. :«c CJi i— ' C3i V-* CC 
4*- oc 3: cr. cc © © 


InS © 4^ 
-I C < © 




1— » 1— 1 tNS 1— i t— * I— 1 
CC INS CC © cn © h- ' -1 
Ct 4*- © Cn © Ins oc cc 


to cc sc to © 
© - 1 © - 1 X 


Total. 

r 



5 s 



mo 



£3 |S Sis i is is 
I S3 




MINUTES I 



Seventieth Annual Session 



Liberty Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



JERSEY CHURCH, i 



flUQUST 18TH, 19TH AND 20TH, 1903 



Nash Bros. 
Book and Job Printers 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Seventieth Annual Session 

OF 

Liberty Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

JERSEY CHURCH, 
August 18th, 19th and 20th, 1903. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION : 

Moderator : James Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk : Henry Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer : S. H Averitt, Thomasville, N C. 



PLACE, TIMED AND PREACHER FOR NEXT 
SESSION - 

Next session of Liberty Association will convene with the church at 
Pine M. House, seven miles northwest from Linwood Station, on Tues- 
day after the third Sunday in August, 1904. The Introductory Sermon 
by Elder G. P. Harrill ; Alternate, Elder J. D. Newton. 



List of Ordained Ministers in Liberty Association, Aug., 1903, 



Adderton, W. S., Denton, N. C 

Boone, J. B., Thomasville, N. C. 

Harrill, G. P., Thomasville, N. C. 

Lanning, Jeff, Denton, N. C. 

Leach, M. J., Lassiter, N. C. 

Miller, John R., Thomasville, N. C. 

Morton, H., Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D., Thomasville, N. C. 

Orrell, N. B Kernersville, R. F. D., N. C. 

Sheets, Henry, Lexington, N. C. 

Smith, W. A., Lexington, N. C. 

Stoker, A. P., Denton, N. C. 

Summey, John A., . Hannersville, N. C. 



Executive Board. 



John R. Miller, 
William Bowers, 

C. M. Wall. 



James Smith, 
W. C. Roach, 



Proceedings, 



Jersey Baptist Church, August 18, 1903. 
Liberty Baptist Association met with this church to-day 
in its Seventieth annual Session. The Annual Sermon was 
preached by Klder W. A. Smith, from II. Cor., 4: 6. 

Intermission for Dinner. 

On reassembling, Elder J. D. Newton conducted relig- 
ious exercises, reading Thirty-fourth Psalm and leading in 
prayer. 

The Moderator then called the body to order and pro- 
ceeded to call the roll of churches. Elders W. A. Smith 
and John R. Miller were appointed Reading Clerks. 

The names of Messengers were enrolled as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — N. R. Teague and C. H. Teague. 

Asheboro — R. L. Deaton. 

Center Cross — By letter. 

Denton — W. B. Russell, J. G. Snider and Arthur Lan- 
ning. 

Gravel Hill — Branson I. Sheets and W. D. Loflin. 

Holloway's— J. M. Prim, Sr., J. F. Carrick and J. A. 
Carrick. 

Huldah— By letter. 

Jackson's Creek — Not represented. 

Jersey— Z. T. Sharpe, L. A. Smith and G. W. Palmer. 

Lexington — H. P. Gallimore, John T. Yarbrough and R. 
B. Miller. 

Liberty— Ellis Summey and Charles Hepler. 

Lick Creek— P. M. Snider. 

Maple Springs — Not represented. 

Marion — Not represented. 

Mt. Lebanon — Not represented. 

New Friendship — R. S. Snider. 

Oak Hill — Not represented. 

Orphanage — G. P. Harrill. 

Pine M. House— W. T. Beck and R. K. Williams. 

Pine}' Grove — C. M. Wall and Ezra Matsinger. 

Pleasant Fork — Not represented. 

Reed's X Roads— C. H. Fritts. 

Rich Fork — R. S. Green, Jr., and William Clinard. 



4 



Stoner's Grove— W. C. Roach, John H. Wofford and 0. 
L. Stoner. 

Summerville — By letter. 
Taylor's Grove — John Rogers. 

Thomasville — A. J. Olive, John R. Miller and H. Mor- 

t0 After the enrollment of Messengers Bro. John R. Miller 
moved that Bro. W. A. Smith cast the vote of the body for 
Bro James Smith as Moderator during the ensuing year, 
which duty was duly performed. The Clerk, Henry 
Sheets, and Treasurer, S. H. Averitt, were both re-elected. 
Invitation to Visiting Brethren. 

The following brethren accepted seats in the body: Bro. 
Ernest L. Green, of the Central Association, and Principal- 
elect of the Liberty Association High School; Prof. J. H. 
Garrell, of Wake Forest College; Elder S. J. Beeker, repre- 
senting the North Carolina Baptist; Elder J. S. Farmer, of 
the Biblical Recorder; Bro. S. J. Hasty, of the Union Asso- 
ciation and Principal-elect of the Academy at Churchland, 
and Bro. H. A. Rovve, of the Mt. Zion Association. 

Elder J. D. Newton read the 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The best method of informing our people about our denomina- 
tional work is through the medium of our papers. You can hardly 
find an intelligent Christian home where there is not a Christian 
paper. This is perhaps an age when the press exerts a greater in- 
fluence than any age of the past. We can hardly ^ conceive^ of the 
mighty effect of the press if all its power was turned in the direction 
of serving the Lord and Master. 

But we are grateful for the earnest and intellectual men whose 
energies are being given to editing religious journals and writing 
theTr thoughts for the benefit of the brotherhood and the glory of 
God ThfLord add strength and wisdom to our brethren who have 
the responsibility of publishing our denominational papers m North 

° ThfBiblical Recorder fills a large place in the hearts of the Bap- 
tists of our State. Its influence and power is spreading more and 

^haSly^d^Sn^veB the news from our Orphanage and 
Sunday-schools do well to have large numbers of copies coming to 

^M$£^BM ^serves a wide and close reading. 
We heartily recommend the Foreign Mission Journal of Richmond 
Va to our Churches, as an indispensable help m informing our 
neople of the great work of Foreign Missions. 

The Church Worker, Lexington, N. C, is a very readable paper, 
which is sent to subscribers for only twenty-five cents a year. 

Respectfully submitted, ^ ^ NEWTON, 

P. M. SNIDER. 



5 



The report was spoken to by Elders J. D. Newton, J. S. 
Farmer, S. J. Beeker, Henry Sheets, G. P. Harrill, W. A. 
Smith and Prof. J. H. Garrell, after which the report was 
adopted. 

The committees named below were appointed: 
On Arrangements^ W. A. Smith, G. P. Harrill and R. 
S. Green, Jr. 

On Religious Exercises— Pastor and Deacons of this 
church. 

Adjourned till to-morrow morning at 9:30 o'clock. 
After the service of song, the benediction was pronounced 
by Elder G. P. Harrill. 

Wednesday Morning, August 19th. 

Religious exercises conducted by Elder R. A. Moore 
Read 34th Psalm. 

The body was then called to order for business. The 
Moderator gave a second invitation to visitors. Elders R. 
A. Moore, of the Robeson Association; W. H. Rich, of the 
Atlantic; Thomas Carrick, of the Piedmont; also Elder 
Livington Johnson, Corresponding Secretary of the Baptist 
State Convention, were recognized by the chair and ac- 
cepted seats. 

Bro. W. A. Smith read a partial Report on Arrangement 
Elder G. P. Harrill read the following: 

ORPHANAGE REPORT. 

The number of children now in care of the Orphanage is 260. 
This is the largest number we have ever reported to the Association. 
In the near future three new buildings are to be erected. One by 
Mr B, F. Aydlett, of Elizabeth City; another by the Chowan Asso- 
ciation and a third by Mr. J. C. Whitty, of New Bern, in memory 
of a beloved daughter, who has passed into the skies. These 
S^iwP W1 " be ^P ene d as soon as they are finished, and will 
swell the number to about 375. ' 

At the last meeting of the Orphanage Board, held in July a reso- 
lution was passed that not a dollar of any invested fund should be 
used in purchasing supplies for the children, but that all the in- 
terest accruing from such funds should be expended in the improve- 
ment of the plant. Thus the burden of support, instead of being 
lessened^ is really increased by the bequests which have been left 
to the Orphanage. The Lord seems to have intended the obliga- 
tion to feed and clothe the children to rest on the hearts of the 
Churches. As buildings have been needed from time to time He 
has raised up men and women of means to erect them, but always 
the current fund has been provided by the rank and file of our 
people.^ This will ever be true, and it would be a calamity if it were 



6 



These things being true, your Committee would urge the necessity 
of an increased contribution from every Church in the Association. 
This institution should be particularly dear to us, for it is right at 
our doors and we should lead the way in the enlargement of the 
work of the Orphanage. We would also urge a monthly contribu- 
tion to the Orphanage by our Sunday-schools. This plan is working 
well in hundreds of Sunday-schools in the State. It ought to work 
better in the Liberty Association than anywhere else. Shall we 
be recreant while others go forward? Shall we prove ourselves 
laggards under the shadow of the Orphanage? The call comes to 
us louder than to others. Let us promptly and nobly respond. 

S. H. AVERITT. 

Speeches were made on the above report by Elders G. P. 
Harrill, W. H. Rich and Thomas Carrick. After pledges 
had been taken, the report was adopted. 

On motion of Elder H. Morton, the Clerk was authorized 
to place the amounts pledged last year to the churches 
which failed to report this year, to be paid by August, 1 904. 

The Chair appointed the following committees to report 
next year on the subjects assigned: 

On State Missions— W. A. Smith and W. C. Barnes. 

On Home Missions— Jeff Lanning and B. I. Sheets. 

On Foreign Missions — G. P. Harrill and Z. T. Sharpe. 

On Periodicals— Henry Sheets and C. M. Wall. 

On Education— R S. Green, Jr., and R. K. Williams. 

On Baptist Orphanage— John R. Miller and T. H. Small. 

On Sunday Schools— P. M. Snider and J. M. Prim, Sr 

On Minister's Relief— N. R. Teague and W. D. Lofhn. 

On Temperance — J. A. Summey and J. A. Carrick. 

On Obituaries— J. D. Newton and H. Morton. 

To Report at This Meeting. 

On Place and Preacher— W. A. Smith, John R. Miller 
and A. J. Olive. 

To Name Executive Board— G. P. Harrill, Jeff Lanning 
and N. R. Teague. 

Committee on Finance— R. S. Green, Jr., and Arthur 
Lanning. . 

The very able and interesting report on State Missions 
was read by Elder John R, Miller. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

All mission work rests on the same foundation, namely: The 
command of Christ. There is, therefore, no difference as to the 
importance of our several classifications of missions, only in pro- 
portion to their needs. 

State missions is that part of our mission work which seeks to 



7 



evangelize and develop the people of North Carolina for greater 
service in the Master's kingdom. The two main objects, then, of 
State missions are evangelization and development. 

1st. Evangelization. While we sometimes look upon North 
Carolinians as a people well advanced in Christianity, if we stop and 
take a more careful view we will find that there is much destitution 
within our bounds. By far the larger part of our population make 
no claims of religion. In the Eastern part of the State there are 
large sections, even whole counties, without a resident minister; 
very few Churches, and scarcely any preaching. And this is true, 
not only of the East, but here in our own midst, in the Piedmont 
section, there are large areas of country without Baptist preaching 
and Baptist Churches. 

We need to occupy these places; first, because the people in these 
sections should have the Gospel as we preach it; Christ commands 
that His Gospel should be preached to all people, and if we have 
His Gospel, then we are, as Paul said, debtors to all men every- 
where to preach it unto them, whether in North Carolina or the 
isles of the sea. 

And again, there surely never has been a time when error was 
making a greater effort to capture the people than it is now doing. 
What may we expect to be the result of the teachings of Christian 
Scientists in our towns; Sinless Perfectionists in our factory dis- 
tricts, and Mormons in our neglected country communities? With 
all these, and others, seeking through covetousness and with 
feigned words to make merchandise of our people (II Pet. 2: 3); is 
it not needful to preach the Gospel in its purity to the people of 
our own State? For nothing but the whole Gospel of Christ, fear- 
lessly and faithfully proclaimed, can meet and defeat these isms, 
and save men from error and sin. 

2d. Development: Christ when here on earth, said to the fisher- 
men of Galilee: "Follow me, and I will make you to become fishers 
of men." His invitation, and at the same time command, to the 
idlers in the market, was, "Go into my vineyard and work." Fur- 
ther, the one great law of entrance into His kingdom is laid down 
in these words : "And he said to them all, If any man will come after 
me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow 
me." Salvation, then, means self-denial, cross bearing, obedience, 
service. "We are called for a purpose;" "We are saved to serve." 

Therefore, it is also a part of the work of the State Mission Board 
to enlist and utilize more fully in the Master's service, the combined 
strength of the more than 170,000 Baptists in North Carolina. 

In the Western part of. our State we have a great host of Baptist 
people, who seem to be unconscious of their great strength, and not 
awake to the responsibility resting upon them as "Soldiers of the 
cross." They need development. 

And not only in Western North Carolina, but I am persuaded that 
also in Central and Eastern North Carolina our people need to have 
their "Pure minds stirred up by way of remembrance," that we, 
too, might be more mindful of the commandments of our Lord and 
Master. Hundreds of Churches, and thousands of Baptist people 
in North Carolina only add length to the roll-call of our denomina- 
tion. What can be done— yes, what must be done — that we may 
reach and develop these people? They are good people, Christian 
men and women, saved by grace, but they seem never to have been 
touched with that holy zeal which makes one willing to lay down 
his life — to sacrifice for the cause of our Master. 

Our State Board is making an effort to reach some of these people 



8 



in the Western part of the State by means of education; and, to my 
mind, nothing ought to be left undone which carries with it the 
hope of enlisting our dormant forces. While it may not be the 
place of an Associational Committee to make suggestions to the 
State Board, yet it seems to me that something more should be 
done, in order to awake the large number of our people who are 
sleeping in their tents. Could we not inaugurate something like 
Pastors' Institutes, Missionary Institutes, or something of that 
order, by which we could enlist the pastors, and through them reach 
the Churches? Development, as I see it, is the one great need of 
our denomination in North Carolina to-day. 

One thing is certain, we cannot give to others that which we do 
not possess ourselves. Lifeless and anti-mission Churches will 
never lead sinners to Christ at home or abroad. If we would give 
the Gospel to the world, we must have it at home; we must evange- 
lize the State; we must develop our forces, and in proportion as we 
do these things, we will be able to conquer the world for Christ. 

JOHN R. MILLER. 

P. S. Brother A. A. Loflin ; who was appointed with me on this 
report, has been called to the Great Association beyond this life. 

J. R. M. 

Secretary Livingston Johnson made an able and in- 
structive speech on the above report. Pledges were then 
taken. Report adopted. 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Benediction by Elder Thomas Carrick. 

Wednesday Afternoon, August 19th. 

Bro. W. A. Smith read the report of Committee on Asso- 
ciational High School. 

REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL. 

Whereas, the union meeting of the Liberty Association convened 
at Reed's Cross Roads in November, 1902, recognizing the need of 
a first-class associational school within its bounds, appointed an in- 
vestigating committee to report at the following union meeting to 
to be held at Denton in March of 1903, as to the advisability of es- 
tablishing such a school, and the most favorable place for its loca- 
tion, and 

Whereas, this committee reported it an advisable undertaking at 
said meeting, and by its authority were continued for further inves- 
tigation as to the most favorable place to locate the school, with in- 
structions to report at the union meeting to be held at Piney Grove 
in May; and, 

Whereas, at the union meeting in session at Piney Grove, the 
same committee were continued and authorized to decide upon the 
location, so soon as the necessary information could be obtained in 
regard to the probable support and maintenance of said school; pend- 
ing the approval and endorsement of this Association in its regu- 
lar session; and, 

Whereas, this committee, after careful investigation, decided that 
Wallburg, N. C, all things considered, was the most favorable lo- 
cation and offered, by far, the best advantages, and therefore located 
the school there. Be it, therefore, 



9 



Resolved by this, the Liberty Association, That we do approve 
and endorse the actions of these several unions of the Association 
and their committees and recognize the school thus established as 
the Liberty Association School and give it our hearty support. 

COMMITTEE. 

Addresses were made by Brethren W. A. Smith and E. 
L. Green in behalf of the report and the work contem- 
plated. 

The report was then adopted. 

Indisposition kept Elder J. M. Hilliard from attending 
this session of the Association, but he prepared and sent 
the report below, which was read by Bro. John R. Miller: 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

We have never seen such efforts put forth, by nearly all of our 
people, along the line of general education as are being put forth at 
present, and this means that something will be done to educate the 
masses. We are glad that such efforts are being put forth, and 
shall rejoice, when every boy and girl in our State, shall have 
an opportunity to get at least enough education to prepare them 
to be good and intelligent citizens, and that they may be prepared 
to serve their God and their fellow-man to a better advantage. 

We, as a denomination, must not fall behind in this great work, 
but be among the leaders, for if we should fail to do our part, we 
will suffer a great loss to our denomination that we could not re- 
pair soon. 

So, then, let us do our part in the general education of our peo- 
ple, especially let us look after our own institutions — Wake Forest 
is the place for our boys and the Baptist Female University is the 
place for our girls, and let us not forget our many private colleges 
such as Oxford Seminary, Chowan Institute, and our many other 
noble schools. 

We of the Libertly Association should look well to our own asso- 
ciational school at Wallburg, and do all we can to help our princi- 
pal, Professor Earnest Green, and his assistants in their struggle to 
build up our Academy. 

REV. J. M. HILLIARD. 

After addresses by Prof. J. H. Garrell and Elder J. S. 
Farmer, which included general education as well, pledges 
were taken for ministerial education, and then the report 
was adopted. 

The Report on Home Missions was read by Bro. G. P. 
Harrill. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 
was organized in 1845, for the purpose of giving the gospel not 
only to the white people, but to the Indians and Negroes in destitute 
parts of the territory covered by the Southern Baptist Convention. 
This territory is now composed of the Southern States, Maryland, 
Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Cuba. 

Into our Southland foreigners are coming by the thousands every 
month, bringing with them doctrines and practices that are not only 



10 



alien to our faith, but subversive and antagonistic to it. Many of 
these foreigners go directly to the Western Frontiers, there to make 
their homes side by side with our own kinsmen from the Eastern 
States. We must evangelize them or they will heathenize our 
kinsmen. And this is done largely by the missionaries employed 
by our Home Board. 

Let us remember that the Home Mission Board works in co- 
operation with our State Boards, and in no sense does it antagonize 
or compete with them. One great work of the Home Board has 
been to help some of the States to organize, and to strengthen 
those already organized. 

Let us not forget, also, that the Home Board has helped no little 
to make us strong in our own State; the churches in Charlotte, 
Salisbury, Greensboro, Asheville, Raleigh, Goldsboro, New Bern, 
Edenton, Tarboro, Elizabeth City, Washington, Chapel Hill, Warren- 
ton, Hendersonville, Waynesville, Bryson City, Murphy and Concord 
have all been aided by the Home Board. 

In view of the above facts we recommend that the churches in- 
crease their pledges to the Home Mission Board. 

G. P. HARRILL, for Committee. 

Remarks were made on the above report by Secretary 
Johnson, Elders S. J. Beeker and W. A. Smith. After 
pledges had been secured, the report was adopted. 

The Committee on Place and Preacher made the follow- 
ing report: 

That, Pine Meeting House be the place and Elder G. P. Harrill 
the preacher; Alternate — Elder J. D. Newton. 

W. A. Smith read the following 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

It is with gratitude to God that we mark the onward strides in 
our Foreign Mission work as carried on by the Southern Baptist 
Convention. The past year appears to have been the most success- 
ful in the history of the Convention. During the last Convention 
year over $200,000 was contributed to Foreign Missions in Southern 
Convention, and the present year we obligated to raise $300,000 for 
this purpose. Last year's report shows 1,439 baptisms on Foreign 
fields, while we report at present about 1800 baptisms during the 
year just closed. 

At our last State Convention at Durham, we advanced our pledges 
from $12,000 to $20,000 for Foreign Missions which means an 
increase of some sixty per cent, on the former year, and if we meet 
our part must make this advance in our pledges. 

Nearly three fourths of the world is yet in heathen darkness and 
the command of Christ is to "go preach the gospel to every crea- 
ture," and we shall prove recreant to our trust unless we meet the 
demand and "go forward." 

We have now about 118 missionaries on the field and the de- 
mand is for an increase in our mission forces, and there are others 
ready to go, if only the necessary means were in hand to support 
them. Brethren can we stand in the judgment and face the indiffer- 
ence which seems so prevalent among the churches to which we 
belong? 

May the Spirit of God lead us in this the mightiest work in this 



11 



world — the leading of the world to Him who taketh away the sins 
of the world. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. A. SMITH, 
O. L. STONER, 

Committee. 

Elder W. H. Rich made an able speech on the report; 
pledges taken; report adopted. 

A small Baptist church was constituted at night on the 
27th of November, 1902, containing seven members. This 
little band came forward through the pastor, Elder J. D. 
Newton and Delegate R. L. Deaton, presented an applica- 
tion for membership in this body and on motion was unan- 
imously received into our fellowship, the Moderator extend- 
ing the right hand of fellowship. 

The committee to nominate the Executive Board for the 
ensuing year made the following report: 

We recommend the continuation of the present Board, viz: John 
R. Miller, James Smith, W. C. Roach, William Bowers and C. M. 
Wall. 

The committee to name four Trustees in behalf of this 
body for the Liberty Associational High School, named the 
following brethren: W. A. Smith, R. S. Green, Jr., J. A. 
Carrick and Archibald Johnson. 

The Committee on Arrangements reported for the work 
to-morrow as follows: 

9:30-10 — Devotional Exercises. 

10- 10:30— Sunday Schools. 
10:30-11— Ministerial Relief. 

1 1- 1 1 :30 — Temperance. 
11:30-12— Miscellaneous. 
12 M. — Adjournment. 

On motion adjourned. 

Benediction by Livingston Johnson. 

Thursday Morning, August 20th. 

Religious exercises conducted by Elder H. Morton. At 
the close of this service the body was called to order. Elder 
Jeff Lanning read the following 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Your Committee on Sunday School beg leave to report the fol- 
lowing: 

We believe that the Sunday School is a part of church work, and 
that it is thf duty of both pastor and church to engage in this work. 



12 



We are glad that we can report a growing interest among our 
churches to teach Bible truths to the young people. How impor- 
tant that our children have a knowledge of the Bible early in life. 

We believe the Sunday School to be a great means by which 
to develop the membership of the churches in all departments of 
the Lord's work. 

We recommend the use of our Sunday School literature to all 
of our Sunday Schools. Respectfully submitted, 

JEFF LANNING, Committee. 

Elder Lanning spoke to this report in an interesting and 
humorous vein. On motion, the speeches were limited to 
five minutes in length during the remainder of the session. 

Bro. H. A. Rome followed Bro. Lanning. 

The report adopted. 

Bro. Henry Sheets read the 

REPORT ON MINISTER'S RELIEF. 

Many of God's servants in the ministry have done their work, and 
without a just compensation, giving their time largely to this 
work, and now in old age, some of them or their widows are with- 
out the means of support. 

The Convention decided several years ago to make the care of 
these aged ministers an object of their contributions and prayers. 

This Association has for several years been aiding this worthy 
object, and your committee has hope that the churches will never 
forget these faithful soldiers of the Cross. It is urged that a 
special collection be taken at least once a year for this work and 
that a month's notice of such collection be given and that every 
member of the churches help this work. Will not the deacons and 
other laymen take the lead in this work? 

HENRY SHEETS, 
W. C. BARNES, 

Committee. 

Remarks were submitted by Bro. W. C. Barnes and Elder 
R. A. Moore. Report adopted. 

Bro. N. R. Teague read report as follows: 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

While there are many ways of intemperance, yet the use of 
intoxicating drink usually leads to other intemperate habits. It 
is a deadly poison if persisted in — causing death of both soul and 
body. It is ruining the youth of our land and is hindering the 
progress of both Church and State. 

It is corrupting our Legislature and government and is the father 
of most of the crimes of our land either directly or indirectly. 
When viewing it in a true light it is alarming. 

We are glad to report however that the temperance people of our 
State are aroused, and are manifesting the greatest interest in the 
cause that has ever been known; consequently a mighty opposing 
force is rising, and a great battle is on. And inasmuch as we 
failed to get a law in our last Legislature which would have large- 
ly regulated the "Liquor Traffic" if enforced — shall not our church- 
es use their influence in order that temperance men may be select- 
ed to make laws for our country. In order that we be fully equip- 



13 



ped we recommend local organization that teach individual mem- 
ber may feel his responsibility in this great struggle and in help- 
ing to enforce the laws we already have because laws will not pro- 
hibit unless enforced. After all it is largely in the hands of the 
people as well or even more than the politician. Surely then the 
Christian people of our State should lead and stand firm in fighting 
this mighty giant. Trusting and having faith in the Lord that our 
State may be rescued from this mighty evil. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. R. TEAGUE. 

This report brought a lively and interesting discussion, 
participated in by N. R. Teague, G. P. Harrill, Jeff Lan- 
ning, S. J. Beeker, H. Morton and John R. Miller. 

The report was adopted by a hearty vote. 

A report was called for in regard to history of Liberty 
Association. On account of press of other business, the 
manuscript has not all been prepared for the printer, but 
will be, the Lord willing, before another session of this body. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee to se- 
cure financial support for the publication of the history, 
viz: G. P. Harrill, John R. Miller and C. M. Wall. 



CHURCHES. 


w. 






*3 
H 


P3 


o 




Total. 
















30 
1 50 

25 
1 23 

1 85 

2 22 
2 50 
1 35 
1 05 

35 
1 50 

1 75 
1 35 
1 00 
1 02 

75 
52 
50 


30 

23 80 
3 25 

12 08 
21 85 
2 57 
32 50 
21 85 

24 01 
10 85 

1 50 

1332 
1 35 
7 00 
7 46 
75 
52 
5 85 


Abbott's Creek . 
Center Cross . . . 


4 00 
50 






5 00 
50 
2 00 


4 50 
50 
2 00 


8 80 
50 

1 39 
20 00 

35 
30 00 
10 00 
6 18 

2 00 


50 
1 96 


50 
3 50 


Holloway's 




























Liberty 




4 00 

5 63 
3 00 


2 00 

3 20 
1 00 


3 00 
1 60 
1 00 


1 50 
1 00 
1 00 


Lick Creek 

Mt. Lebanon . . . 
New Friendship 


5 35 
2 50 


Orphanage 












li 57 














Reed's X Roads 












Rich Fork 












6 00 

3 22 










1 50 


1 72 


Thomasville 








Gravel Hilll 














Taylor's Grove. . . 


i 30 


2 05 


50 






1 50 


Total 


13 65 


17 14 10 70 


14 60 


12 22 


101 51 


20 99 


193 51 





$2.70 from Gravel Hill to finish pledges. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT S GREEN, Jr., 
N. R. TEAGUE, 

Committee. 



14 

Elder G. P. Harrill was appointed a delegate to Southern 
Baptist Convention. Alternate — John R. Miller. 

The following brethren were appointed as delegates to the 
Baptist State Convention next December: H. Morton, Jas. 
Smith and N. R. Teague. Alternates — Jeff Lanning, Henry 
Sheets and Z. T. Sharpe. 

Bro. C. M. Wall was appointed as Associational delegate 
to represent our Association at the meetings of the State 
Board, and that the churches pay his travelling expenses. 

Bro. Henry Sheets offered the following for the consider- 
ation of the body: 

PREAMBLE AND RESOLUTION. 

Whereas, There is no place within the bounds of the Liberty As- 
sociation, where Church or Associational records can be preserved 
for the benefit of the future historian; therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That the churches composing the Liberty Association, 
take into consideration the advisability of buliding a fire proof vault 
at such place, as may be agreed upon at some future time, in which 
all our Church and Associational records together with all such 
historical data as may be made and recorded, can be preserved 
against fire or the ravages of time. 

While no speeches were made, there were words of ap- 
proval by all, so far as was ascertained. It is hoped that 
at no distant day such provision will be made. On motion, 
the above was adopted. 

Treasurer Averitt offered the report which follows: 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION TREASURER'S REPORT. 

AMOUNT RECEIVED. 



State Missions , $ 135 53 

Home Missions 68 22 

Foreign Missions 84 03 

Educaiton 10 38 

Ministerial Relief 22 47 

Baptist Female University 175 64 

Sunday School Missions 4 99 

Minute Fund i 25 66 



Total $ 526 92 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

State Missions $ 135 53 

Home Missions 68 22 

Foreign Missions 84 03 

Education 10 38 

Ministerial Relief 22 47 

Baptist Female University 175 64 

Sunday School Missions 4 99 

Minute Fund . 25 66 



Total $ 526 92 



S. H. AVERITT, Treasurer. 



15 



The above report adopted. 

Bro. S. H. Averitt moved that the Clerk superintend the 
printing of the Minutes, and that he be allowed ten dollars 
for his services. Motion carried. 

It was further moved and carried that the churches be 
asked to make the Minute fund $28.00, if needed, to print 
the usual amount of Minutes. 

The Woman's Missionary Society of Lexington Baptist 
Church, having a membership of 35, have contributed dur- 
ing the year the following amounts: 



Foreign Missions $ 6 75 

State Missions 10 25 

Home Missions 6 00 

Christmas Offering , 1 66 

Church debt • 82 07 



Total $ 106 73 



Report of Committee on Finance. 



CHURCHES. 


State Miss. 


Home Miss. 


Foreign Miss. 


Orphanage. 


Ministerial 
Education. 


Minister's 
R. Board. 


Minute Fund. 


Abbott's Creek 


4 00 






8 80 


5 00 


4 50 


1 50 


Center Cross 


50 


50 
3 50 


50 
1 96 


50 
1 39 
1 20 
20 00 


50 
2 00 
1 50 


50 
2 00 
1 00 


25 
1 23 
52 

1 85 
21 

2 22 
2 50 
1 35 
1 05 

1 50 

2 00 
35 

1 62 
1 75 
1 35 
1 00 
1 02 
50 
75 


Denton 


Gravel Hill 




Holloway's 








Huldah 








Jersey 








35 
30 00 
10 00 
6 18 














"SOO 
1 60 


1 50 
1 00 


Liberty 




2 00 

3 20 


4 00 

5 63 


Lick Creek 


5 35 




Orphanage 
















2 50 


1 00 


3 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


Pine M'g House 










11 57 






Reed's Cross Roads , . 












Rich Fork 








6 00 
3 22 
1 50 


1 50 


i 72 










Taylor's Grove 


1 30 


50 


2 05 


Thomasville 




















Totals 


13 65 


10 70 


17 14 


102 71 


15 10 


13 22 


24 52 



16 



RESOLUTION OF THANKS. 

Resolved, That we, the delegates and visitors of this Association, do 
hereby express our sincere and heartfelt thanks for the kind hospitality 
extended to us by the brethren and sisters of Jersey Church during the 
session of the Liberty Association. 

G. P. HARRILL. 

The above resolution was adopted with a most hearty 
vote. 

Thus ended a good, harmonious session of the Liberty- 
Association. Now it remains for pastors and people to carry 
out the work mapped out for the year ending August, 1904. 
May the Lord give us grace to go far beyond what has been 
planned. 

We must note the excellent service rendered by the 
choir. The young folks acquitted themselves well in the 
service of song, and visitors fully appreciated it. 

Adjourned to meet at Pine M. House on Tuesday after 
third Sunday in August, 1904. 

JAMES SMITH, Moderator. 

Henry Sheets, Clerk. 



17 



Table of Pledges for 1903-1904. 



CHURCHES. 


Orphanage. 


State Miss. 


Education 


Home Miss. 


Foreign Miss. 


Ministerial 
Relief Bd. 




18 00 


:3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 50 


3 50 




50 


50 


1 00 


50 


50 


50 


Denton 


10 00 


6 00 


2 00 


3 50 


5 00 


3 00 


Gravel Hill. 


1 25 


1 25 


50 


50 


1 50 


1 00 


Holloway's 




15 00 


5 00 


5 00 


12 00 


3 50 


Huldah 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


Jackson's Creek 






20 00 


'2o'6o 


800 


5 00 


18 00 


2 00 


Lexington 


40 00 


35 00 


15 00 


20 00 


50 00 


5 00 




10 50 


4 00 


3 00 


5 00 


11 00 


1 50 


Lick Creek 


6 00 


10 00 


3 00 


6 00 


10 00 


1 50 












































Mt. Lebanon 




2 50 




1 00 




1 00 


New Friendship 


25 00 


10 00 


3 00 


6 00 


10 00 


1 00 


Oak Hill 
















55 00 


50 00 


15 00 


30 00 


40 00 


5 00 


"Pint* TVT TTrvnoo 


15 00 


12 00 


5 00 


6 00 


6 00 


2 00 


Piney Grove 


20 00 


35 00 


6 00 


18 00 


30 00 


5 00 


















15 00 


8 00 


3 00 


5 00 


18 00 


3 00 


Rich Fork 


7 00 


8 00 


3 00 


3 50 


7 00 


2 00 




3 50 


3 50 


1 50 


2 50 


3 50 


1 50 


Summersville 
















1 50 


*3 00 


50 


50 


1 50 


1 00 


Thomasville 


2 00 


3 00 


1 00 


2 00 


3 00 


1 00 


Totals 


251 25 


240 75 


81 50 


126 00 


237 50 


45 00 



S88U9dxg[ 

looqog 




• CM O OS LO 

• OS lO rH 


11 00 
104 13 

3 53 
23 00 










12 85 


8 

CO 


8^ 

00 lO 




O fc- 

o o 

CO LO 


182 36 


qooqog uiojj 
scusi^d'Bg 
















CM 
CO 


OS 


CO ■ 






OS 

H/l 


"GOlTBpuO^y 


LO 
CO 


CO 10 o <c *o 

t— i lO CO CO CO 


■ LO 

• CO 






LO 
CM 


CO o o 

LO O LO 
CM rH 


O LO o 

LO CO HH 


LO LO 

CM CM 


10381 


'118(10 

^de^i sq^uoj\[ 




Oi CM <M - 


• CM • 








CM OS CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 








co o 

CM CM 
i—l 


O CM 
LO lO 


O O LC o 
O O IS o 

i— 1 CO rH 








O lO o 
OS CO CM 
CM H rH 


8 


** 
tH 


co co 

CO LO 


17481 






• o 

• o 


LO 

r> • 


o o 
o o 

■ I—l I—l 








o • 
■ o • 


o o 

LC HH • 






LO 
CO 

LO 


S[Ooqog 

jaqcunj^ 








•NHri 








• CM rH 






rH 


-H 






I>- CO 

CM CO 


rH GO 
CO CO 


LO OS CO o 
O CO CM OS 
Hf)H 








CO rH CO 

co co t— 

CM rH 


tH LO CO 
00 LO LO 


Tt< CO 
Hi LO 


1817-1 


■sj.^|oqog 

aeqcanj^ 


o> 

CO 


CM CO 
CM CM 
rH 


CO CM 
LO CO 


i— to LO CO 
OS CO t-h 

CM i-i 




• CM 

• CO 


O OS o 

CM rH 


LO 00 o 

HH LO 


O O 
H< LO 


1674 


•sjeqo^BjL 
pui3 sjoogjo 


CO 


LO t>- 


LO CO 


CO CO CM 
<M tH 








CO CM CO CO i> CO 


HH O 


co 



t 

© 

32 

GC 



CP 

> S 

o o 



p. 



x 



S c ffi cp^ 



33 hJ 



CP rrj 

s G 

| d 

ari - 

C o +^ 



Mo 



• 0) 

• > 

03 

SH 

o 
id 

;_cp 
£ 

02 

s 



H 

CP 

W 

of 
be 

CP 



CP . 
'-> . 
o . 
__l 



m 3 j° ffl 2 

o ^ CP 



CP 



00 CP c „ 



H^ 

m 

£ fl G 

CP 

w 



5 O c3 -g B. 

^ • • ° 



o 
c 

£ . . 

CP CP g 

B 



03 

O cp 

^ Hj 



OS 



o 

02 co a 
^ CP S 

cp S -H 
cp c3 

P^^fH 



cp £ 



02 



02 



o . 

CP^ 



cp 75= -e 



K/ O O O a2 S<|CQ 
CP CP CP ^ P ■ • 

o o o . o 

r-i }Zi fZJ ft hh r5 r-^ 



m O feH O *3 
CP . . . 

H 55 Ph' ^ O 



o . . 



03 



|-ill||-§| 



• 0D 

bf 

• a 



fH 02 

S CP 



CP 



d 

g-n cp^ p,'C M . ^ m-S 



> O 

PPh 



CP ■ 

a s i 

r— ^ w w "^-, L _, 5 5 © ^ J2J UH U J 1 * ^3 ^.S.Sr^l CU-r-J^ H 03^H 



^5 03 
CP CP 3 
G d CP 



w : ^ 

S : 2 

O O OS 

02 Ph 

™-i CP 

a 

8 o o 



• CP 

• > 

^ O CP 
02 02 



OiOl>»HOOO©HlOM.MO 
1—1 rH CO HH 



ssoq 



u ^0 



O07M • Tfi f> 



CM • 



p8pn[0xg[ 



Xq sid 



CO • O CO 00 i— i 



Aq p,08H 



hfl © 

3 2 

CD S3 

a o 

CO © 

EH Q 
Q03 



o 
g c 

£ 0> ® 

2©S « 

bo ^ > 
e« h " — 

m «>© - 

, a OQ OC 

§ g 

O u 

£^WP3 



© £ be 

o\s c e c 

— 1 CO •— CD 

if**'* 



bC 03 o3 c . _ 
a © © © • o3 

•C >J >( E £ 

©-*i +a 5 ■ _© 
(70 co co ce -— — 

jS 8 8 J §8 | 

1 . 8 . § 2 « » o 

T 1 +2 ^ *= c -G 
h-i c3 o3 o3 ; ■>-' o3 t_ 
« -p b> +i P 

jTgo co go > a: , 

03 ^ g 

S • • - CD . o 

© o ©^ o . 



• CD 03 

.co^ 1 
: a * 



cc 



CO 



cc . o3 M 
§ CD CO .« 

.g* © 

— o > 



ft 

COJBJS 

| £-03 q I 

O .2 CD 
^.C3 ffi 



-c o 

— ■ % t>> - 

rg CD cd cy © 



ft' 

. . o . 

^p^nno^o^ 



S3 



a • 
«S 

© CD 
r© <m 



a o 

© © 

OQ 



S BE ' 

ill 

2 © "3 
OKI 



13 

© • 
"8>>N 



■ QQ ■ 

• be ■ e 
m.S : o 



. . . c3 



ax 



©^i ft'C . 

§3 ©.-2.2,2^^ 



©o3 . . 
55 O C Ph Ph Ph 



o3 

-a 



> o 



2? 



© 

G © 



o © 



©.a 
MP3 



© 

o 
«- : 

.» © 

© a 



0Q 



% «8 

£ B 

03 «C 
Eh Eh 



HOCOMOCON -COO 
CO <M CN CO OCO • <N CO 

cni i— i t-h • co o> 



ON1C 
O 1-1 CM 

10 cm co 



CO CO OS Oi •>* CO 
O i> OS rH CS OS 

O) — H THrH 



t-i • (M N t- 



•s^atqo^qiO 



•sjooqo^ 



OS) 

a 

CI 

a 



suoissip\[ 



OO O CC H (N N 



•suoissip\[ 



SU01SSIJ\[ 



■8[^U8piOUI 



§8 

O lO 



3 ^SEJ 



OOtOlO 
lO o l> t>- 

1-1 LO 



8S 



- -a r\ &: 



03 ° 2! - 
3 S3 

• £ • 

- >-5l-S»-S 



a £ ° 
cxa: h 



CD . 

„ CO 2 

2~ § a 



O c * 

Ja g ® 



«J5 



*s -*= a 

h h h 6 >< ■« « r/"> ^ 



o o o 



CD 



<x> o 



H'Jg^^K ^ ^ y ± y - ^ - y ~ -a 



£ d" a a 
= » *f ra 

rt Sh? aw 

o a? • cd^j 



4) 
CD 

u of* 

^ ,a a a 

rQ co <d 03 £ a n 



»—i CO 



^a°t^ 



o ~ 

jjp «5 - - 
u £ ^ u 

(-5 (-5 1^ (J |_5 



«S a 



a^ 
c3 S 



CO 

O 

CD co 
> O co 
Ofe p 



CD 

o » o « 



p 

cl.a 1 - 

-a 

^ 2 O O P-i PS « do m H Eh 



CD 



O co 



« CO or, 

Fh c3 



1 niNUTES 1 



Seventy-First Annual Session 



OE 



Liberty Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



FINE MEETINC HOUSE CHURCH, 



HELD 



August 23d, 24th and 2sth,'i904. 



NASH BROS, 
BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTERS, 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. . 



L 1904. 1 



/niNUTES 

OF THE 

Seventy-First Annual Session 

OF 

Liberty Baptist Association 

HELD "WITH 

FINE MEETINC HOUSE CHURCH, 

HELD 

August 23d, 24th and 25m i 904. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION: 

Moderator: James Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk : ITenry Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer: S. H. Averitt, Thomasville, N.C 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER FOR NEXT 
SESSION ; 

The next session of Liberty Association will convene with the church 
at New Friendship, Forsythe county, four miles south of Winston-Salem, 
on Tuesday after the third Sunday in August 1905, Elder John E. Miller 
to preach the introductory sermon; Elder John A Summey, alternate. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION, 
AUGUST, 1904. 



Adderton, W. S, ..... .■ Denton, N. C. 

Boone, J. B . . . Thomasville, N. C. 

Harrill, George P • Thomasville, N. C 

Lanning, Jeff • • ■ • • • Denton, N. C. 

Leach, M.J • ....... ••• Lassiter, N. C. 

Miller, John R • • • • ■ Thomasville, N. C. 

Morton, H. • Thomasville, K C. 

Newton, J. D .. Thomasville, N. C. 

Sheets, Henry • Lexington, N. C. 

Smith, W A • • • • ■ Lexington, K C. 

Stoker, Ambrose P Denton, N C. 

Summey , John A • • Hannersville, N. O 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

R. S. Green, Jr., James Smith, William Bowers, 

W. C. Roach, CM. Wall. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Pine Meeting House Baptist Church, 

August 23, 1904. 

Liberty Baptist Association met to-day with this church 
in its seventy-first annual session. The introductory sermon 
was preached by Elder Geo. P. Harrill from Hebrews iv:6. 

Intermission for Dinner. 

At 2 o'clock p. m. the Moderator called the body to order 
and Elder J. S. Farmer read the Scriptures and led in 
prayer. 

The Moderator appointed Elders J. D. Newton and W. A. 
Smith as Reading Clerks. 

The letters were handed in and names of Messengers en- 
rolled as follows : 

Abbott's Creek— N. R. Teague. 

Asbeboro — Not represented. 

Center Cross — By letter. 

Denton — W. B. Thompson. 

Gravel Hill— W. D. Loflin and E. M. Russell. 

Holloway's — J. F. Carrick, B. R. Cross and J. A. Carrick. 

Huldah — Not represented. 

Jackson's Creek — Not represented. 

Jersey— W. F. Miller, W. C. Roach and Geo. W. Palmer. 

Lexington — Oscar Sink and G. F. Hankins. 

Liberty — J. M. Easter and L. E. Hepler. 

Lick Creek — P. M. Snider, Clay Rush and John W. Cole. 

Maple Springs — Not reported. 

Marion — By letter. 

Mt. Lebanon — M. J. Leach. 

New Friendship — A. P. Snider. 

Oak Hill— By letter. 

Orphanage — George P. Harrill, Archibald Johnson and 
S. H. Averitt. 

Pine Meeting House — S. E. Simeson, W. H. Barnes and 
R. H. Lomax. 

Piney Grove — George W. Wall, J. Ezra Motsinger and 
E. L. Green. 

Reed's Cross Roads — E. E. Jenkins, C. A. Snider and 
J. L. Myers. 

Rich Fork — R. S. Green, Jr., and William Bowers. 
Stoner's Grove — B. F. Roach and L. C. Lomax. 



4 



Summerville — Not represented. 
Taylor's Grove — John Rodgers. 
Thomasville— W. G. Fitzgerald. 

After enrollment of Messengers, the body proceeded to 
the election of officers for the ensuing year, which resulted 
in the re-election of the present officers, viz.: Moderator, 
James Smith; Clerk, Henry Sheets; Treasurer, S. H. 
Averitt. 

Invitations to Visiting Brethren. 

The following brethren reported and were welcomed to 
seats in the body: Elder Hight C. Moore, Sunday School 
Secretary of the Baptist State Convention; Elder J. S. Far- 
mer, of the Biblical Recorder; Elder S F. Conrad, of the 
North Carolina Baptist; Elder W. H. Rich, pastor of First 
Baptist church, Salisbury. Prof. E. L. Green, Principal of 
Liberty Association High School, was recognized. 

The following named brethren were appointed on Order 
of Business: W. A. Smith, John R. Miller and R. S. 
Green, Jr. 

The following report was handed in: 

Order of Business — Wednesday. 

Religious exercises, 9:30 to 10. 
State Missions, 10 to 11. 
Sunday Schools, 11 to 11:30. 
Foreign Missions, 11:30 to 12:30. 
Orphanage, 2:30 to 3:15. 
Temperance, 3:15 to 4:00. 

Thursday Morning. 

Devotional exercises, 9:30 to 10:10. 
Ministers' Relief, 10:00 to 10:45. 
Home Missions, 10:45 to 11:30. 
Obituaries, 11:30 to 12:00. 
Miscellaneous, 12:00. 
The report was adopted. 

The following brethren were appointed as a Committee on 
Finance, viz.: G. W. Wall and John W. Cole. 
Elder Henry Sheets read the following 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The importance of reading good literature can hardly be estimated. Our 
people become well informed and efficient in the Lord's work in proportion 
as they read wisely. As Baptists, claiming what we do, we can afford least 
of all people, to not be informed. The Bible and Baptist periodicals are 
our main source of information. To North Carolina Baptists, the Biblical 



Recorder, being the acknowledged organ of the denomination, appeals 
most strongly to each and every Baptist home in the State. It has always 
been true to Bible doctrine and has stood in the forefront of every aggress- 
ive movement for the right of our people and the upbuilding of our de- 
nominational interests. 

The North Carolina Baptist, known to all our people, is a live, wide-awake 
paper. It too, stands for all our denominational interests. For ten years 
or more, it has been a recognized force in North Carolina, standing for the 
abolition of the liquor traffic everywhere. Its coming will prove a blessing 
to any home. 

Charity and Children fills its own place. No other paper could do its 
work. To read it carefully is to keep well posted as to every phase of our 
Orphanage work. Our children need it. We all need it. Be wise, sub- 
scribe for it, then read it 

The Foreign Mission Journal, published at Richmond, will keep our peo- 
ple well informed as to our foreign mission work. Take it. 

Our Home Field, the organ of the Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga. 
This tells all about our home mission work. Nearly ever Baptist could 
take and read all these. Know your duty and do it. 

Henry Sheets, 
C. M. Wall. 

This report was discussed by Brethren J. S. Farmer, for 
the Biblical Recorder; S. F. Conrad, for the North Carolina 
Baptist, and G. P. Harrill spoke on the importance of read- 
ing religious literature, in a general way. 

The report was then adopted. 

On motion, the Association adjourned until to-morrow 
morning, 9:30. 

Benediction by Elder Hight C. Moore. 

Wednesday Morning, August 24th. 

Religious exercises were conducted by Elder Hight C. 
Moore. 

At 10:00 o'clock the Moderator called the body to order. 
Minutes of yesterday were read and approved. 

After some routine work, Elder W. A. Smith read the 
following 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

We note with gratitude to God the steady and substantial progress of 
our State Mission work. We now have 103 missionaries working in thirty- 
five of the fifty-nine Associations in the State. Two thousand, two hun- 
dred and fifty-eight members were received into our mission churches last 
year; one thousand, two hundred and seventeen of whom were received 
by baptism. $6,809.68 more was raised on mission fields last year for the 
support of the objects of the Convention than in the preceding year. 

We heartily endorse the State Mission Board and its work, and recom- 
mend to our churches that they give to same their liberal support. 

We desire especially to express our satisfaction at tiie management of 
the Sunday School department of the Board's work. We believe the hand 
of God was in the selection of the scholarly and consecrated Hight C. 
Moore to prosecute this important work. We are also pleased to observe 
that, from present prospects, this part of the work will be self sustaining. 

$26,302.80 was the amount contributed to State Missions last year. 
There was raised on mission fields, for all objects, last year $34,769. Our 



6 



Association receives more money from the State Mission Board than it 
puts into its treasury. This ought to incite us to go forward in State Mis- 
sions that we may have a part in this work beyond our own bounds. 

Respectfully submitted, W. A. Smith, 

W. C. Barnes 

After the reading of the above report, Elder Hight C. 
Moore read the 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The Sunday School is the church engaged in studying and teaching the 
Scriptures. It is a popular and powerful agency for the dissemination of 
truth, the winning of souls, and the training of christians; in short, it is 
set for the betterment of humanity and the glory of God. Operating under 
the authority of Scripture and at a strategic point in the life and activity 
of the churches it is entitled to the endorsement, the sympathy, and the 
hearty co-operation of all servants of God everywhere. 

In North Carolina the Baptists have a few more than 1,300 Sunday 
Schools, with nbout 9,000 officers and teachers and a total enrolment of 
96,000. A fine army, and yet we have 1,792 churches with a membership 
of more than 182,000. So we need more and larger Sunday Schools; and 
certainly the present Sunday School condition needs improvement in ma- 
terial equipment, teacher-training, general efficiency and accomplishment. 
To this task we as a denomination have set our hands afresh and there are 
indications of a revival of interest in the teaching work of our churches. 
In our own Association there are evidences of Sunday School progress, the 
figures in the church letters being more encouraging than those of last 
year. 

As a further incentive to renewed endeavor in this work during the com- 
ing year we beg to recommend: 

1. That our fifth Sunday meeting in the Spring be devoted to a consid- 
eration of Sunday School topics. 

2. That a committee of three be appointed who shall stimulate Sunday 
School work in the Association in every way possible, especially by organ- 
izing schools, extending the terms of schools not evergreen, arranging for 
rallies and institutes, seeing that every school is reported to the Associa- 
tion; this committee to present a report of its work at our next session. 

8. That we endorse the forward Sunday School movement inaugurated 
by our State Convention and that we urge all our Sunday Schools to make 
at least one offering during the year for our Baptist Sunday School work 
in North Carolina. 

Hight C. Moore, 
P. M. Snider. 

These excellent reports were spoken to by W. A. Smith, 
Hight C. Moore, W. H. Rich and S. F. Conrad. 

After interesting speeches on the above reports had been 
made, the reports were heartily adopted. 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Benediction by Hight C. Moore. 

Afternoon Session, August 24th. 

The Association re-assembled. Led in prayer by W. A. 
Smith. 

The Moderator appointed the following brethren as a 
committee, as recommended in the Sunday school report 



7 



above, to look after the Sunday school work in the Liberty 
Association, viz.: Archibald Johnson, W. A. Smith and G. 
P. Harrill. 

Elder G. P. Harrill read the following 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

In 1845, when the Southern Baptist Convention was organized at Au- 
gusta, Ga., there was appointed a committee, known as the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board, to advise, direct, and collect funds for carrying on the work of 
missions in foreign countries. This committee, elected by the messengers 
we send to the Southern Baptist Convention, consists at present of twenty 
one members, with headquarters at Richmond, Virginia. 

We are now carrying on mission work in seven foreign countries. The 
work was begun in China during the first year of the organization of the 
Southern Baptist Convention by the appointment of J. L. Shuck as mis- 
sionary. Five years later, in 1850, the work was begun in Africa by T. 
J. Bowen. This was the first work done by appointment of the Board in 
Africa, but the First Baptist Church of Richmond, Va., had sent two col- 
ored missionaries there as early as 1820. J. Q. Rohrer and wife were ap- 
pointed missionaries to Japan in 1860, and began the work that moved so 
slowly for a while, but is now, even during the fierce struggle between 
Japan and Russia, prospering gloriously. Italy was the first Roman Cath- 
olic country to which we have sent missionaries. The work was begun 
there in 1870 by the appointment of W. N. Cote, who was both preacher 
and doctor. The next Roman Catholic country to be entered by our mis- 
sionaries was Mexico. This was done by sending J. O. Westrup, William 
Flo .rney and W. D. Powell in 1880. There had been an attempt to begin 
work in Brazil before 1882, but it was in this year that the work was per- 
manently begun by W. B. Bagby. Last September, 1903, work was be- 
gun in the Argentine Republic by S. M. Sowell. Persia as a mission field 
has been in the minds of some brethren for quite a number of years, but 
so far the members of the Board do not think it wise to begin the work 
there. 

The past year has been a very successful one, so far as we can judge, in 
Foreign Mission work, there being over two thousand baptized by our 
missionaries — 280 more than were baptized the previous year. 

Since the Southern Baptist Convention, assembled in Nashville last May, 
voted to try to increase the contributions to Foreign Missions twenty-five 
per cent, your committee recommend that we try to raise the contributions 
of the Liberty Association to a corresponding increase, 

Respectfully submitted, G. P. Harrill. 

The report was spoken to by G. P. Harrill anrj W. H. 
Rich. 

The following resolution, supplementary to the above 
report, was read by Bro. Archibald Johnson: 

Resolved, That the Woman's Missionary Societies of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation have been greatly helpful in increasing our contributions and in 
strengthening the mission spirit. We urge our sisters in the churches 
without a Woman's Missionary Society to organize as soon as possible, 
pledging the moral support of the Association to every such organization. 

As further supplementary, J. D. Newton offered the fol- 
lowing: 

Resolved, That we, the Messengers of the Liberty Association, will con- 
tribute of our means for the building of the Yates Memorial College in 



8 



China, and that we will urge upon our brethren and sisters of our churches 
to do likewise. 

The report was then adopted. 

The Moderator was at this time informed of the presence 
of Elder N. S. Jones, representing the College for Women 
at Raleigh, and Bro. James A. Reid, of the South Yadkin 
Association, who were recognized and invited to seats with 
us. 

Brother R. S. Green, Jr., read the 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

The work of the Baptist people is largely a work of education. Our 
cause is mainly dependent on the mental, moral and spiritual training of 
our people, and especially is this so of the ministry. Public schools are 
and of necessity must continue to be the base of our education. Hence 
we advocate a liberal support and patronage of the same. A better 
equipped body of teachers is demanded. We heartily favor the work of 
all our schools for higher education. We feel proud of our schools in this 
Association, especially so of our school at Wallburg. With her past suc- 
cess to encourage us, we feel sure with a new music teacher and dormitory 
this school will press onward to much usefulness. We should not be sat- 
isfied short of the very best equipped ministry; hence every opportunity 
should be given our young men to prepare themselves for their work. 
This should be given freely for the cause's sake and for the upbuilding of 
our Master's kingdom on earth. Let our aim and purpose be to give our 
children the very best opportunity to prepare themselves for life's work. 
God grant that the Baptists may ever be in the forefront in education here 
in North Carolina. R. S. Green, Jr., 

R. K. Williams. 

This able and interesting report was discussed by N. S*. 
Jones, R. S. Green, Jr., Prof. E. L. Green, J. M. Bennett and 
W. A. Smith, after which pledges were taken and the report 
adopted. 

Elder S. F. Conrad read for the committee the 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Twenty-three years ago the question of Prohibition was submitted to 
and voted upon by the whole State Only one county at that time gave a 
majority for the measure. Since that time there has been a very great 
growth in temperance sentiment, and a large number of the largest coun- 
ties have abolished the licensed sale of liquor. Among these we mention 
the great counties of Cleveland, Cabarrus, Gaston, Union, Robeson, Ruth- 
erford, Sampson, Cumberland, Pender, Onslow, Duplin, Harnett, Scotland, 
Columbus and Chatham. Under the recent laws of the State more than 
two-thirds of the entire State have become Prohibition counties. Many of 
the largest towns, by a vote of the people, have voted out the saloons. 
We mention among these Charlotte. Greensboro, Durham, Goldsboro, 
Newbern, Wadesboro and Statesville, while Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville 
and Kinston have adopted dispensaries as the lesser evil. 

We are glad to note that this great reformation is due to the attitude of 
the Christian people and the growth of the temperance sentiment in the 
State. The evils of the liquor traffic are becoming better understood, and 
its demoralizing and destructive work has become so manifest that the 
people are seeing and feeling the necessity of outlawing the business as 



9 



fraught with such general harm to the public as to be entirely suppressed. 
Nineteen gallons of intoxicants are consumed annually for every man, 
woman and child in the nation. Eighty thousand of our citizenship are 
destroyed annually by the business, and one out of every five of the young 
men of our land are drafted in every year to fill up the depleted army of 
dram-drinkers and drunkards. Seventy-five per cent, of the orphans in 
our asylums are there from liquor. Seventy -five per cent, of the convicts 
in our penitentiaries are there from liquor, and from 85 to 90 per cent, of 
all the crime before the criminal courts is from liquor. We believe it 
would be wise to abolish it from the whole State, and we therefore recom- 
mend to our people to use their endeavors to have such a constitutional 
amendment submitted to the people of the State. We also urge our peo- 
ple to withhold their suffrages from men who are the avowed advocates of 
the liquor traffic. John A. Summby. 

John A. Carrick. 

Owing to the lateness of the hour, Bro. Conrad only- 
spoke in support of this able and important report. It was 
then adopted. 

The committee to name the Executive Board reported 
the following named brethren: R. S. Green, Jr., James 
Smith, William Bowers, W. C. Roach and C. M. Wall. 

The Committee on Place and Preacher for next session 
recommended New Friendship as the place and Elder John 
R. Miller as the preacher; alternate, Elder John A. Sum- 
mey. 

The following resolution was introduced by Elder J. D. 
Newton: 

Resolved, That we, the Messengers of the Liberty Association, will con- 
tribute of our means for the building of the Yates Memorial College in 
China, and that we will urge upon our brethren and sisters of our churches 
to do likewise. 

On motion, adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9:30 
o'clock. 

Thursday Morning, August 25th. 

Religious exercises were conducted by W. A. Smith. 

The Moderator appointed the following named brethren 
as a committee to name the Trustees of Liberty Association 
High School, located at Wallburg, viz.: J. A. Summey, G. 
P. Harrill and Henry Sheets. 

The committees named below are to write reports on the 
subjects to which their names are attached for next year: 

On State Missions — G. P. Harrill and P. M. Snider. 

On Home Missions — John R. Miller and R. S. Green, Jr. 

On Foreign Missions — W. A. Smith and George W. Wall. 

On Periodicals — John A. Summey and S. A. Hege. 

On Education — E. L. Green and William Bowers. 

On Orphanage — S. H. Averitt and A. R. Craver. 



10 



On Sunday Schools — W. C. Barnes and G. W. Palmer. 

On Ministers' Relief — Jeff. Lanning and John A. Carrick. 

On Temperance — J. D. Newton and Oscar Bowers. 

On Obituaries — J. M. Bennett and' J, L. Myers. 

The committee appointed to recommend names of Trus- 
tees for our High School, on behalf of the Association 
recommended the following named brethren: W. A. Smith, 
R. S. Green, Jr., Archibald Johnson and P. M. Snider. 

N. R. Teague read the 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RELIEF. 

While all the objects of our Convention are of great importance, there 
is none more worthy than that of caring for the old and worn-out minis- 
ters, who have labored at a very small salary, making it impossible to lay 
up for old age. While some may receive help who are not worthy, yet 
for the sake of the faithful, or rather for the sake of Him who has said 
that they who preach the Gospel shall live of the Gospel. — I Cor. ix:14. 
So, then, shall not our churches contribute liberally for this object? 

N. R. Teague. 

The report was discussed by N. R. Teague, W. A. Smith, 
G. P. Harrill and John A. Summey. 

Pledges were then taken for the support of this board, 
after which it was adopted. 

John K. Miller read the 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

OUR AUTHORITY FOR ORPHANAGE WORK. 

The day has passed in North Carolina when it is necessary for us to dis- 
cuss the authority we have in the Scriptures for orphanage work. Although 
denominational orphanages are of recent origin, yet the principles upon 
which they are founded — that of ministering to the needs of the father- 
less — are as old as the teachings of Jesus. And we are forced to conclude 
that Christians in all ages of the world, as individuals, in a greater or less 
degree, have tried to live up to the teachings of our Lord in visiting the 
fatherless and widows in their afflictions. 

ORGANIZATION. 

But not until late in the nineteenth century did we get hold of the idea 
of co operation by which we might more effectually carry out and obey 
the teachings of our Master. The modern orphanage, then, is an institu- 
tion through which Christian people put their hearts and hands together, 
that by combined effort they may have greater strength to do this part of 
the Lord's work. 

growth. 

The growth of orphanage work has been wonderful: perhaps no other 
department of Christian effort has made greater advancement during the 
last two decades. The growth of our own institution, the orphanage at 
Thomasville, should be a joy and inspiration to us all. Now with eight 
dormitory buildings, which accommodate about three hundred children, 
auother under course of construction, and perhaps another new building 
to be added and one of the old ones to be remodeled and enlarged, is the 
prospect for the coming year. Besides this, almost enough money ha3 
been given to build a common dining hall and a library. We can not but 



11 



recognize that God is moving His people to provide homes for the home- 
less. 

GREATER GIFTS NEEDED. 

Now, the burden to feed and clothe these children rests upon the Baptists 
of North Carolina. There must be increased gifts in proportion to the 
increased needs of our orphanage. Possibly before we meet again in this 
Association there will be four hundred children in our orphanage at Thom- 
asville. Brethren! they are our children; God has given them into our 
care; they are to us as representatives of Jesus Christ, to whom we can 
give food, clothing and care, and have the blessed assurance that in so 
doing we are ministering unto Him. (Matt. xxv:40). 

PRAYER. 

We should also pray for our orphanage; just as we pray for ourselves 
and our own children we should pray for these children and those who care 
for them. When we give to State, Home and Foreign Missions we need 
to accompany our gifts with our prayers that God's blessings may rest 
upon them. Then let us not forget to remember the Orphanage in our 
prayers, that God will bless both the givers and the given, and that His 
name may be glorified in all our efforts for the advancement of His king- 
dom. John R Miller. 

John R. Miller and Archibald Johnson spoke ably to this 
fine report. Then the largest pledge ever made by the 
Association to this work was then made. It is hoped that 
the Liberty Association will continue to go forward in be- 
half of this great work. 

The following report was read by Bro. Archibald Johnson 
for Pastor Lanning, who was detained at home on account 
of sickness in his family: 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Our object in Home Missions is to give the Gospel to destitute sections 
of the Southern States that can not be reached by State Foreign Missions. 
Our own State has been receiving help from the Home Board for many 
years. We deem no object more important and more worthy of our sup- 
port than Home Missions. The truth, as we hold it, has been established 
in many of our Southern cities, and many strong churches have been built 
as a result of the work of this Board that are doing much to spread the 
kingdom of God all over the world. We may look more especially to the 
Home Board than to any other for the maintenance and propagation of the 
true doctrines of the Gospel. This Board lays strong claims upon us, and 
there is every reason why we should increase our contribution and give it 
our hearty support. 

Within the bounds of the Home field there are over 12,000,000 uncon- 
verted souls, and this number will grow larger every year because of 
immigration into this section of our country. The field is large, the work 
is abundant and exceedingly important. We therefore recommend enlarge- 
ment in our pledges to Home Missions. Jeff. Lanning. 

After speeches by Archibald Johnson and John R. Miller, 
pledges were taken for next year's work and the report was 
adopted. 

Pastor George P. Harrill suggested that the body now 
offer prayer for Bro. Lanning and family on account of 



12 



sickness which kept him away. Pastor John R. Miller led 
in prayer. 

As no written report on obituaries was submitted, pastors 
and others reported the following who had died since our 
last session, viz.: C. C. Carrick, George W. Miller, Sr., Elder 
N. B. Orrell and James N. Conrad. 

The committee to solicit funds for the publication of the 
History of Liberty Association and to arrange for its publi- 
cation, consisting of George P. Harrill, John R. Miller and 
C. M. Wall, was continued from last year; and it is expected 
that the book will be ready for delivery before the end of 
the year. 

Delegates were appointed: 

To the Southern Baptist Convention — Archibald Johnson; 
alternate, John R. Miller. 

To the Baptist State Convention— C. M. Wall, Z. T. 
Sharpe, John R. Miller, J. B. Boone, Jesse L. Myers and 
Henry Sheets. 

Associational representative of the Board of State Mis- 
sions — C. M. Wall, with his expenses paid for one trip to 
Raleigh. 

It was reported that probably next year a fireproof build- 
ing would be begun at our Baptist Orphanage at Thomas- 
ville. 

The resolution which follows was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That a committee be appointed to report at our next session on 
the state of the c hurches. 

The following named brethren are appointed, viz.: J. D. 
Newton, John A. Summey and Henry Sheets. 

Bro. Archibald Johnson offered the resolution which fol- 
lows: 

Resolved, That the Woman's Missionary Societies of the Liberty Associa- 
tion have been greatly helpful in increasing our contributions and in 
strengthening the mission spirit. We urge our sisters in the churches 
without a Woman's Missionary Society to organize as soon as possible, 
pledging the moral support of the Association to every such organization. 

The earnest desire was expressed that all of our churches 
have such a society. Those formed are doing a great work. 
The following report was read and adopted: 



13 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR 1903 AND 1904. 



RECEIPTS. 

Slate Missions — 

From Finance Committee $ 13 65 

Liberty Union 10 49 

From Churches 89 07 



Total $113 21 

Foreign Missions — 

From Finance Committee 17 14 

From Liberty Union 8 24 

From Churches 63 50 



Total 88 88 

Home Missions — 

From Finance Committee 10 70 

From Liberty Union 8 24 

From Churches 41 31 



Total 60 25 

Education — 

From Finance Committee 15 10 

From Liberty Union 10 49 

From Churches 46 51 



Total 72 10 

Ministerial Relief— 

From Finance Committee 13 22 

From Liberty Union 3 00 

From Churches 9 24 



Total 25 46 

Minute Fund — 

From Finance Committee 20 69 

From Churches 3 62 



Total 24 31 



Total for all objects 384 21 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

State J^i/SsioTis 

Paid to Watters Durham, Treas .... $106 94 

Paid to Rev. L. Johnson, Sec'y 6 27 

Total $113 21 

Foreign Missions — 

Paid to Watters Durham, Treas 88 88 

Home Missions — 

Paid to Watters Durham, Treas. ... 60 25 

Education — 

Paid to Watters Durham, Treas. ... 45 10 

Paid to Rev. R. T. Vann 27 00 

Total 72 10 

Ministerial Relief — 

Paid to Watters Durham, Treas 25 46 

$£vftiitc FvbTl$i 

Paid to Rev. Henry Sheets, Clerk. . 24 31 

Total for all objects 384 21 

S. H. Averitt, Treasurer. 



14 



The Clerk was appointed to superintend the printing and 
distribution of the Minutes. On motion, he was allowed 
$10.00 for the service. 

The following was offered by George P. Harrill: 

We, the delegates and visitors to the Liberty Association, desire to 
express our gratitude to the Pine Meeting House brethren, sisters and 
others in the community for their kind hospitality during the session of the 
Association. 

A hearty vote expressed the thanks of all who attended. 

Two Woman's Missionary Societies have reported: 

Lexington — Miss Roxie Sheets, President, Lexington, N. 
C, with an enrollment of 33 members. This active, ener- 
getic body of women has contributed to various objects 
during the year just closed the neat sum of $92.60. 

Thomasville — Mrs. G. P. Harrill, President, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. This young society reports a membership of 
30, and though but a few months old, its vigor is indicated 
in its gifts, amounting to $42.70. Well done. 

May these active societies be an inspiration to the women 
in other churches to go and do likewise. 

Thomasville reports a Sunbeam Society, Miss Lettie 
Green, President, Thomasville, N. C. It has a membership 
of 53, and has contributed in a few months $6.98. 

Lexington has a Sunbeam Society with 30 members, 
Miss Alma Owen, President, Lexington, N. C. This body 
of young folks has contributed this year $24.00*. 

Lexington has just organized a Baptist Young People's 
Union. Bro. B. F. Ausband is president. This union has 
enrolled a membership of 37. 

Thus closed one of the best sessions of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation. While some of our churches did not report, there 
are evident signs of a spirit to go on to a greater and nobler 
work. The Holy Spirit was with us during this session. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at New Friendship on 
Tuesday after the third Sunday in August, 1905. 

Prayer by Henry Sheets. 



Henry Sheets, 

Clerk. 



James Smith, 

Moderator. 



15 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 





niTT T r ) ( *<. ITT? Q 


State Miss. 


Home Miss. 


Foreign Miss. 


Orphanage. 


Ministerial 
Education. 


Ministers' 

R. Fund. 


Minute Fund. 












1!^ on 




CDO OA 
















t|)U OU 

1 00 


JpU ou 
3 50 


<J>U OU 


<pl uu 
4 91 


ou 
2 00 


dt>n £A 

fU oU 
3 00 


15 
1 22 

1 00 

2 00 








60 






7 80 


1 17 


70 








Jackson's Creek 
























3 07 
3 00 
71 
1 31 




















5 00 
4 80 


1 00 
8 00 


10 50 


3 00 
2 40 


1 50 
1 20 




8 00 




















20 
30 

1 50 
25 

2 00 
2 00 

2 oa 

2 28 
1 00 
75 




2 50 


1 00 


4 00 


1 25 




1 00 






Oak Hill 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 
















































Rich Fork 






















4 56 




1 50 


























50 
1. 00 

2 88 
















Public collection Minute 
Fund 














Totals 














13 60 


15 80 


14 50 


31 02 


14 07 


9 40 


31 42 





Respectfully submitted. 

George W. Wall, 
John W. Cole. 



16 



TABLE OF PLEDGES FOR 1904-1905. 

















a 
















CO 

&*) 


a 




cc 




s 




a 










CHURCHES 


o3 
C 




i 




ii 




a 




.2 




CO . 


15 








C! 

O 




03 




CO 

s 

o 




>reig 


luca 




inist 
rtei 


Act 1 CI 

iiais. 






H 
O 




CO 




~- 








& 




— 




u 
H 




xlDUUll S Vjl ecu . . . ,. . . 


$18 


00 


$13 


00 


<J)0 


00 


$11 


00 


$5 


00 


$4 


00 


$56 


on 
uu 






ou 




50 




50 




50 


1 


00 




50 


3 


50 




12 


00 


g 


00 


3 


50 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


50 


32 


00 


^ 1 TTill 


6 


00 


o 


oO 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


AA 


1 


50 


18 


00 


TTol lnwfl v' « 


OA 


00 


16 


00 




00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


61 


50 


Huldah 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


6 


00 


Jackson's Creek 


2 


00 






1 


00 










1 


00 


4 


00 


Lexington 


21 


00 




no 

UU 





ccn 
ou 


19 


00 


'8 




2 


50 


76 


uu 


60 


00 


45 


00 


25 


00 


62 


50 


15 


00 


5 


00 


212 


50 


Liberty ..... 


12 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


11 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


38 


50 


Lick Creek 


15 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


45 


50 


Maple Spring 




























































































2 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


11 


00 


New Friendship 


30 


00 


11 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


61 


50 


Oak Hill 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 








50 


7 


50 


Orphanage 


100 


00 


50 


00 


30 


00 


40 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


245 


00 


Pine M. House 


20 


00 


15 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


57 


00 


Reed's Cross Roads . . . 


25 


00 


35 


00 


18 


00 


35 


00 


6 


50 


5 


00 


124 


50 


20 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


3 


oo 


3 


00 


61 


00 


Rich Fork 


8 


00 


9 


00 


3 


50 


9 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


34 


50 




4 


50 


4 


00 


2 


75 


3 


50 


1 


50 




75 


17 


00 
































Taylor's Grove. . .... 


1 


50 


3 


00 




50 


1 


50 




50 


1 


00 


8 


00 


Thomasville 


6 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


6 


oo 


1 


00 


1 


00 


24 


00 


Totals 


387 


50 


266 


50 


138 


25 


274 


00 


88 


50 


49 


75 


1204 


50 































'S9SH8CIX3 

looqog 


$18 00 


1 44 
20 15 

4 00 

5 00 




138 32 

1 ' 


o 
o 

CO 






o 
o 


• 00 O O O 00 

• i> o as o 

• r-H O CO co oq 


2 02 
14 54 


251 63 


q,qos uiojj d^g 


: 


• • ©l ©3 




• CO 

• <M 














CO CO • • • 


: : 


CO 
lO 




o 

co 


O? OiO 
tH - ©> CO 




• OS 
• 












O iO iO o o o o 
c-q as co o io co co 
oq 


CO CO 


J> 
oo 

OS 


•n,doid85jwf\[ 




CO • CQ IN 


Ol CM 


CM 






00 <M <M w • o; 


CO CM 


: 


•ud^vjj siadtfj 

PUB S8l[I^JBll^) 


iO 


CO • o o 

r-l • ^ lO 


©* co 

• OS O 


8 








C O O O O O 00 
^ CO © OS GO CO 


OS 


!l722 


S8ranjoA ©NT 




• • o • »a 

• -GO • i>- 
















• o ■ o 

• 00 -to 






00 

oq 


•S[ooqag -o^j 








r- < c 
















-H rH 


s 




CO 

co 


OS -f 00 t> 
h N iM iO 




OS 

OS 




o 
o 






»© th co go as co to 

CO rH 


00 GO 

CO to 


1518 


"SlTqOqOg O]^ 


o 

CO 


CO i> iO O 

T-H — lO 




oq 

OS 




o 

OS 






C-OOOOOIO— < 

CO 1-H 


CO Oi 
CO iO 


1370 


•sjaqo^ox 
para si90cgo 


CO' 


CO £— CO c— 




C- o 

CO 


© 






^tHCOCOOlC-OSt-CO 

r— 1 *-H 


to co 


00 



CD 
S- 

o 

CO S 
go ED 



go g 



O 

■85 

O x 

fe: CO 

a J 

2 co 



HE 



H 

— of 

-fa 



s 

o 

CD X3 

Ss 



S3 o 
h— 5 CO 

* co 



O ■ 



- ® "CO 

33 t3 GO W) ° .'fl'Ofe 

fcJ)^ M o O ^£ 

oj C n >0 S-, O O "~» 



r tD < r O 

QJ CD CD CD CD 

~ a ' 
a 



u CO-, 

CD 



CD 

'z aw aaacoP^ 

CD ^ CD CD CD *-i 

• Fh . tH S- U CD r • . 

- . , - = cooE • 



o p 



ft 
fa 

ft 

fa 

• / a 

~ s W) - 

8 ^ g i 



Q 



^3 - ■ 

CD . . 

CD 03 

!h . 03 

O • g 

2o 

2 CD 

— ^ 00 CD 



O CD Q 53 



o 



&0 

. a 
co . 



S oo 

a a 



— CD 

CD € O' 
^ CD . 



O 



a 

CD 



O 3 



CD 
CO 

a> ° 

go "S 3^ ft'C ^^j^^^ao-^ 

g » 5 .2 * « +j © * &.2 .5 cd .2 

t-5 t-s 



-S 57 curt;.— 83 CD s3 Li" S — CD.iS 



o 
s-i ; 

O' 

■II 
II 

co co 



CD 

> • 
Or 



GO 



GO 



CSC--H© .iOI^QOCOCOCO^OQOOS • 'rH <N 
lO ^ c£> • M(Mtli>ONCOO-* • C? lO 

HNHrt . t-H 1— I ^ i— li— I 






i 


• LO 


CO 


CO 


c 


• 


© 


o 




© 


■ • © 


Ol © OS 


1 


X 


X 


X) 


GO 


CN 


CO 


© 




CO 




tO 


CO 


Oi ■ 






TH 


OS 


• • GO CO O C- 


OS 


00 


© 


00 




CN 


© 




•s[^ox 


lO 


• CO 


C! 


© 


c 




X 


OS 


co 


, 


• • c 


co © — ' 


CO 


i> 


os 


© 


X 


OS 


CO 


CO 


o 


; CM 




X 


OS • 


iO 




Oi 


Oi 


• CM 


I - t 


- CO 




o 


x 




i> 




Oi 


to 




Oi 










cn 


Oi 








CN 




Oi 


CO 










CN 






¥=► 








































to 




O 


• iO 


Ol 


o 




• 




o 






• © © 


© >o © 


o 


© 


X 


© 


tO 


© 


© 






CO 






c 






© 


o 


r- 


CO 


• CN CO IO Ol © 


o 


c 


03 


o 


1>- 


to 


o 


LO 


•panj o^nuip\[ 


CM 








03 • 


CO 


CO 










Ol 




CN 


CN 










X 










































Oi 











©~ 




> • 


o 


c; 


CO 


o 






tO 


— 


o 












X 


•sioaLqo 








o 












© 






' to 


to 


© 








© 




© 








© 


00 • 


© 


© 


>o 


03 






• GO 


o> 


to 








© 






.181140 








CM 


03 




CO 












to 


o 








CM 




oo 
© 









© 


© 






CO 


© 


— 


o 




© 


— tF 


o 


w 


o 


o 


© 


© 


{> 




•panj pipu 


to 




o 


© 


tO 




03 


© 


to 


Cxi 


• • © 


© 


• 03 


© 


o 


© 


© 


to 


© 




X 


Q r^il vT T 1 I TAT 
t BU.r»4SlU I. J/\L 


CO 




CO 




CO 




CN 


tO 


— 






03 


• © 


CO 


to 


CO 


03 






Oi 


1- 

Th 





© 


• O 


__ 


© 




o 


o 




o 




© 




o 


© 


© 


to 


o 


© 






•uopBonpg; 


o 


: 10 


© 


Oi 


8 


© 


© 








© 


• iO 


© 


© 


© 


i> 


to 


to 


CO 


© 


rm laiain ttat 


lO 




03 






00 


lO 


CO 


oq 




co 


• ^ 


to 


© 


CO 


oi 








OS 

© 




























— 






-rrl 








c- 




'S[()0H0g 
















o 










• © 






© 














' 














© 










• to 

• CO 




■ 


03 










to 
c- 








CO 




- — 




o 






lo~ 


lO Ol 


• os 






O 












■ajaBa'eTjd.io 




• o 


Oi 


© 


c 




• © 


© 


to 


CM 


• • 04 


© 


• In. 


© 


GO 


Oi 


© 


to 


© 


to 


© 


O 




i> 


IO 






• o 


o 


© 


to 


• • oo 


OS 


: to 


to 




© 


X 


Tt< 




00 


Ol 




Ol 








oi 


• Ol 










CO 


■ Oi 




cn 


— < 




























































o 


© 




c 






© 


© 


© 


,— - 








© 


© 


. 

© 


© 


Ol 


to 


© 


saoissiftf 




• to 


o 


© 


~t 




■ © 


to 


© 


© 


: : c 


© 


• to 


8 


© 


to 


© 


to 


© 




to 




o 




to 


CO 


CO 




• x 


TW 
© 




00 




© 


• TP 

• to 


© 


© 

CO 


© 

CN 


oo 


CO 




© 


to 

OS 












































Oi 




o 


■ © 


o 


o 






CO 


© 


© 


© 


- ■ © 


o 


. -fi 


tx, 


© 


© 


T* 


CO 


© 


IO 


© 


•suoissii\[ 

8Lll0f[ 


o 




IO 


c? 






• oi 




© 


x 


■ • © 


© 


• !>• 


oa 


© 




tH 






CO 


to 


IO 




CO 


Ol 






: tO 


OS 

©3 


to 






to 


• CN 

• CO 


© 


GO 


»o 


CO 


CN 




X 


© 



;uoisaij\[ 



• © X tP x 



© © to to 
lO © £- £>• 
— i X 



. . ,0) 

s = > 

o 



a 

g S 



.2 a 3 

111 

S p 23 



. . 0) 

■ 03 ~ 

™ *> 

-C > °5 
as c3 

> S o 

oo C _3 

03 a 3 

|f I 

a * ^r 1 
o o a) m-i 

C . a) 



I til I 

c'S q S a 



= r-. o 



Fh h - 

bo w fee 
a u sJ ^ fl 

1-3 ^ l-J 
Sfci 



: E 

oO 



feci? 



-5 2 



5 -g § S 2 o 3 2 g g ^ « os - s « 53 IS ^ 2 S S 



O cu 



fl iS 

§3* 



co o3 
13 © 

P- a 



• > 

• o 

a 

o o 
«co 



CDs 



5^ S 



MINUTES 



Seventy-Second Annual Session 

( Seventy-Third Anniversary ) 



Liberty Baptist Association,' 



HELD WITH 



New Friendship Church, 



August 22d, 23rd and 24th, 1905. 



GO-LDSBORO : 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1905. 



MINUTES 

OP THE 



Seventy-Second Annual Session 



OF 

Liberty Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

New Friendship Church, 
August 22d, 23rd and 24th, 1905. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

Moderator: James Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk: Henry Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer: S. H. Averitt, Thomasville, N. C. 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER OF INTRODUCTORY SERMON 
FOR THE SESSION 1906. 

The session for next year will be held *with the church at Thomas- 
ville, N. C, on Tuesday after the third Sunday in August, 1906. 
Elder W. A. Smith to preach the sermon; Elder P. H. Jones, alter- 
nate. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION, 
AUGUST, 1904. 



Adderton, W. S , . Denton, N. C. 

Boone, J. B Thomasville, N. C. 

Harrill, George P Thomasville, N. C, 

banning, Jeff Denton, N. C. 

Leach, M. J Lassiter, N. C. 

Miller, John R .Thomasville, N. C. 

Morton, H Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D Thomasville, N. C. 

Sheets, Henry Lexington, N. C. 

Smith, W. A Lexington, N. C. 

Stoker, Ambrose P Denton, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

R. S. GREEN, Jr. JAMES SMITH. 

WILLIAM BOWERS. W. C. ROACH. 

C. M. WALL. 



Proceedings. 



New Friendship Baptist Church, 

August 22, 1905. 
Liberty Baptist Association convened with this church to- 
day in its seventy-second annual session. The introductory 
sermon was delivered by Elder John R. Miller, from John 
21.22. 

Intermission for Dinner. 

On reassembling the Moderator called the body to order. 
Elder H. A. Brown, D. D. ? read the Scripture and led in 
prayer. 

Elder John R. Miller and Archibald Johnson were ap- 
pointed as reading clerks. 

The roll of churches was then called and names of mes- 
sengers enrolled as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — N. R. Teague and C. H. Teague. 
Aslieboro — Not represented. 
Center Cross — Not represented. 
Denton — Arthur Lanning and W. B. Thompson. 
Gravel Hill— William D. Loftin and B. I. Sheets. 
Holloway's — J. S. Fine and Berry R. Cross. 
Huldah — Not represented. 
Jackson's Creek — By letter. 

Jersey — Z. T. Sharp, Roba Snider and Ira Sharp. 

Lexington — E. M. Ward and W. W. Yarborough. 

Liberty — H. P. May and J. M. Easter. 

Lick Creek — P. M. Snider and W. A. Stoker. 

Maple Springs — Not reported. 

Mount Lebanon — M. J. Leach. 

New Friendship — H. F. Motsinger, Geleva Hartman and Branson 
F. Charles. 
Oak Hill — Not represented. 
Orphanage — S. H. Averitt. 
Pine Meeting House — O. T. Davis. 
Piney Grove — C. M. Wall and J. Ezra Motsinger. 
Reed's X Roads — D. C. Craver, J. N. Myers and Benjamin Myers, 
Rich Fork — Mills Newton and Thomas H. Small. 
Stoner's Grove — J. H. Wafford, D. D. Davis and Everett Wafford. 
Summerville — By letter. 
Taylor's Grove — Not represented. 

Thomasville — Archibald Johnson and John R. Miller. 

Visiting brethren were then invited to seats. Elder Liv- 
ingston Johnson, Corresponding Secretary of Baptist State 



4 



Convention; Elder J. S. Farmer, representing the Biblical 
Recorder ; Elder S. F. Conrad, in the interest of the North 
Carolina Baptist; Elder H. A. Brown, of the Pilot Moun- 
tain; Elder S. B. Wilson, of the Beulah, and MacCauley 
Costlier, of the Raleigh Association, accepted seats in the 
body. Mr. Benjamin W. Parham, principal-elect of Liberty 
Associational High School, was introduced and responded 
with a few appropriate remarks. 

The association then proceeded to election of officers for 
the ensuing year, which resulted in re-election of James 
Smith, Moderator; Henry Sheets, Clerk, and S. H. Averitt, 
Treasurer. 

The Moderator appointed George P. Harrill, W. A. 
Smith and D. C. Graver as a Committee on Grcler of Busi- 
ness. 

Elder G. P. Harrill read the 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Children in our homes and in our schools are taught to have a 
definite aim in life, and some definite end to accomplish in every 
undertaking. Sometime we who have been diligent in teaching 
these lessons forget them ourselves when we undertake. So, in 
order to practice what we teach, let us ask: What end is to be ac- 
complished in a report on State Missions to an association? We 
answer, in short, to help forward the work of State Missions in 
the association. Now, let us notice a few things that may stimulate 
us in the work: 

We, as Baptists, should never be satisfied until every home in 
North Carolina is in reasonable reach of a Baptist Church, and 
regular preaching at the church at least once every month. We 
cannot make men believe the Gospel, but we can give them the 
opportunity; and until this opportunity has been provided for every 
community in the State our full duty to the work of State Mis- 
sions has not been done. 

Last year there were 124 missionaries employed by the board for 
all or a part of their time; and by these missionaries more than 
1,000 persons were baptized, making an average of 10 baptisms for 
each missionary at work. When we remember that the mission- 
aries are at work in fields that are largely anti-Baptist, and that 
the average number of baptisms by these workers is almost equal 
to the average number of baptisms by the pastors who are at work 
in fields where conditions are not so difficult, we feel encouraged 
to press the question of State Missions. Taking into consideration 
the fact that some state mission work is already being done in the 
Liberty Association, we could find fields for 200 state missionaries 
next year in North Carolina, and then the average opportunities 
for hearing the Gospel would not be equal to that in our own Asso- 
ciation. 

Last year there were 29 new churches organized within the 



5 



State, and 16 of these were organized by State missionaries. The 
state misionary receives a little less than $145 a year from the 
State Mission Board. Would it not be a good investment for the 
Liberty Association to put $145 more into State Missions and re- 
ceive in return 10 baptized annually, and one new church organ- 
ized every 18 months? 

Let us ever remember this, that as fast as we organize new 
churches and then cultivate them till they become self-supporting 
we add to the strength we already have for the furthering of the 
Gospel in other destitute fields. GEORGE P. HARRILL. 

This able, interesting report was spoken to by Secretary 
Livingston Johnson, nsing his large missionary map of North 
Carolina, showing the destitution in the State. After pledges 
had been taken, the report was adopted. 

W. A. Smith, C. M. Wall and P. M. Snider were ap- 
pointed a committee on Place and Preacher. This com- 
mittee after retirement, made only a partial report, recom- 
mending Thomasville as the place. This was amended by 
recommending W. A. Smith as the preacher and F. H. Jones 
as alternate. The report as amended, was adopted. 

The pastor and delegates of this church were appointed a 
committee on religious exercises. 

The committee appointed on order of business, made only 
a partial report, as follows: 

FOR THURSDAY FORENOON. 

Religious exercises to commence at 9:30, spending half an hour. 
Sunday Schools — 10 to 10:45. 
Foreign Missions — 10:45 to 11:45. 
Periodicals — 11:45 to 12:15. 
Intermission — 12:15 to 1:30. 

The Association feeling a deep interest in all the churches, 
and five of them not reporting regularly, viz. : Asheboro, 
Huldah, Maple Springs, Oak Hill and Marion, therefore a 
committee of five, consisting of John K. Miller, M. J. Leach, 
Jeff Lanning, W. A. Smith and Archibald Johnson, was 
appointed to look after these churches and report their con- 
dition, with recommendation, at our next session. 

Tt was appointed that Elder S. F. Conrad preach in this 
house to-night. 

Adjourned. Benediction by Elder J. D. Newton. 



6 



WEDNESDAY MORNING. 

August 23rd. 

Promptly on time (9:30) Elder G.'P. Harrill conducted 
religious exercises. 

At 10 o'clock the Moderator called the body to order. 

Appointed the following brethren as a committee on 
Finance : B. I. Sheets and B. P. Cross. 

On motion of Archibald Johnson the committee on Order 
of Business was instructed to provide a place on the pro- 
gramme for Woman's Work. Adopted. 

Bro. W. C. Barnes read the following: 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Recognizing the importance of the Sunday School work as a fac- 
tor in the development of the churches, we believe that we need to 
work more to develop the young church members and work for a 
more thorough organization of our schools. W. C. BARNES. 

Addresses on the above report were made by W. 0. 
Barnes, Archibald Johnson and F. H. Jones. The report 
was then adopted. 

At this juncture, the Moderator gave an opportunity to 
visitors to report: Prof. F. P. Hobgood, of Oxford 
Seminary for Girls, and Elder J. F. Lancaster, of Pilot 
Mountain Association reported, and were invited to seats 
in the body. 

Pastor W. A. Smith read the 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The last conventional year was the most successful one in the 
history of modern missions, from every point of view. God has 
most signally crowned the efforts of his people and has smiled upon 
every advance movement along the line of missions. 

It would be interesting to record the progress of missionary effort 
by the various religious bodies, but we must confine ourselves in 
this brief report to this work as carried on by our own Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

We now have missions in China, Japan, Africa, Italy, Mexico, 
Brazil and Argentine. By contrasting a few statistics for the past 
ten years we can easily see somewhat of the success that has at- 
tended our efforts. In 1895 we had 91 missionaries; we now have 
181. In 1895 we had 85 churches; we now have 194. In 1895 there 
were 1,503 in Sunday School; now we have 5,496. In 1895 we had 
581 baptisms; during the past year we had 2,241. In 1895 we gave 
$135,435.02; last year we gave $283,415.88. 



7 



During the past year we have sent out 50 new missionaries, al- 
most twice as many as we ever sent out in any one previous year. 

The salary of a missionary ranges from $500 to $600, according to 
location. 

The total expenses for conducting our mission work is less than 
10 per cent. This includes salaries of all secretaries, office ex- 
penses, etc. 

In view of the need of a well trained native ministry, there has 
been established on the foreign field seven theological training 
schools, which have had in attendance during the past year over a 
hundred men. We also have printing houses on the foreign field, 
which are scattering the Word of God among the people in their 
native tongue, besides giving them much other helpful Christian 
literature. We also have ten medical missionaries, who, while 
treating the bodily ills in our hospitals, have opportunity to intro- 
duce their patients to the Great Physician of the soul. 

Our Woman's Missionary Union is doing a great work. The re- 
port for last year showed $53,678.45 raised. They undertake to 
raise this year $63,500. May success attend their noble effort. 

By a little examination of our minutes for last year you will find 
that our association gave less than 8 cents per member for For- 
eign Missions. It seems from such a statement as this that the 
great commission of our Master, "Go ye into all the world and 
preach the Gospel to every creature," had made but little impres- 
sion upon our people. 

Remembering the commission of our Master, and the success 
which has attended our efforts hitherto, your committee recom- 
mends that our churches of this association increase their contri-* 
butions at least 10 per cent, for this great cause for ensuing 
year. Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. SMITH, Committee. 

Bro. Smith addressed the Association on the above able 
report, followed by S. F. Conrad. Pledges were then taken, 
after which the report was adopted. 

Bro. S. A. Hege came forward and read the 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The importance of reading good literature can hardly be esti- 
mated. Our people become well informed and efficient in the 
Lord's work in proportion as they read wisely and prudently. As a 
denomination claiming what we do we can afford least of all people 
to not be informed. The Bible and Baptist literature are our main 
source of information. The Biblical Recorder, being the acknowl- 
edged organ of our denomination, appeals most strongly to each 
and every Baptist home in the State. It is true to Bible doctrine 
and has stood in the front of every aggressive movement for the 
right of our people and the uplifting of our denomination. 

The North Carolina Baptist, known to all our people, is a live, 
wideawake paper. It, too, stands for all our denominational inter- 
ests. For many years it has been outspoken on the temperance 
question. Its coming into our homes will prove a blessing to our 
people, 



8 



Charity and Children fills its own place. No other paper could do 
its work. We need it. Take it and read it. 

The Foreign Mission Journal and Home Field are organs of our 
denomination, and should be taken and read by all Baptist. In no 
other way can they be so well informed as to our mission work. 

S. A. HEGB, 
JOHN SUMMY, 

Committee. 

Bro. J. S. Farmer spoke for the Biblical Recorder. S. E. 
Conrad represented the North. Carolina Baptist. Bro. Archi- 
bald Johnson spoke with spirit on the work done by Charity 
and .Children. 

After an interesting discussion on the report, it was 
adopted. 

The committee on Order of Business submitted the follow- 
ing, completing their report: 

WEDNESDAY— AFTERNOON. 

Woman's Mission Work — 1:45 to 2:00. 
Orphanage— 2 : 00 to 2:45. 
Home Missions — 2:45 to 3:30. 

Education and Associational High School — 3:30 to 4:00. 

THURSDAY—FORENOON. 

Devotional Exercises — 9:30 to 10:00. 
Ministers' Relief— 10:00 to 10:45. 
Temperance — 10:45 to 11:15. 
Obituaries— 11:15 to 11:30. 
Miscellaneous— 11:30 to 12:00. 

After the adoption of the above, the Association adjourned 
for dinner. Benediction by Elder J. F. Lancaster. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING. 

August 23th 

The Asociation was called to order. The chair appointed 
the following committee, consisting of G. P. Harrill, P. M. 
Snider and Z. T. Sharp, to name the Executive Board. 

There was no written report of Woman's Work, but Bro. 
Archibald Johnson made a strong speech in favor of the 
organization of AVoman's Missionary Societies in each church 
in our Association. We hope this suggestion will be heeded. 



9 



ORPHANAGE REPORT. 

The year has been a very eventful one at the Orphanage. A 
typhoid fever scourge raged through some three or four months 
last fall, and more than 80 of the children were victims of this 
dreadful disease. By the mercy of the Lord only two died. 

A fire last spring destroyed the barn with its contents, consist- 
ing of a large lot of feed for the stock. Five mules and a horse 
perished in the flames. 

In the month of July a hail storm destroyed much of the finest 
crop we have ever had. 

Notwithstanding these things the Orphanage is in good condi- 
tion and will do the largest work of its history during the coming 
year. The capacity of the institution is being enlarged and the 
outlook is that we shall have before the year closes between three 
and four hundred children under its loving care. 

We urge our churches to rally to the Orphanage in its hour of 
real need. A debt hangs over the institution that ought to be paid 
this year. Let us do our part in this service of love. 

S. H. AVERITT. 

Speeches were made on the work of our Orphanage and 
its work, by Bro. S. H. Averitt and F. P. Hobgood. 

After pledges had been taken the report was adopted. 

The committee appointed to name the Executive Com- 
mittee submitted the following: 

We, the committee to name the Executive Committee of the As- 
sociation, recommend R. S. Green, Jr., James Smith, William 
Bowers, W. C. Roach and C. M. Wall. 

G. P. HARRILL, 

Z. T. SHARP, 

P. M. SNIDER. 

This report was adopted. 
Elder John K. Miller read the 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Our Home Mission Board made a splendid report at our Conven- 
tion in Kansas City last May. Notwithstanding there had been 
some criticism during the year, the Convention heartily supported 
the Board, and ordered it to enlarge its work for this year. 

Your committee considers the Home Mission work as important 
as any work we have before our Convention. For, unless we take 
care of our home-land and keep the ranks recruited and the 
churches developed, we will not be able to conquer the world for 
Christ. 

The Home Board's Field. 

The Home Board is doing work in fourteen of our Southern 
States, two territories, Cuba, the Isle of Pines and Pa nam . The 
work done by the Home Board in the different States is chiefly 
supplementary to the work of State Mission Boards. T'i. several 



10 



of our Southern States the Baptists are totally unable to supply 
the destitution within their borders. Here the Home Board comes 
to their aid and finds one of its most important and needly fields. 
In the territories and frontier section of the Great Southwest the 
work done by the Home Mission Board is our only hope and de- 
pendence. In this great and fertile section of our Southland, where 
cities and towns are being built, as it were, in a day; and into 
which a great tide of immigration is flowing, our Home mission- 
aries are trying to sow the seed of the Gospel of Christ. What 
the harvest will be only the future can tell, but, judging by past 
and present indications, it will be a glorious harvest. 

In Cuba the work is moving along very well, and it behooves 
us as Baptists to give this new Republic the Gospel of Christ, that 
Cuba, the Pearl of the Antilles, may be given to our Lord and 
Master. 

Panama. 

Our Home Board, ever wideawake to the interests of the Mas- 
ter's Kingdom, has placed a missionary, Rev. J. L. Wise, at Pana- 
ma. He is the first missionary on the field, and in the July number 
of The Home Field he gives us an account of the field and the 
work to be done. What are the opportunities and possibilities of 
this great Canal Zone is yet to be determined, but we know that 
Panama will soon become a great world center, as it were — the 
gateway of the nations. Then how needful that we set up the 
standard of Christ there at the very beginning of this great en- 
terprise. -'^ 
As we see, therefore, that the demands on the Home Board are 
increasing, let us increase our contributions accordingly. 

JOHN R. MILLER, 
ROBERT S. GREEN, Jr., 

Committee. 

This report was discussed by John R. Miller, G. P. Mar- 
rill and W. A. Smith. 

Pledges were made for this object and then the report was 
adopted. 

The following was read : 

REPORT ON EDUCATION AND LIBERTY ASSOCIATION AL 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

The Bible says: "Train up a child in the way it should go." If 
we wish it to go right we must train it right. And we cannot pos- 
sibly do this without educating it morally, intellectually and spirit- 1 
ually, and this will not be done without an effort on the part of the, 
parents at home and the teachers at school. 

Well, we are glad that our State is doing more for the education 
of her children now than it did some years ago, which should not 
be despised by us as parents, but should receive our encourage- 
ment. 

We are proud of our Associational School at Wallburg, and can 
recommend it to the patrons of our Association. We are also glad 
that we have other high schools in our bounds which are doing 



11 



good work. May the Lord bless all of these schools and may 
many of our children be prepared through them sooner or later for 
college. 

And we should not forget our own colleges — Wake Forest, for 
boys and young men, which has been doing good work for two- 
thirds of a century; with Murfreesboro, Oxford and the University 
at Raleigh for girls and young women. 

We should not be unmindful of the fact that the Lord is contin- 
ually calling poor young men to the ministry, who are not able 
within themselves to educate and prepare for the duties of a min- 
ister of the Gospel. May we all lend a helping hand to this God 
blessed work. WILLIAM BOWERS. 

Prof. P. P. Hobgood spoke, commending the teachers of 
the Liberty Association High School. He was followed by 
Mr. Benjamin W. Parham in an able address on the respon- 
sibility of parents educating their children. Archibald 
Johnson spoke encouragingly. 

On motion of G. P. Harrill, the pastors and delegates 
were kindly asked to lay the matter of a deficit, due the 
teachers, before the churches and give any who might 
wish to do so, an opportunity to aid in the matter, as an Asso- 
ciational School — also stating as a matter of interest to each 
church, that the Trustees had generously offered a scholar- 
ship to one in each church. 

The Moderator appointed a committee consisting of John 
R. Miller and Jeff Panning to nominate the Associat ional 
Trustees of our High School. 

Treasurer Averitt submitted his report which is found 
below : 1 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 
Receipts. 

State Missions — From Finance Committee and Churches.. $ 79.07 
Home Missions — From Finance Committee and Churches . . 76.29 
Foreign Missions — From Finance Committee and Churches. 122.78 
Ministerial Relief — From Finance Committee and Churches. 26.51 
Ministerial Education — From Finance Committee and 

Churches 34.02 

Minute Fund — From Finance Committee and Churches 31.42 

Sunday School Missions — From Churches 7.40 



Total Receipts 



$377.49 



12 



Disbursements. 

State Missions — Paid to Watters Durham, Treasurer $ 79.07 

Home Missions — Paid to Watters Durham, Treasurer 76.29 

Foreign Missions — Paid to Watters Durham, Treasurer 122.78 

Ministerial Relief — Paid to Watters Durham, Treasurer.... 26.51 
Ministerial Education — Paid to Watters Durham, Treasurer 34.02 

Minute Fund — Paid to Rev. Henry Sheets, Clerk 31.42 

Sunday School Missions — Paid to Watters Durham, Treas... 7.40 



Total Disbursements $377.49 

Respectfully, 
S. H. AVBRITT, Treasurer. 

The following named brethren were appointed to write a 
report for next session of this association, on the subjects to 
which their names are attached. 

On State Missions — Archibald Johnson, William Bowers. 

On Home Missions — Benjamin W. Parham, C. M. Wall. 

On Foreign Missions — F. H. Jones, S. A. Hege. 

On Periodicals — N. R. Teague, Thomas Carrick. 

On Education — W. A. Smith, W. W. Yarborough. 

On Orphanage — G. P. Harrill, T. H. Small. 

On Sunday Schools — P. M. Snider, J. W. Cole. 

On Ministers' Relief — Jeff Lanning, W. T. Tysinger. 

On Temperance — S. H. Averitt, J. T. Valentine. 

On Obituaries — John R. Miller, A. R. Craver. 

On Woman's Work — Archibald Johnson, H. Morton, J. D. Newton. 

After some announcements, a motion to adjourn prevailed. 
Benediction by J. S. Farmer. 



THURSDAY MORNING. 

August 24th. 
Elder H. Morton conducted religious exercises. 
The body was called to order. 
Elder Lanning read the 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RELIEF. 

It is not only a duty that we owe unto the Lord, but a privilege 
to care for the old, wornout ministers of North Carolina. 

We heartily commend this work to all of the churches of the 
Liberty Association. JEFF. LANNING. 

This report was discussed by Elders Jeff Lanning, John 
R. Miller and G. P. Harrill. ' As to pledges, the clerk was 



13 



instructed to place the amounts pledged last year, to the 
churches this year. 

The report was then adopted. 

The committee to nominate the Trustees of the Liberty 
Associational High School, made the following 

REPORT. 

We, your committee to nominate Trustees for our Associational 
School, recommend the following brethren, viz.: W. A. Smith, Z. T. 
Sharpe, A. Johnson and P. M. Snider. 

J. R. MILLER, 
JEFF LANNING, 

Committee. 

The report adopted. 

Elder John R. Miller offered the following, for the con- 
sideration of the churches till next session of this body : 

This is to serve notice that at the next session of this Association 
a motion will be made to change the time of meeting to Tuesday 
before the third Sunday in November. 

Elder Harrill offered the following, which was adopted : 

Moved that the pastors of the Association be requested to take 
collections in their churches for the aid of indigent young minis- 
ters in our Seminary at Louisville. 

The body proceeded to elect delegates to Baptist State 
Convention, which resulted in the selection of the following 
named brethren: C. M. Wall, John R. Miller and Jeff 
Lanning. 

Elder M. L. Kestler was appointed a delegate to the South- 
ern Baptist Convention; Elder W. A. Smith was his alter- 
nate. 

Bro. C. M. Wall made a motion to elect Bro. W. A. 
Smith as our Associational representative on the State Board, 
and his expenses be paid out of the State Mission funds. 

Bro. J. O. Bowers read the 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Since the Convention at Winston, in 1901, when a standing com- 
mittee on Temperance was appointed and which resulted in the 
formation of the Anti-Saloon League of the State, the temperance 



14 



question has assumed a decidedly definite shape, and much pro- 
gress has been made, as the following figures will show: 

Saloons, December 1, 1901, in the State, 400. 

Saloons, December 1, 1904, in the State,, 150. 

Counties with saloons, December 1, 1901, 40. 

Counties with saloons, December 1, 1904, 26. 

Distilleries, December 1, 1901, 400. 

Distilleries, December 1, 1904, 78. 

We believe in total prohibition as the final solution of the whisky 
question in our State, and urge our people to work for a speedy ac- 
complishment of this aim. The moral forces are more united than 
ever before and they seem determined to fight this battle until the 
victory is won. 

May we not hope that the day will come when liquor will not be 
manufactured in our State and when it will be a misdemeanor for 
a person to get drunk. Drunkenness is a crime, and the pity is that 
our laws do not embrace it as a criminal offense. 

We recognize the great value of our recently enacted laws on 
temperance, but these were only designed to meet the demands 
partially of the clamoring multitudes of earnest workers in the 
temperance cause. Righteousness and peace must eventually reign 
and spread their pinions over the chasm of human woe and bind 
up the broken hearts and set at liberty the captives of strong 
drink. J. D. NEWTON. 

J. O. BOWERS. 

The report was discussed by G. P. Harrill. Adopted. 

The brethren appointed last year on Obituaries, were not 
present and as no written report was offered, the names of 
several aged members of our churches were given and their 
names are recorded here, viz. :* 

Mrs. C. G. Strayhorn, Mrs. Julia E. Moore, Branson Bee- 
son, Miss Elizabeth Eulp, Mrs. Matilda Swaim, W. P. Red- 
wine, Mrs. Margaret Redwine, Miss Mariah Redwine, Mrs. 
M. K. Clinard and Enoch Briggs. 

Bro. J. T. Valentine offered the following: 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Association be tendered the 
brethren, sisters and friends of this Church for their kind and gen- 
erous hospitality. Respectfully submitted. 

This resolution of thanks received a hearty vote, for the 
hospitality was all that could be desired. 

On the publication of our Associational History, the fol- 
lowing brethren were named as the committee : W. A. 
Smith, Geo. P. Harrill, John R. Miller and C. M. Wall. 

On motion of Elder E. H. Jones, the Clerk was allowed 



15 



$10 for his services, writing, superintending the printing 
and distribution of the minutes. 

The work of the Asociation was concluded. Pastor Jones 
made tender and appreciative remarks in regard to the body 
having met with this (his) church. Elder W. A. Smith 
responded in terms of highest appreciation of the efforts put 
forth to make all comfortable and happy. 

Pastor Harrill, of Thomasville church, then extended a 
hearty invitation to all to come to Thomasville next year. 

Thus ended the Seventy- Second Session of the Liberty 
Association. 



Heney Sheets, Clerk. 



The report of the Finance Committee was borrowed from 
the committee and never came into the hands of the Clerk. 
This accounts for its not being in the minutes. 



JAMES SMITH, Moderator, 



STATEMENT MINUTE FUND. 



From last year 

Received from Finance Committee 



.93 
27.98 



Total in hand 



$ 28.91 
CLERK. 



16 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES AND SUNBEAMS. 

There are only two of these societies in the Liberty Association, 
but they have given a fine ilustration of what earnest, consecrated 
Christian women can do, when properly organized for this work. 
May others catch their spirit. 

Woman's Missionary Society — Thomasville Church. 



Church repairs, etc $ 59.52 

Home Missions 70.51 

State Missions 16.10 

Foreign Missions 15.10 

For expense fund for Central Committee 1.00 



Total - ' $162.23 

Number of members, 29. 



MRS. G. P. HARRILL, President. 
SUNBEAMS. 



Contributions — 

Foreign Missions $ 2.65 

Home Missions 2.60 



Total $ 5.25 



Number of members, 12. 

MISS KATE JOHNSON, President. 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY— LEXINGTON CHURCH. 

Contributions from September, 1904, to August, 1905 — 



Home Missions $ 8.00 

Foreign Missions 11.25 

State Missions 11.80 

Christmas Offering 1.55 

Yates' Memorial College .45 

Baptist Orphanage 18.00 

On hand, not appropriated 47.50 



Total collected $98.55 

Number of members, 34. 



MISS ROXIE SHEETS, President. 
Mrs. J. K. HANKTNS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

SUNBEAMS. 

Contributions to the various objects (about), $10.00. 
Number of members, 25. 

MISS SEARLES OWEN, President. 



17 



TABLE OF PLEDGES FOR 1905-1906. 



— ... . — 

CHURCHES 


1 1 
i 

State Missions. 


Home Missions, jj 


Foreign Missions 


Orphanage. 


Ministerial 

Education, j 


Ministerial 
Relief. 


Total. 


Asheboro 


15 00 


5 00 


12 00 


22 50 


5 00 


4 00 


63 50 
















Denton 

Gravel Hill 

Huldah 


6 00 
5 00 
16 00 


3 50 
3 00 
6 00 


6 00 

7 50 
15 00 


14 00 
8 00 
20 00 


2 00 
1 50 
5 00 


3 50 
1 50 
3 50 


35 00 
26 50 
65 50 




22 00 

^n on 
ou uu 

4 00 

7 00 


1 on 

7 00 
9^ nn 

5 00 

6 00 


c, OU 

20 00 

7^ nn 
/ o uu 

12 00 

10 00 


o nn 
z uu 

20 00 

7^ nn 
/o uu 

12 50 

15 00 


1 nn 
1 uu 

8 00 

i f\ nn 
LO uu 

3 00 

3 00 


i nn 

1 uu 

2 50 

k nn 

uu 

2 00 

1 50 


7 50 
79 50 
9£*\ nn 

L<±>J UU 

38 50 
42 50 


















Mount Lebanon 

New Friendship 

Oak Hill 


2 50 
11 00 


1 00 

6 00 
1 00 

30 00 

7 00 
18 00 

6 00 
4 00 
3 00 


3 00 
12 00 


2 50 
35 00 

50 00 
20 00 
25 00 
20 00 
8 00 
5 00 


1 00 

3 00 

"26 66 

5 00 

6 50 
3 00 
3 00 
1 50 


1 00 

1 50 

5 00 
3 00 
5 00 
3 00 

2 00 
75 


11 00 
68 50 
1 00 

195 00 
62 00 

124 50 
62 00 
35 00 
18 25 


Orphanage 

Pine Meeting House. . 

Reed's Cross Roads. . 
Rich Fork 


50 00 
15 00 
35 00 
10 00 
9 50 
4 00 


40 00 
12 00 
35 00 
20 00 
9 00 
4 00 




3 00 
12 00 


1 00 
10 00 


2 00 
25 00 


2 00 
20 00 


50 
2 00 


1 00 
1 00 


9 50 
70 00 

1261 25 


Totals 


277 00 


148 50 


320 00 


376 50 


89 00 


47 75 



♦ 



aado 



•jCi^jqri m 



© tO OJ »0 lO 
CO CD O CO 
CO 



OlO o o o 

CO tO -C0 0!0 
i— I CO 



•s[Ooqog 'QJs[ 



•SJ9qo^9X 
pais sasogjo 



Ph 

ft 

<S 
co 

W 
Q 

P3 

Pu 

P 



■ £- £- iH 

. h CO CO 



o 

ao 

I? 



• ale 

• .£ 03 

• O !- • 



OD-2 



5 * 



O) tO tO <M 
CO OS CD 1C GO 

iO 



o t- tO to lO 

CO GO 93 
tO 



C P- a a a 
> J > ^ > 
'bQCP'tti ."So 

C c3 C 



CO — > 

t3 



;P5^3 



bfl 

a jg g ^ ^ 



^ a *> bd 
o o » . 



g^ 



lO O CO CO o to 
CO GO ^t 1 O CO CO 

CM 



lOOJOiCON 
CO ^t 1 (M OS CO CO 

CO '—I i-H 



HNHHHH 



NCOCON005 
^ <N GO O I> tO 
CO i—i -H 



O? lO CO t— CD CO 



a 

^ • a 
!> ~ g a 

CO « 03 
- fi 03 s_ 

C3 >» g 



c o 



>>'bC . ^ 
' fi Eh a 5 £3 s3 

' S C . 03 co ,S 



Q_! C3 



S2 a 03 a 



CO . 

s 



f rO -3 ^ M 



Q • C 

V3 £ 

O a, ^ > 

-° a a -3 

rs xn 33 ® - 



• ^ 

• 03 

• 03 

• fc- 

■.o 

CO 

j= "a 



o o> a 
a, o 

03 03 .2 

o c 1 - 4 g 



O t 3 ? 



c-^PP 



— 33 -i 

^ - i 

„ U 03 03 



c o 



03 



c c « 
^ a . 

so S|> 
c o . 



'. bD 
. a 



c "2 
a 



at 



C • ?3 

bX) a) 

B > CO 

S 03 "3 S 



3h <~ 



^ 3 3 h3 S S S O O Ph Pi 05 2i aQ 



£ c a 
3 s?-a 



* 



tl L t| O A. xJ L| LU o J/\[ 


CO t~ • O lO CM ■ 00 CM CO CD 

c- 1-h • cs co co 'OONWin 

r-H . T— 1 ■ HCQlH 


•ICNt'CCniOCOHt'COClrHr-l 

CO Ci CM :D >— i GO i> OS CO CM CO 
1—1 t— l CM th 


2232 


•sal's aio^ 


CO iO> • 00 CO O • CM <t~ CO OO 
rH t-( -tJICJ^i • CO Oi 'tf 1 Ol 


©NC4ON-<^C0«i>C0ai 
• • CM i> OS CO iC O CO CM CM t-i CO 
r— 1 i— ( 


1380 




ON • Oi CM CM • CO O O 00 
CO • t-i CO • CM i> CO lO 


•r-iOrfCOOOOO^'tOSOOW 
■ '<hiOhNNM«CO(M cm 


CO 




• • • iO • • • • lO CO ■ • • CO 


I- CM ■ ■ CO CO ■ • 


fr- 
ee 


'"TO 


lO • • • t-h 00 ■ CO CO CD - 


• OS OS OS 

: : : : : : 


CO 

co 



Lost. 






CO CO CO 


rH 00 CO O £"* 






CO 


N-*iO^OOrJ< -CO 
rH CM rH 


O 




CM 




rH ■ 








CM 




CM CO • CM C3 rt< 

; : : 


co 


•pgpnpxg; 






CM CM 




t-h CM T-H CM 










CM CM t-h rH CM — i ■ 


o 

CO 


passirasiQ 


"cm 




COrlW 




iO CO 00 rH 








i> © ■ 00 OS CQ rH -03 

r-H CM • 





P9A1909JJ 



rH TjH C3> CM 

CO U0 CQ CO~ 



CO •WIOOJOJ 



co 
?H 
o 

a 

« eg 

Oh > 



. 73 



- ?H 

CD 



CO r-TCO 

flam 

'=2 00 CO 



rH fH^g^ 

o o 



X! 



o s > v- 
o o 5}£ 

□ a £ i 
. p ,5*3 -^72 

O £ PH £ 3 £ 

o 



CO ^ > 

.1 00 02 
rQ * 



~ <0 O 

1 -EH 



+3 +3 r-? StO 

00 ij; 



M *H — >H . T, 

03 03 . . P *a 
££^CO££h 



03 

.2 a as _r 
r^j "oo > 

^ -2 o3 * 

^ ^ O S 
^ g ^COCO 

tfr-^H 



CD O! 

•Si s H 

Jh -3 

G.r> 

• 03 



O 

— ^ *h 

g 03 £S 

rg^q a 

^ 00 03 



S3 r-H 

O 03 

-2 > 

03 Sh 



S 03 .S ,2 £ ^ * ^ -2 .2 03 .2 



03 CO 



; Oh 

•' 3 

o ^ 

a a 

03 ' 



• 03 

. 05 

• 3 

• O 



t3 
03 

O 

.PfH 
• &0 03 

a > o3 
Are P P^i 



WW 



03 a 



03 
> 

oo m 

^ a 

03 ^ 



CO CO CO CO CO 
CO W N OJ 
ClOOrHH 



C5 CO 
rH O 
CO 



« 03 O « lO OJ CM 
N O CO i> C-» i> 
CO CO CM Tt* *-h 



CM I 00 
<tf <M 



•pang; a^naipf 



Cqo -iaqiO 



o • t- 

co • oo 

CM • 



pan^ pipy 



h CM lO CM 



O CO Iffl -H- CO 



aoi^'Bonpa 



•iooj 



•saoissi]^ 



saoissi]^ 

' 9III0H 



o o 

rn CC 



CO O O CO o o o 
(MOONHOTf 

O^QOCOOM 



*snoissij\[ 



•s^aspioai 



OOOiOlO 

oo 10 o t> j> 

rH Ci 



en 
O 

3° 

O 

Ph 



b0 

5 



(53 U 

°£ 

so P 
O 

£1 O 

His 



e bo ai 

O C oi 

a S 

o « 2 

.2 $ S 

o g-aoS 

S« 8* 



H Eh 



"> 3 - bo 

m &DC p 
g +j 

O * a 03 

i, O O J 



&0 cc 
a c3 

<u g 



03 



S 03 
Ch M 

03 . 

o . 



' -TrQ Q0 

=S 8 c « o 
§ 50 2 m a o tS 



PS . 

• !> 03 



f_ 03 03 
p ^ ^ i-i 

03 o O O 



r-i C HH ^ GO S 

U3 ~p^q 

O . 03 



. - bC bO c ~ 

03 ff ° I *C 

S g."| 2 S 

^ s . 

P^cfcJctJ £^ 

. 03 03 /"J 



w 

w 

o 

Ph 

£> 

W 

Q 



• 03 
. 03 

• o 



£3 o5 ;Q 

£ *>i - c 



05 



I S 

q p P 



CO 
□ 

03 D, 

Sod 



a »3 



. 3 



03 O 



C -~ O : 



O : o 

03 go 

«4 -9 o Q,o "S : W 3 . 3 ^ S S ^ o 6 S S S £ ®jF eh 



MINUTES 



Seventy-Third Annual Session 



(Seventy-Fourth Anniversary. ) 



Liberty Baptist Association, 



HELD WITH 



Thomasville Baptist Church, 



August 21st, 22d and 23rd, 1906. 



GOLDSBORO: 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1906. 



MINUTES 



Seventy-Third Annual Session 

(Seventy-Fourth Anniversary.) 



Liberty Baptist Association, 



HELD WITH 



Thomasville Baptist Church, 
August 21st, 22d and 23rd, 1906. 



OFFICERS OF THIS ASSOCIATION. 

Moderator: James Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk: Henry Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer: S. H. Averitt, Thomasville, N. C. 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER OF INTRODUCTORY SERMON 
FOR THE SESSION, AUGUST, 1907. 

The next session will be held with the church at Piney Grove on 
Tuesday after the third Sunday in August, 1907. Elder J. T. Riddick 
to preach the sermon; Elder S. D. Swaim, alternate. 



LIBERTY INSTITUTE, our associational school at Wallburg, N. C, 
under the able management of Prof. P. S. Vann, begins its 
fourth annual session August 27, 1906. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION, 
AUGUST, 1906. 



Adderton, W. S Denton, N. C. 

Harrill, George P Thomasville, N. C. 

Lanning, Jeff Denton,- N. C. 

Kesler, M. L Thomasville, N. C. 

Leach, M. J Lassiter, N. C. 

Morton, H Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D Thomasville, N. C. 

Riddick, J. T Lexington, N. C. 

Sheets, Henry Lexington, N. C. 

Stoker, Ambrose P Denton, N. C. 

Swaim, S. D Lexington, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

R. S. GREEN, JR., Chairman, Thomasville, N. C. 
JAMES SMITH, C. M. WALL, 

WILLIAM BOWERS, W. C. ROACH. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Thcmasyille Baptist Church. 

August 21, 1906. 
The messengers from the churches composing the Liberty 
Baptist Association convened with this church to-day, in its 
seventy-third annual session. In the absence of both ap- 
pointees, Elder J. S. Farmer preached the opening sermon 
from I John iv. 17 : "Because as he is. so are we in this 
world." 

INTERMISSION OF TWO HOURS FOR DINNER. 

The Moderator called the body to order for the transaction 
of business. Mr. Archibald Johnson and Elder J. D. New- 
ton were appointed reading clerks. 

The roll of the churches was then called and the churches 
responded as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — By letter. 
Asbeborc — Not represented. 
Cen:er Cross — Not represented. 

Denton — J. A. Sniier. W. B. Thompson and W. B. Russell. 
Gravel Hill — By letter. 

Hollowars — H. J. Palmer and Berry R. Cross. 
Huldab — Elias Moore and J. L. Hall. 
Jackson's Creek — John Pierce and Wilson Hughes. 
Jersey — Geo. W. Palmer and Xoah Barnes. 
Lexington — J. W. Xoell and Arthur Gallimore. 
Lick Creek — P. M. Snider, W. L. Feezer and Albert Clayton Reid. 
Maple Springs — Not represented. 
Mount Lebanon — M. J. Leach. 
New Friendship — H. F. Motsinger. 
Oak Hill — Not represented. 

Orphanage — S.- H. Averitt. Venable Wilson and X. B. Moore. 
Pine Meeting House — Francis Barnes, W. D. Green and Joe H. 
Beck. 

Piney Grove — Geo. TV. Wall and Roscoe Wall. 
Reed's Cress Roais — A. £. Myers 
Rich Fork — William Bowers and T. H. Small. 
Stoner's Grove — B. F. Roach. 
. Summerville — Letter on the way. 
Taylor's Grove — Xot represented. 

Thomasville — Archibald Johnson. A. F. Sams and M. S. Stone. 

The body then went into the election of officers. 

On motion of Archibald Johnson, the former officers, viz: 
Moderator, James Smith: Clerk* Henry Sheets and Treasurer, 
S. H. Averitt. were re-elected for the ensuing: year. 

Visiting: brethren were invited to seats. The following 
brethren accepted the invitation : Elder Livingston John- 
son, Corresponding Secretary of State Mission Board: Prof. 
F. P. Hohgood. President of Oxford Female Seminary: Eld- 



4 



er J. S. Farmer, representing the Biblical Recorder; Elder 
S. F. Conrad, for the North Carolina Baptist. Also, Prof. 
P. S. Vann, Principal of Liberty Institute at Wallburg, was 
recognized, on this his first visit to this body. 

The Chair appointed the following named brethren on 
Order of Business: A. Johnson, P. S. Vann and M. L. Kesler. 

This committee at once presented a partial report, which 
follows: 

Religious Exercises, 9:30 a. m. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON. 

Report on Periodicals, 3 to 3:30. 

Report on Old Ministers' Relief, 3:30 to 4. 

Foreign Missions was then made the special order for 8 
o'clock to-night. 

Mr. Archibald Johnson moved that all belated Church 
Letters be handed the Clerk without reading, as it interfered 
with the order of business. ' The motion was unanimously 
carried. 

Elder Jeff Lanning read the 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RELIEF. 

We think that all should take an interest in those who have worn 
themselves out preaching the Gospel and are in need and not able 
to care for themselves. It should be a privilege to care for those 
who have led us to Christ. We heartily commend this work to all 
of our churches. JEFF LANNING. 

An able and helpful discussion was made on this report 
by Livingston Johnson, Prof. F. P. Hobgood and S H. 
Averitt. Pledges for this work were then taken, after 
which it was adopted. 

The report on Periodicals was read by J. S. Farmer. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

This is an age of literature, and those who learn to discriminate 
have a fine art. Let us cling to the Bible, standard literature and 
increase the circulation of our own papers. 

We recommend the Biblical Recorder, the organ of our work in 
North Carolina. It has served our denomination for seventy-two 
years and is now more able to serve than ever before. No Baptist 
family should be without this paper. 

The North Carolina Baptist has done a commendable work in our 
State, especially in the cause of temperance. 

Charity and Children should be in every home. We cannot keep 
in touch with the Orphanage without this paper. No paper of its 
kind in the whole country is its equal. 

We also recommend the Foreign Mission Journal and the Home 
Field. Respectfully submitted, 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 
J. S. FARMER. 



5 



Remarks were then submitted by J. S. Farmer, S. F. 
Conrad, M. L. Kestler and Archibald Johnson. 
Report adopted. 

Elder J. D. Newton read the following resolution : 

Resolved, That we shall have at each successive session of the 
Liberty Association, either in connection with or separate from the 
Report on State Missions, a report also of our Associational Mis- 
sions, giving the names of our missionaries, the places served by 
them under the Board, a statement showing the amount of work 
done and the amount paid for the same by the Board, and the 
outlook, whether encouraging or otherwise. And, furthermore, that 
this report shall be presented either by the Executive Board of the 
Association or by a special committee appointed by the Moderator. 

Respectfully submitted by J. D. NEWTON. 

Adopted without discussion. 

On motion, the Executive Board of this Association, 
elected last year, was re-elected to serve during the ensuing 
year, viz: R. S. Green, Jr., James Smith, William Bowers, 
W. C. Roach and C. M. Wall. 

A good evening's work had been done, after which the 
body adjourned till 8 o'clock to-night. 

Benediction by Elder S. F. Conrad. 



TUESDAY NIGHT. 

August 21st. 

After service of song and prayer Elder M. L. Kestler read 
the report on 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Carrying the Gospel to foreign lands and to alien peoples is the 
most unselfish work we are called upon to do. Going into all the 
world and preaching the Gospel to every creature is the sublime 
answer to the command of the King — a command which assumes 
neither doubt nor the possibility of failure. The ancient forms of 
religion are going into decay; there is in all the world a new 
searching after real truth — the whole world is open to the Gospel, 
the means of communication are so many and so great that ail 
lands have come near our doors, making the opportunity so great 
that the mere neglect of it amounts to a crime. 

The results are not to be measured in a day; the movement is 
ages long. Yet there is the greatest encouragement. When we 
carry the Gospel to the heathen we are at once carrying everything 
that is valuable to them. We are helping them to a better art of 
living — helping education, helping the orphan, the aged and infirm — 
the life which now is and that which is to come. It is the work 
nearest the heart of God and should most engage ours. 

M. L. KESLER, 

For Committee. 



6 



This was a most enlightening and encouraging service. 
The speakers were Elders M. L. Kestler, Livingston John- 
son and J. S. Farmer; at the close of which Bro. John E. 
Ray, of Raleigh, led in prayer that God would call some one 
from our midst to the foreign mission work. Pledges were 
then taken and the report adopted. 

The Moderator appointed brethren J. W. Noell and Joe 
H. Beck a Committee on Finance. 

Brethren Archibald Johnson, A. E. Myers and H. F. 
Motsinger were appointed a Committee on Place and 
Preacher; who, after due consultation, reported Piney Grove 
(Wallburg) as the place, and Elder J. T. Riddick to preach 
the sermon, with Elder S. D. Swaim, alternate. 

The report was adopted. 

The remainder of the Order of Business was reported as 
follows: 

WEDNESDAY. 

9:30 — Devotion. 
10:00— Sunday Schools. 
10 : 30 — Temperance. 
11:00 — State Missions. 

2:00 — Miscellaneous Business. 

2 : 30 — Orphanage. 

3 : 15 — Education. 

THURSDAY. 

9:30— Devotion. 
10:00— Woman's Work. 
11:00 — Home Missions- 
Brother S. H. Averitt moved that Elder J. T. Riddick be 
appointed to fill the vacancy on the Board of Trustees of 
Liberty Institute, made vacant by the removal of Elder W. 
A. Smith, which was carried. 

Brother C. M. Wall was appointed as the Associational 
Representative on the Board of State Missions; and that his 
expenses be paid out of the State Mission Funds, collected 
in the Association. 

Adjourned. Benediction by J. D. Newton. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING. 

August 22nd. 

Religious exercises conducted by Elder Jeff Lanning. 
The < hair extended an invitation to any visiting brother. 
Prof. J. H. Gorrell, of Wake Forest College, and H. E 



7 



Copple, of the Union Association, accepted seats with us. 

Temperance was substituted for the report on Sunday 
Schools as that was not ready. 

Brother S. H. Averitt read the 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

It is of the utmost importance that the moral forces of the State 
should bestir themselves in view of the danger that threatens the 
temperance cause. The liquor power never sleeps. Its minions 
may be defeated, but they are not destroyed. The wonderful ad- 
vance that the cause of temperance has made within the past five 
years is a matter for profound thanksgiving, but the victory is not 
yet won. 

Indeed, we are reaching a crisis on the liquor question and there 
is danger that much of the favorable legislation we have had may 
be paralyzed if not destroyed. Many candidates for the Legisla- 
ture have been nominated who have always trained with the 
liquor forces, and while they are silent now they will speak here- 
after. 

A politician who has been in sympathy with the whisky interests 
is a dangerous man to trust. No matter to what party he belongs, 
he is generally true to his master. He may even make loud pro- 
fessions, but in his heart he is not in sympathy with our side. 

We would urge the Association to take high ground on the tem- 
perance question. We believe that total prohibition is the goal 
toward which we should strive. Anything short of prohibition is 
ineffective if not positively dangerous. We heartily endorse the 
policy of the Anti-Saloon League and would second every effort 
made by this agency for the suppression of the liquor traffic. 

We re-affirm our approval of the laws for the regulation and 
control of the traffic enacted by the General Assembly of 1903 and 
1905, and pledge ourselves so far as possible to the support of men 
who will strengthen rather than weaken these laws. 

We would also recommend to the churches of this Association 
that in exercising discipline they deal with members who drink 
liquor precisely as they deal with other offenders. Many churches 
are rigid in the enforcement of the rule against minor offenses and 
ignore altogether this great evil that brings more misery and woe 
in its train than any other single agency the devil employs. 

S. H. AVERITT, 
J. T. VALENTINE, 

Committee. 

This strong report was spoken to by S. H. Averitt. Re- 
port adopted. 

Prof. John W. Cole read the 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

It has ever been the policy of our Baptist people to train their 
children in what they believe to be in accord with the teachings 
of Christ. As a means by which this may be successfully done the 
Sunday school work has been adopted. We feel especially gratified 
at the progress which has been made, and realizing that the Sun- 
day school work is the leading factor in the development of 
church life, we cannot afford to slacken our efforts in this direc- 
tion. 

It cannot be denied that the Sunday school student sooner or 
later becomes the leading light in our church work. Very seldom 



8 



does the loyal student in the Sunday school wander off into the 
company of the vicious and criminal. He is trained in something 
better. The object of our work in this direction is to prepare our 
boys and girls for loyal, active service in the field of religious en- 
deavor, and wherein we fail in this high mission we incur an inevi- 
table loss to the interest of our noblest work. Then, in the name 
of Christ and for the sake of our boys and girls, let us ever be loyal 
to their training while they are young. 

J. W. COLE, 
P. M. SNIDER, 

Committee. 

Owing to a press for time only one speech could be made, 
which was made by the writer of the report. The report 
was then adopted. 

The hour for the consideration of State Missions having 
arrived, the very able report was read by Editor Archibald 
Johnson. Secretary Johnson made the speech of the day in 
support of this report. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

State Missions is vital to our denominational life. The church 
that cannot be interested in giving the Gospel to every soul in North 
Carolina can hardly be expected to be in sympathy with the work 
of saving the heathen world. 

We have been distressed to see that of the twenty-six churches 
in the Liberty Association, nine of them last year made no con- 
tribution whatever to the work of State Missions. It is true that 
those failing to join in with the others in this all important matter 
have a name to live and are dead, but it is our duty 'to see that so 
far as in us lies this situation shall be changed. 

Furthermore, the contributions to State Missions by the con- 
tributing churches have not enlarged in proportion to the increasing 
prosperity of our churches. Never in all our history has the Lord 
so wonderfully blessed us. He has sent the early and the latter 
rains, our barns are bursting with plenty. Shall we continue to 
drag along at this poor dying rate, unmindful of the bountiful bless- 
ings that have come to us from His hand? 

Last year there were employed under this board one hundred 
and forty missionaries. These men are making heroic sacrifices 
and the blessing of the Lord is upon the work they are doing. In 
destitute sections where the cause has long languished, and where, 
unaided by some outside source of help, they could not stay, they 
are sowing the seeds of truth that are springing up and bearing 
glorious harvests in these barren fields. 

New houses are being built, dead churches are being revived, 
strong Sunday schools are growing up out of the patient labor of 
these tireless workers who have caught a vision of a better day 
in North Carolina, which they may not realize, but which by faith 
they know will come. 

We cannot conceive, unless we had fully surveyed the field, how 
much we are indebted to the State Mission Board for our present 
prosperity as a denomination. Nearly all our strong churches were 
at one time helped on their feet by the timely aid of this Board. 
We have an example in the church in which we meet to-day of 
the fine results of help and sympathy when the night was dark and 
the road was rough and steep. 

All over North Carolina this good work has been going on, and 



9 



yet the stretches of destitution are vast and the fields white to the 
harvest. 

We commend to all our churches the urgent call that comes to 
us to sustain the State Mission Board in the work of uplifting our 
good State and placing within the reach of every man and woman 
and child in North Carolina the Gospel as we hold it. 

Thirtythousand dollars will be required to pay the meager sal- 
aries of the missionaries, and of this amount only about $5,000 has 
been raised. Brethren, let us not be laggards in this work of love. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 
WM. BOWERS. 



v AFTERNOON SESSION. 

August 22nd. 

The body was called to order. The matter of the publi- 
cation of the history of the Liberty Association was taken 
up and discussed. 

Mr. Archibald Johnson offered the following: 

Resolved, That the Liberty Association assume the financial re- 
sponsibility of the publication of the history prepared by Bro. 
Henry Sheets. 

This was adopted unanimously. 

On motion, the following brethren were appointed a Com- 
mittee on Publication, viz: J. W. Noell, P. S. Vann and G. 
Foster Hankins, whose duty it is to carry the will of the 
Association into execution. 

G. P. Harrill offered the following: 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

Rev. M. S. Kesler was elected to the general management of 
the Orphanage one year ago. It seems that the Trustees were 
specially guided by the Lord in their selection of him to fill this 
position. His work with the other employees of the Orphanage 
has been harmonious and agreeable. It is but a modest expres- 
sion to say that he possesses the affectionate confidence of the 
children as well as the employees. 

During the past year much work has been done. The work of 
Charity and Children cannot be measured by the increased sub- 
scription list, though this one fact of increased number of readers 
does indicate its growing usefulness. The farm has been worth 
more to the Orphanage the past year than any previous year, and 
at the same time it is being steadily improved by terracing, deep 
plowing, rotation of crops, clearing of stumps and stones, and in- 
telligent use of fertilizers. The shoe shop has been enlarged, and 
a greater number of boys are now employed, which means its use- 
fulness is increased, since its prime object is the training of boys. 
It appears that the machine shop has finally reached the point of 
paying something above expenses. And now, last but greatest of 
all, the regular work of the Orphanage — greater than all the rest 
combined — the school, has been successful. Although the epidemic 



10 



of pneumonia stopped the work for a while, at the end of the year 
it was known that great work had been done. 

A steam laundry is being installed, the* Durham House has been 
finished, a convenient and commodious cow barn built, a horse 
barn and granary that surpasses anything of the kind in the county 
erected, the equipment of Charity and Children much improved, 
and the Orphanage grounds beautified by grading, road-making, 
hedge-setting and flower-planting, which we believe is only an 
earnest of what shall be done in future years to make the grounds 
one of the most attractive spots in North Carolina. 

More than half of the eleven thousand dollars debt reported at 
the last session of the Association has been paid. 

Let us close the report by calling attention to the greatest need 
of the Orphanage — a monthly contribution from every Baptist Sun- 
day school in North Carolina. 

G. P. HARRILL, 
T. H. SMALL. 

This stirring report brought out a live, interesting discus- 
sion. The interest was such, that the Association voted 
(by a standing vote) to build a Libert) Association Taber- 
nacle, that will seat at our annual meetings, at least 5,000 
people. 

To carry out this motion the Moderator appointed the 
following committee : C. M. Wall, J. W. Noell and A. F. 
Sams. 

It is hoped that the people will rally around this com- 
mittee, filling their hands with means to build this pavilion 
for the accommodation of the visitors who attend the annual 
meetings. 

It is ordered that the Clerk have five hundred copies of 
these Minutes printed and that he be allowed $10.00 for his 
services. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

For seventy-one years Wake Forest College has been training 
and educating young men for our pulpits, schools and every other 
profession in life, and many of her students have become the lead- 
ing farmers in the State. To-day there is not a profession or a 
branch of business in which Wake Forest men do not stand in the 
lead. 

The Baptist University for Women, though established only seven 
years ago, now enjoys a patronage of over three hundred students 
and the work she has already done in educating the noble woman- 
hood of our State will pay back to our denomination every dollar 
with more than a thousand per cent, interest. But the work of 
these institutions cannot be measured by dollars, and we sin 
where we try to do so. To liberally support these institutions 
means to carry forward every department of our denominational 
work. Then we put forth our best efforts to encourage and sup- 
port these our institutions. 

Chowan Baptist Female Institute and Oxford Female Seminary 
have for many years been doing noble work in educating our girls 
and we rejoice at their success. 



11 



LIBERTY INSTITUTE. 

We feel grateful for the work that our associational school, Lib- 
erty Institute at Wallburg, has already done in the training of our 
boys and girls. The Institute has already won a warm place in 
the hearts of many of our people. We are determined to put forth 
every effort in our power to encourage the work and induce our 
people to patronize our school. We realize the fact that we must 
centralize our forces and make a strenuous effort to arouse our boys 
and girls to a sense of their duty to educate their minds and hearts 
for the work God will give them to do. 

This report was discussed by Prof. P. S. Vann, Prof. J. 
H. Gorrell and Archibald Johnson. Pledges were taken 
and report adopted. 

Announced that Elder Livingston Johnson will preach in 
this house to-night at 8 o'clock. 

Treasurer Averitt read his report to the body, which 
follows : 

iEASURE . S REPORT. 
Receipts. 



For Foreign Missions $62.29 

For Home Missions 44.81 

For State Missions 101.36 

For Sunday school work and colportage 9.07 

For Education 41.33 

For Ministerial Relief 17.50 

For Minute Fund 25.98 



Total receipts $302.34 

Disbursements. 

For Foreign Missions $62.29 

For Home Missions 44 . 81 

For State Missions 101.36 

For Sunday school work and colportage 9.07 

For Education 41.33 

For Ministerial Relief ' 17^50 

For Minute Fund 25.98 



Total Disbursements $302.34 



Respectfully, 
S. H. AVERITT, Treasurer. 

Report adopted. 

The Moderator appointed the following brethren to write 
on the subjects indicated below : 

On State Missions — G. P. Harrill, Wm. Bowers. 

On Home Missions— J. D. Newton, J. T. Valentine. 

On Foreign Missions— J. T. Riddick, J. W. Noell. 

On Periodicals— Archibald Johnson, M. S. Stone. 

On Education— P. S. Vann, Geo. W. Wall. 

On Orphanage— M. L. Kesler, R. S. Green, Jr. 

On Sunday Schools— Jeff Lanning, L. A. Tysinger. 



12 



On Minister's Relief— S. D. Swaim, R. K. Williams. 
On Temperance — Joe H. Beck, John W. Cole. 
On Obituaries — H. Morton, P. M. Snider. 
On Woman's Work— S. H. Averitt, C. M. Wall. 

Adjourned till to-morrow morning 9:30 o'clock. Bene- 
diction by M. J. Leach. 



THURSDAY MORNING. 

August 23rd. 
Religious exercises conducted by Elder S. D. Swaim. 
Brother Archibald Johnson read the report on 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

No department of our mission is more hopeful than that of the 
women, which is being pushed with so great zeal throughout our 
State. We note with gratitude its constantly widening influence 
in our churches. 

Without separating it from the general work of the churches, it 
permits the women to do their work in their own way unhampered 
by less progressive brethren who stickle over methods, and dis- 
courage rather than stimulate the mission spirit. It not only de- 
velops and nourishes the grace of giving, but it disseminates mis- 
sionary information without which no sustained or permanent mis- 
sionary effort is possible. 

In addition to the special work among the adults, a great work' 
is being done through this agency by the children banded together 
under the bright name of Sunbeams. These children are growing 
up in a missionary atmosphere that means large things for the 
cause in future years. We have observed that as soon as a mission- 
ary society is established in a church the motherly instinct of the 
members turns them toward the children. 

We regret that in the bounds of the Liberty Assocation we have 
but three Woman's Missionary Societies and urge our sisters in the 
different churches to address themselves to the work of organizing. 
The marvellous success that has attended those already established 
proves the necessity of such organization in every church. 

The missionary spirit has been mightily quickened throughout 
our church life where a live woman's missionary society exists, and 
this influence upon the community at large is in every way helpful 
and uplifting. 

We hope that within the year to come the number of societies 
in our Association will be largely increased and that at Wallburg 
next summer, at the meeting of the Association an organization of 
the societies in the body may be effected. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON. 

Remarks were made on this report by Henry Sheets, 
Archibald Johnson, Livingston Johnston and S. D. Swaim. 
On motion, the report was adopted. 

The report on Home Missions was read by Secretary 
Johnson. 



13 



HOME MISSIONS. 



The Home Mission Board is located in Atlanta, Ga. Dr. B. D. 
Gray is Corresponding Secretary, andi Rev. J. F. Love, a North Caro- 
linian, is Assistant! Secretary. Rev. A. E. Brown, another North 
Carolina man, has supervision of the work among the mountains. 

Several important departments are under the direction of the 
Home Board. Perhaps the most important work of the Board is 
that being done in the rapidly growing cities of the South. During 
the past ten years the total population of Baltimore, St. Louis and 
New Orleans increased 400,000. The net increase of the Baptist 
churches in these cities has been only 1,300. The gain of these 
cities in population has been three hundred times as great as the 
gain of membership in their Baptist churches. A stream of for- 
eign population is constantly pouring into each of these and other 
cities of the South. It is evident that unless we Christianize these 
foreigners they will greatly affect our Christianity in these strong- 
holds of the South. 

On the frontier the Home Board is doing important work. What 
we call the "frontier" embraces the States of Missouri, Arkansas, 
Louisiana, Texas and Oklahoma — a territory of 499,320 square 
miles, with a population of 10,500,000. In addition to furnishing 
preachers, the Board is aiding this vast territory in building 
churches. 

In Cuba the work is in a prosperous condition. While we do 
not hear as much about it now as in the palmy days of Diaz, we 
have every reason to believe that it is on a much more solid foun- 
dation. 

In the mountain regions of the South the Board is doing an ex- 
ceedingly important educational work. Schools are being founded 
and fostered throughout this section by the Home Board. North 
Carolina has more of these schools and receives a larger appro- 
priation for their support than any other State. The future of 
our cause in the mountains depends largely upon the work of these 
schools. Although, with one exception, they have been in opera- 
tion in our State less than a decade, their influence is being 
greatly felt. 

At the last Convention a new department was created, called 
"the work of evangelism." The Board was instructed to employ 
a man as the head of this department with as many assistants as 
they deemed wise to employ, provided the amount expended on 
this department would not exceed $25,000. Dr. W. W. Hamilton 
has been secured as head of this department. There is consid- 
erable doubt in the minds of many as to the wisdom of this new 
movement, but time will vindicate its wisdom or show its folly. 
For the first year the Board does not contemplate spending more 
than $7,000 on this department, and tha't amount will, no doubt, be 
contributed to Home Missions by the points at which the evangel- 
ists will hold meetings. As this will not take anything out of the 
treasury of the Board, let us hold our opinions in abeyance untii 
the experiment shall have been tried. Meantime, let us give our 
loyal support to the Board because of its work in other departments 
about whose importance there can be no question. 



Livingston Johnson spoke to the report, after which 
pledges were taken. 

Report adopted. 



H. MORTON, 
R. S. GREENE. 



14 



Verbal reports were made in regard to some delinquent 
churches. 

On motion of G. P. Harrill, the churches at Maple Springs, 
Centre Cross, Marion and Asheboro, be written to by the 
Clerk, Henry Sheets, to report at the next session of this 
body, otherwise they will be dropped from the roll of 
churches. 

The following brethren were appointed as delegates to 
the Southern Baptist Convention : S. D. Swaim; his alter- 
nate, Prof. P. S. Vann. 

Delegates to the State Baptist Convention were appointed 
as follows : G. P. Harrill, J. W. Noell and P. S. Vann. 

S. D. Swaim offered the following : 

VOTE OF THANKS. 

Resolved, That the Association record a vote of thanks to the 
Baptist church and the people of Thomasville for their abundant 
hospitality. 

This was adopted by a rising vote. 

Elder H. Morton offered the following, in order that those 
appointed to write on obituaries may be able to make notice 
of all who die, from one session to the next : 

Resolved: That, the churches be requested to report the names 
of those that die during the year, together with their age. 

It was adopted. 

The work being done, we adjourned to meet one year 
hence at Wallburg. 

The work was done without undue haste. It was entirely 
harmonious. The Holy Spirit was with us and joy beamed 
from every face. Enlargement was in the air and every 
worker left Thomasville full of hope for a better , year's 
work than we have ever accomplished in any year of the 
past. 

The music by the Choir was fine, indeed, and called forth 
many words of appreciation from delegates and visitors. 

The last Hymn — " God be with you till we meet again," 
was sung most tenderly, and all felt the power of this song. 

Pastor G. P. Harrill touched us all with the closing 
prayer. 

The Lord be praised for His presence. 

JAMES SMITH, Moderator. 

Henry Sheets, Secretary. 



15 

Work of the Woman's Missionary Societies 
and Sunbeams. 



There were two of these Societies last year — Lexington 
and Thomasville. One more has recently been added to 
the number — Wallburg. The Liberty Association is fortu- 
nate in having these three societies within her bounds. 
They are doing a fine work and exerting a wholesome influ- 
ence on the work of this body. 

Some of the results have been startling and the eyes of 
the whole body are on these societies, and they are destined 
ere long to influence the work of the women in all of our 
churches, and will prove a strong agency in revolutionizing 
the work here in our midst. 

All hail to the Christian women ! They are showing 
their brethren what consecration can do for God's Kingdom. 

SOCIETIES IN LEXINGTON CHURCH. 

The Society has„a membership of 33. Mrs. S. L. Owen, Lexing- 
ton, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTION. 



Building and Repairing $ 3.10 

State Missions 8.00 

Home Missions 5.75 

Foreign Missions 14.95 

Aid Fund in Bank 50.00 



Total of work done $81.80 



Sunbeams. 

Miss Mabel Tucker, Lexington, N. C, is President. The Society 
has a membership of 14. 

Societies in Thomasville Church. 

This Society has enrolled a membership of 20. 
Miss Maggie Morton, Thomasville, N. C, is President. The So- 
ciety has contributed as follows: 



State Missions $43.61 

Home Missions 64.85 

Foreign Missions 35.30 

Other objects 10.40 



Total $154.16 




16 



Sunbeams. 

Miss Isabelle Cecil, Thomasville, N. Q., is President. The mem- 
bership is 15. 

Society in Piney Grove Church. 

This Society, recently organized, has an enrollment of 8. 
Mrs. C. M. Wall, Wallburg, N. C, is President. 



Contributions. . 

Home Missions $5.50 

Foreign Missions 5.50 

In Treasury 2.25 



Total $13.25 

Total contributions by these Societies $249.21 



17 



TABLE OF PLEDGES FOR 1906-1907. 



CHURCHES. 





CO 


CO 




a 


O 


.2 


"53 


°co 


CO 


Mis 


3 

S 






£ 


'53 


o 


or 







Abbott's Creek 

Asheboro 

Center Cross 

Denton .... 

Gravel Hill 

Holloway's 

Huldah 

Jackson's Creek 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

Maple Springs 

Marion 

Mount Lebanon 

New Friendship 

Oak Hill 

Orphanage 

Pine Meeting House. 

Piney Grove 

Reed's Cross Roads. . 

Rich Fork 

Stoner's Grove 

Summerville 

Taylor's Grove 

Thomasville 



$15 00$ 5 00 $12 00 



25 



$22 50 



$ 5 00 



$ 4 00 



$ 63 50 



00, 
00 
00 
00 
00 



7 00 

8 00 
16 00 

1 00 

2 00 
20 < 
75 00 
12 00 
12 00 



15 00 
9 00 
20 00 
1 50 
4 CO 
20 00 
75 00 
12 50 
15 00 



2 00 
2 00 
5 00 
1 00 



15 



()0 

00 
3 00 
3 00 



25 



00 40 

001 14 
00! 50 
00 22 
00 9 

00 4 

001 . 
... 2 
OOj 35 



1 00 
3 00 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 

7 00 

3 00 
3 00 
1 50 

"50 



1 00 
1 50 



38 50 
31 50 
67 50 

5 50 
8 00 
83 00 
245 00 

39 50 
45 00 



11 00 
66 50 

10 00 
185 00 

71 00 
167 00 
66 50 
40 00 
24 20 
3 05 

11 00 
107 50 



Totals 324 00 154 Oo!406 75 398 00 80 00 



54 00 $1416 75 



18 



•S3Suadxg[ 

looqog 



» o w o 'o o 

tJh CO ZD lO CO CO 



•uado %d9y[ 

sq^uoK 



oa 01 oj co 



CM Oi <M Ol CM Ol 



Ot»OOCiO • o 
CO T*l C at £- lO -CO 
CO -i— 1 i— 1 



Aa^aqn 111 



qooqog -ox 



OOQN 1^ -CO 

CO lO CO CO O 'CO 

1H CO 



jeqranj^ 



OS SO 
O? 



'Sjeqo'BojL 

puis saooyjo 



CQ UO 00 CC CO 



Q 

K . 

<| cc 
H 

CO CD 

M ft 

W ft 

-U o 

i ^ 



CO . CP 

Qi§ > 

co rz 

CD ^ 

.2 c3 
£5 = * 



too £ 
C £3 

as 



03 

-5 CO 



CD 

3 o • o 

O o S.h cp c 



CD 



bJO 



. o 



CO 



CD . 
Sh — ' 

o ~ 

- 

' ^ X3 ■ M > — 

cd fH'-r • O O cgPn 

CD CO . o p 53 

CP , — 1 — > " — CD 

_r oq Oj - hh „ „ 

13 2 cJ £ CD-' >-c3 

3 ■ o £~ 2 5 

PnPS^j^jf^^cO 



3* 



- 53 
"o C^ 

-ta ^3 — w 
- S- CD 
O 0> G 

c^a^ o 

CD CD . . <£ 



M bJD 
G 



O 
O 

cd 5 -r cd" £ 

£ * H P ^ 

~ s- £ *H 











• ' 2" 




CD 




' CO 






P 




: : be 


d co 




r 5 






0^ 



3 33 « - - 

22 > <5 PQ CO 5," crj 

.. <D . * . 

o . . 



5 ^ sf ^ d 



^3 • 

CD 

« CO 
CO O -33 

Sill 

<OQO 



02 



O 

be « 



CO 

-J cp .f- 



. C3 
G co 



'^2 5 



— 1- 



CP 

— ~ 



' CO 75 



i 2 i 
' QUQu 



CO c o a 



3 5 

fj CO 



19 





<© ■ - Oi CO O W OJ OO - CO o 
H : — f CNJ t- 1-1 rH 




• CO r-c 4 


■ Tt* GO OS CO OS lO a* CM CD 
• <M H rH 


CO 




(— , (*y"*i rv*i *r-H fY - *! rv^\ 




• c§ S 


• rn os lo go co ci • :o t- 

CO t— i LO OS CD CO -rnCO 


1448 




OS ■XhCOOOOO^CSH 




• i— ' 

• ~H -HH 


COOOlOC^TjH'* ■ GO LO 
■ ' — CO CO CO CO CM • C3 


o 
o 
as 




... . o • 




CO 


• CO o • • • 






co • co cm co as t> -to ■ 






co ■ • 


• CO -CM 


co 


Lost. 




CO • CO CQ CO 




CO OS XtH TtH 




• 


rH CO 


r- CO 


CD 
CI 




CO CJ iHTf 




| CO t— 1 CO 




• CO 


TH rH — ■ 




CO 
CO 






r- 




CO — . ■ i-H 




LO 

CO 


passiaisiQ 


CO • • • o 


• co W CO c- • 




-OINNCC ■ CO 





t^LOGOcooscoosascM 



Aq 
p8Aiaoa^j 



CO rH CD rH 



CO lO N CO 13 rH rH J> « 



C^r£« 
2 i° "* ' 

p V.W 

Jh 



Mh'^ 



Nip 



Hp> 
. o . . . 

o^hh-hcq 



CO 

rP 
cp . 

§ B 
S.2 

r,CL 
5 P 

r? O 



o 

o 

p ~ M s 

CP „ « *, 

8rP 03rS 

" S'3 



; t-^r-5Ck 



- P 

-S3 

bjD M 

02 P 

fa* 

flj *H 



be 
p 

8^ e3 



cd 



, 03 O '> 



CD O 

o o M o 



a - £p C3 

J ^ s 

03^00 
5h 



£ £ h," QD g 55 ps ^ a H 



CP 

P +3 +3 CP 
O >H Sh r-H 

O O c3 
QC Dh P-t> 

• £ 8 
. o 

Or5r^^ 



r* 

CO 

o 8 



Q 



51 



• CP Ph 



l CO 
CP 



• P 
o 

:w 
: be 
. p 

CP TS 

be 



• c3 

• O 



2 S 

CP 

P 03 

.S CP 

PhPh 



• CP 

• > 

• o 

O OQ 
~!h 

rH ® 

r^ p 

.2 o 



CP 

> 

r2 2^ 
r^ OS 

> > 

a ^ S3 

gr2 a 

S C3 -P 











































o 










































CO 




o? 


• -hi 


GO 


O CO 


I- CO 




OS 


t- • 




-f 




f- 


t> 


c> 




"O 




• -f 


CO 


o 




CO 


• OS 


OS 




I- 


CO 


CO 


OI • 


• Ol 




CO 


i~ 


c> 


r. 


' - 


-t 


OS 


• CO 


IO 


i> 




Ol 






c? 


CN 




— ' 


Ol • 




<M 




iO 


CO 


cc 


Oi 








CO 


Ol 








































CO 




































iC o o 










■ CO 


o 




CO O 


oi 


o 


Ol • 


• CO 


o 


JO 


o 


cb 


K 


o 


o 


i> CO iO 


o 


OS 




o> 






H 


CO 


CO 


1 — 1 


1—1 




Ol 






o> 


03 


M 


»— ' 






o? 


OS 




€©■ 


' 














■ 






















Oi 












































•s^oaLqo -idqiO 




'. 




! 










■ T 




















IO 


CO 




• i/o 


iO 


CO • 




o 


, — 1 




• 


o> 






>C 


t- 




co 






CO 


CO 






■ lO 




(M • 




o 


Ol 




; »— 1 








CO 












03 


CO 
















































• © 


co 


O O 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


• o 


o 




o 


CO 


o 


o 


1- 


o 




o 


CO 


§ 




CO 


CO TjH 


O Oi 


o 


o 


iO • 


o 






o 


iO 


o 


o 


iO 


IO 


;8 


o 


OS 


SJ^SIUIJ^ p[(j 




• CO 




CO 


1-1 ^JH 


IO 


O* 










iO 




iO 


CO 


co 


I— 1 


• I— 1 


CO 




tioptfonpg 


o 
o 


■ o 

o 


o 

lO 


o • 
o • 


• o 

• o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o • 

o 




§ 


g 


o 


g 


o 

iO 


o 

CO 


o? 

iO 


o 


• o 

■ uO 


o 
o 


OS 






■ (M 


H 


iO • 


• GO 


iO 


CO 


CO • 




CD 




o 
o> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


1— 1 




CM 


CO 
OS 


•S[Ooqog puB 


o 

.... . . . . . ..... 


o 
o 



•o2mii3qd.io 



•SU0ISSIj^[ 



OOOOOOiOCOO 
OOOOOOC-rrO 



saoissip\[ 9inof{ 



•suoissii\[ oi^y 



jooqog A^pung 



•sj^uapiou] 



puB SnipjinQ 



lOOOOOOOiOO 
t-ffliCCOCOiCOi>0 

rH l-H OS »-H 



0) . c . 

= a o • 

> i= be a 
w bo c o 



o a 

a bc-£ 
o a bo 

a M.g- 

3) © ^ D a - . - - - 



a -a * c M 

X cp cp cp 



H 1>3 B 

a a. cO 
* • 'a cp .2 . 
ja ■£ S-a 3 — 



« g£ S o 

CP CP 



CP ... . 
a- ® ' ' ' £ 
'>r: a 3 a^ 

03 co ^ fec^S as 

O ™ tiCn 
g a ._ 



i 2 m <"'m 2 

- ^ co ^ - 

?a«aa 

S-> .i—l <X) .rH 

vim ^cvqw 

JcTDr-s^ffi^i^^O t-a' Q ob a 73 d 



» 15 rS 



o o 



£50 



a : 
0005 
+=> ■*= a 
a a a § 

CP CP CP w 

PQQg 



be be bo_ r 

S a a.-a 
'a 'a 'a £ 
a p a 03 
03 03 c3 hnj 

CP CP CP J 



44 . 

CP 

CP CO 

Sh co 



bfi 

• a 

9^ ft 



.CP .rj-J . © . 

■ 2 -o3 • > 

• 5 cp o • o <u 

a -h w ^ oj ft w >.2_ cp a 



.43 . 
a _co . 

O • 

a a • 

03 CP_; 



CP • 

> ■ 

O CP 



S+a'S r^^^OM CUM fv, > k ^ ' JH CP CP CJ rj 



cvQcvdHH 



JF 



it 



MINUTES of the 
Seventy -Fourth Annual Session 

(Seventy-Fifth Anniversary) 

OF 

Liberty Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Wallburg Baptist Church 

AUGUST 20, 21, 22, 1907 



MINUTES 

OF THE 



Seventy-Fourth Annual Session 

Seventy-Fifth Anniversary 



OF 



Liberty Baptist Associati 



ion 



HELD WITH 



Wallburg Baptist Church, 

August 20th, 2 1 st, and 22nd, 1907. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Moderator: J W. Noell, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk: P. S. Vann, Wallburg, N C 

Treasurer: S. H. Averitt, Thomasville N C 



PLACE TIME, AND PREACHER OF INTRODUCTORY SERMO.V FOR THE 
SESSION AUGUST, 1908 

Pi-each the sermon; Elder Lnry AKern-ate ' L " KeSler to 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 
AUGUST, 1907. 



Addtrton. W. S Denton, N. C. 

HarriU, G. P Thomasville, N. C. 

Lanning, Jeff ...... . . . Denton, N. C. 

Kesler, M. L Thomasville, N. C. 

Leach, M. J Lassiter, N. C. 

Morton, H Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D Thomasville, N. C. 

Sheeets, Henry Lexington, N. C 

Swaim, S. D. . . . Lexington, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

R S. GREEN, Jr., JAMES SMITH, C. M. WALL. 

R. K. WILLIAMS. J. W. NOELL. 



Proceedings. 



Wallburg Baptist Church, 

August 20, 1907, 

The messengers from the churches composing the Lib- 
erty Baptist Association convened with this church to-day, 
in its seventy-fourth annual session. By special request 
Br. R. T. Vann preached the introductory sermon. He 
used as his text, Mark 5 :19 : "Go home to thy friends 
and tell them how great things the Lord hath done for 
thee, and hath compassion on thee," His sermon was 
beautiful and very helpful to us all. 

INTERMISSION OF ONE AND ONE-HALF HOURS 
FOR DINNER. 

i: At two o' clock the Moderator called the Association 
to order for business. Bro. L. Johnson led in prayer. 

The Moderator appointed the following to read the 
church letters, J. W. Noell and R. S. Green, Jr. 

The roll of churches was called and they responded as 
follows: 

Abbott's Creek— C. H. Teague, N* R, Teague and J. R. Phillip* 
Asheboro — By letter. 
Center Cress — By letter. 

Denton— W. B. Thompson and C. H. Tysinger. 
Gravel Hill— William A. Russell. 
Holloway's — By letter. 
Jackson's Creek — By letter. 
Jersey. 

Lexington — J. W. Noell, J. D. Walser and R. B. Miller. 
Lick Creek — W. Alex Stoker, Jno. Skeen and J. L. Snider 
Liberty — J. M. Easter, J. A. Hepler and Martin Williams. 
Maple Springs- — By letter. 
Mount Lebanon — By letter. 

Oak Hill— M. F. Underwood and C. M. Royals. 

Orphanage' — M. L. Kesler, S. H. Averitt and J. F. Clinard. 

Pine Metting House — A. R. Williams. 

Reed's Cross Roads — B. 0. Meyers and Lloyd Craver. 

Rich Fork — J. Mills Newton and T. H. Small. 

Stoner's Grove— B. F. Roach and J. H. Wafford. 

Summerville — By letter. 

Taylor's Grove — C. L. Bailey and H. J. Bailey. 
Thomasville — R. S. Green, A. Johnson and H. Morton. 
Wallburg— C. M. Wall, J. E. Motsinger and J. A. Divinette, 

A. Johnson and S. D. Swaim were appointed to arrange 
the programme for this session. 

The Association elected the following officers: J. W 
Noell, Moderator; P. S. Vann, Clerk; S. H. Averitt. 
Treasurer, for the ensuing year. 

The Association very warmly expressed its appreciation 



4 



of the efficient and faithful services which Bro. James 
Smith, as Moderator, and Bro. Henry Sheets, as Clerk, 
have rendered for many years. These men are greatly 
loved for their faithfulness. 

An invitation was extended to visiting: brethren. The 
following responded: 

Pres. R. T. Vann, Baptist University for Women. 

h. Johnson, Secretary of State Missions. 

Pres F. B. Hobgood, Oxford Female Seminary. 

S. F. Conrad, North Carolina Baptist. 

J. B. Carlyle, Wake Forest College. 

B. F. Parham, of the Flat River Association. 

W. H. Davis, of the West Chowan Association. 

The chair appointed J. D. Newton and C. M. Wall 
finance committee. 

S. D. Swaim reported for the committee on arrange- 
ment of the programme. This afternoon, State Missions. 
This evening at eight o'clock, Education. 

G. P. Harrill read the 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

As an incentive to rally around our state mission flag we recom- 
mend the re-reading of the first paragraph in Secretary Johnson's 
report before the State Convention in Greensboro last December. 
What State Missions has done for the cause of Christ in Greensboro 
it has done on a smaller scale in a great number of communities in 
North Carolina. 

There are now over one hundred and fifty State Missionaries em- 
ployed by the State Mission Board for all or a part of their time 
These men reported at last convention over two thousand baptisms, 
sixty-six church houses under construction, and twenty-one finished 

during the year. 

When the brethren heard the report on State Missions at Greens- 
boro and the animated discussion that followed, they seemed eager 
to undertake greater things. Tney voted heartily to appropriate 
forty thousand dollars to State Missions for this year. This is 
thirty three and one third per cent, more than we raised for the 
previous year. Let us all bear this in mind when we make our 
contributions this fall. - 

Paul says to the Galations, "Let him that is taught in the word 
communicate unto him that teacheth all good things." It seems 
that whole churches as well as indivudal Christians hear and heed 
this injunction. We know of an exception to the rule, that where 
a church has been helped by the State Mission Board, when too 
weak to exist without its aid, you will find a strong missionary 
body when it has reached the point of self support. Let us then re- 
joice that such a large per cent of the newly constituted churches 
in the State have been organized under the direction and support of 
the State Mission Board. 

G. P. HARRILL, 
Wm. BOWERS. ; 

The report was discussed by: G. P. Harrill, L. John- 1 
son, R. S. Green, Jr., Henry Sheets and J. B. Carlyle. f \ 
Pledges were then taken for State Missions, amounting 



5 



to $427.50, an inerease of $105.50 over last year's pledges. 
The report was adopted. 

J. S. Farmer of the Biblical Recorder, was recognized. 

Announcements were made and the Association was ad- 
journed to eight o'clock in the evening. Prayer by G. P. 
Harrill. 

TUESDAY NIGHT'S SESSION. 

Body was called to order by the Moderator at eight 
)'clock. Prayer by Thomas Carrick. 
P. S. Vann read the 

REPORT ON EDUCATION AS TO OUR COLLEGES. 

There was never a time when it was so necessary that we, as a 
lenomination, should stand firmly together in liberal support of our 
denominational schools. The time has come when we must stand 
Cor our rights by educating our boys and girls in our own denomina- 
tional schools. If our religious beliefs and doctrines are founded 
upon the New Testament Teachings and if we know this fact we 
should do all in our power to inculcate Baptist principles into the 
minds and hearts of our youth. 

Wake Forest college now enjoys an enrollment of over 350 stu- 
dents. 

The University for Women at Raleigh now has over 350 students. 

Graduates from these, institutions easily take the fron< rank in 
progress of education, business and every honorable work in our 
State. 

Oxford Female Seminary and Chowan Baptist Female Institute 
have done a lasting work for the upbuilding of our noble women. 
5fear after year their patronage increases. We rejoice in their prog- 
ress. 

This report was discussed by P. S. Vann, J. B. Carlyle, 
■ T. Vann and G. P. Harrill. 

Moved by A. Johnson that the report be tabled until to- 
morrow morning's session. 

By request R. T. Vann sang "My Aain Countree" for 
the Association. It was enjoyed greatly. 

The meeting was then adjourned. Prayer by Jeff. Lan- 
tiing. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING'S SESSION, AUG. 21. 

At nine-thirty devotional exercises were conducted by 
I. S. Farmer. 

At ten o'clock the Association was called to order by its 
Moderator. 

On motion of A. Johnson the report on Education was 
taken from the table and Pres. F. P. Hobgood was given 
ten minutes to tell of Oxford Female Seminary. The re- 
port on Education was adopted. 

! The Moderator announced the following committees: 
Committee on place and preacher: G. W. Wall, B. O. 



6 



Myers, and J. D. Walse.r. 

Committee to nominate Executive Board: A. Johnson, 
Henry Sheets and Jeff. Lanning. 

A,. Johnson read the 



REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

In secular affairs, especially in the political realm, the newspaper] 
Is a prime necessity. It is the defense and the despair of the candi-j 
date. He is utterly dependent on the friendship of the editors who j 
defend him and he is powerless to dodge the shafts of those who 
oppose him. Between the two the people are usually able to form 
conclusions that are about right. The trade journals are becoming 
more and more a factor in the business world, and almost every im-1 
pcrtant line has its particular crgan ; even the liquor traffic finds a ^j 
hoarse voice through its newspaper. The children of this world 
are wiser in their generation than the children of light. Farmers," 
merchants, manufacturers, bankers, lawyers, doctors and many 
other trades and professions, feel the necessity of keeping in close 
touch with their work by means of their organs, but thousands of 
christians blunder along through life as blind as bats. 

A clear, pane, honest denominational voice is an absolute ne- 
cessity, Without it we could not keep our battle line intact. The 
call to our great host must reach the ranks. The independent 
churches' must recognize their inter-independence. The stimulus 
f'rem the brotherhocd must stir our indivudual hearts. We must 
join hands with our bretheren in the onward movements of our 
host. These things can be accomplished only through the ac- 
cepted medium which becomes the expression of an organized' 
unit. 

The Biblical Recorder has been for seventy years the agency] 
through which our people have given expressions to their wishes. 
Its editors have not always been wise but they have always been 
true to the general principles for which we stand. Into every 
Baptist home in the Association the Recorder ought to go; and 
into every home where the inmates are thoroughly interested in 
the progress of our principles, it does go. 

The North Carolina Baptist is throughly loyal to all our work 
and has been a blessing to thousands of our people. The Home 
Field serves a useful purpose in furnishing information concern- 
ing the great work of the Home Mission Board; the Foreign Mis- 
sion Journal represents the greatest of all objects — the evange- 
lization of the whole wide world. 

Our Sunday School should find joy in using the literature pro- 
vided by our Sunday School Board. Charity and Children is the 
organ of our Orphanage. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 
M. S. STONE, 

Committee, 

This report was discussed by A. Johnson, J. S. Farmer, 
S, F. Conrad and R. S. Green. 

The report was adopted. 

0. L. Powers. Pickett and Burton of the Piedmont wer< 
recognized. 



At 11:45 a. m. the report on the Orphanage was read by 
M. L. Kesler. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE, 

ine Thomasville Baptist Orphanage stands in our midst and 
should be no stranger to us. 

During the twenty-two years of its history it nas sheltered near- 
ly one thousand children. When our room is all taken this Fall 
tfe will have in the neighborhood of 375 children. The health of 
the institution has been excellent, we could hardly ask for a better 
health record than we have had during the past year. 

Contributions have been good through the year, though for the 
past few months we have been running behind. Last fall the old 
iebt was practically wiped out. The need now is that the people 
rise to the larger task of taking care of the larger number of chil- 
dren. When all the room is taken about $600 dollars will be needed 
every week. Our people must be aroused to the realization of the 
fact that the pledges of last year are too small to take care of the 
Orphanage this year. 

One year ago this body decided to build an arbor on the Orphan- 
age grounds and appointed a committee to take the matter in hand. 
A. short while after this it was learned that the Davie County 
churches proposed to the trustees that they were willing to move 
the Mocksville arbor to the Orphanage allowing the proceeds from 
the sale of the lot to pay f of" moving and rebuilding. So it seemed 
best to the committee from the association to yield to the Mocks- 
ville movement and of course made no effort to raise money for 
that purpose. Your committee beg leave to suggest that our asso- 
ciation show its interest in the Orphanage by providing two rooms 
in the new infirmary. It can be done by and in the name of the 
women of the Liberty Association. 

This building, along with the Noah Richardson Library will go 
up this Fall if present plans do not miscarry. 

We urge, in conclusion, that every Sunday school take monthly 
collections for the Orphanage and that each Sunday school take a 
club of charity children and that each church make a Thanksgiv- 
ing offering at the appointment nearest Thanksgiving dav. 

M. L. KESLER, 
R. S. GREEN, Jr. 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by M. L. Kesler, Thos. Car- 
nek, J. W. Noell, H. Sheets, S. H. Averitt, A. Johnson, 
3. D. Swaim. 

Pledges were taken for the Orphanage. Amount of 
Pledges $598.75, an increase or $100.75 over last year. 

Moved and carried that a committee of three women be 
ippointed by the Moderator to carry into effect the recom- 
nendation in the Orphanage report providing two rooms 
n the Infirmary at a cost of $500. 00 each by the women 
)f the Liberty Association. 

S. D. Swaim reported on the order of exercises. 

Meeting adjourned to two o'clock p. m. 

Prayer by M. L. Kesler. 



8 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 

Two o'clock Association called to order by the Mode- 
rator. Prayer by H. Morton. 
Minutes read and approved. 

The committee to nominate the executive committee of 
Liberty Association submitted the following report and it 
was approved: 

R. S. Green, Jr., James Smith, C. M. Wall, R. K. Wil- 
liams and J. W. Noell. 

Committee: A. Johnson. Jeff. Lanning, and H. Sheets. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read as follows: 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The fields of operations by our Home Board are in our South- 
land, Cuba, Isle of Pines and Panama. Perhaps the board never 
faced more solemn responsibilities or greater opportunities than 
now. The industrial movements of our country are southward and 
westward. Great numbers of people of all nationalities are finding 
homes in the South and West and cities are being built at a rapid 
rate and our Home board is trying as far as possible to supply the 
needs of the situation, not only in the cities, but in the mountain 
sections. 

During the last year 865 workers were employed and 18,798 bap- 
tisms were reported and 271 churches were organized. 

The board received $231,834.03 last year, an increase of $55,422.- 
80 over the previous year. 

The convention in Richmond last May decided to make a great 
increase in contributions to Home Missions and this year we are 
working on a basis of $500,000. 

The Evangelistic Department of our Home Board work is encour- 
aging and stimulating the gifts and spirit of Miss Sims and let us 
pray for our evangelists. 

J. D. NEWTON, Committee. 

The report on State Missions was read as follows: 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The parting words of Christ, "Go into all the world and preach 
the gospel to every creature," rings out clear and unmistakable to 
God's dear children. The importance of Foreign Mission work is 
measured only by the value of the soul. Jesus, knowing the worth 
of the soul, asked, "What shall a man give in exchange for his 
soul?" Could we but realize that all heaven is so much interested 
we certainly would strive to inform ourselves as to the require- 
ments of the gospel and the needs of lost men, and give ourselves 
wholly to them. 

The spirit of missions has grown of late years among our people 
as never before. Many churches in our Southland, as well as else- 
where, are rising high above anything hitherto known. This is as 
it should be. But has the Liberty Association moved forward as 
she should have done? There has been gratifying advancement 
amongst some of our churches, but some of them lack interest in 
this important work, but every one might go forward beyond any- 
thing yet done. 

It is recommended that the pastors of this Association visit the 
churches with the pastors, during the coming winter, and discuss 
the subject of missions before our people till all our people will 



have been thoroughly aroused to the fact that thousands of our 
race are dying daily without hope of eternal life and that it is not 
only a duty but a privilege to aid in carrying out the command of 
Christ. 

HENRY SHEETS, Committee. 

These reports were discussed by 0. L. Powers, D. B. 
Rickard, S. D. Swaim, H. Sheets, S. F. Conrad, A. John- 
son, J. W. Noell, G. P. Harrill. 

Pledges for these two objects were taken. Amount of 
Home Mission Pledges, $205.00, and increase of $51.00 
over last year. Amount of Foreign Mission Pledges, 
$427.00, an increase of $20.25 over last year. 

Report of the Woman's Missionary Societies and Sun- 
beam Societies, was read as follows: 

There were six of these societies last year— a Womans Missionary Society, also a 
Sunbeam Band at Lexington, Thomasville and Wallburg. Each, as the report shows, 
are doing a fine work. Recently two more Missionary Societies have been added to the 
number, J ersey and Denton. 

SOCIETIES IN LEXINGTON CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 35. Mrs. S. L. Owen, Lexing- 
ton, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTION. 



State Missions $13.50 

Home Missions 12.00 

Foreign Missions 35.75 

Margaret Home 1.00 

Expense Fund 1.85 



Total for Missions $64.10 

Carpet . . . 45.00 

Cleaning Church 3.10 

For Bible 10.00 



Total given $122.20 

SUNBEAMS (LEXINGTON.) 

Number of members — 20. 

Contributions. 

State Missions $2 35 

Home Missions .. 2.25 

Foreign Missions 15.09 

Total for Missions $19.69 

Orphanage . . 12.00 

Total given $31.69 

Also sent a gift to China. 

Societies in Thomasville Church. 

The society has a membership of 22. Mrs. J. P. Harrel, Thomas- 
ville, N. C, is President. 

Contributions. 



State Missions 
Home Missions 



$27.74 
41.60 



Foreign Missions . . . 46.80 

Other objects . . . . 9.60 

Total . . $125.74 

Sunbeams. 

Miss Janie Williams is President. The society has a membership 
of 20. 

Contributions. 



State Missions . .... $5.00 

Home Missions 6.16 

Foreign Missions 12.68 



Total for Missions $23.84 



Societies in Waflburg Church. 

Mrs. C. M. Wall, Wallburg, N. C, is President. The society h 
a membership of 14. 

Contributions. 



State Missions $19.50 

Expense Fund .. .80 

Home Missions 3.80 

Self Denial 8.55 

Foreign Missions * . . ! . . . 20.00 

Christmas Offering 8.22 



Total .. $60.87 



Sunbeams. 

Miss Louise Turnley, Wallburg, N. C, is President. The society 
has a membership of 56. 

Contributions. 



State Missions . . . . . . . $ 3.00 

Home Missions .. .'. .. .. .. .. 2.90 

Foreign Missions . . . 5.00 

Money in Treasury 47 



Total . . . . . . . . . . $H.37 



Society in Jersey Church. 

Mrs. J. D. Palmer, Linwood, N. C, is President. It has a mem- 
bership of 16. Was organized June 16, 1907. 

Society in Denton Church. 

Mrs. Thomas Tysinger is President. The society has a member- 
ship of 12. Was organized June 30, 1907. 

The report was discussed by S. H. Averitt, S. D. Swaim, 
H. Sheets, and R. S. Green, Jr. 
The report was adopted. 

The report of the Executive Board was read and adopted: 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 

The board has aided five churches during the past year in th<| 
following amounts: 



11 



. Thomasville, $150.00, Rev. G. P. Harrell, pastor. 

Asheboro, $100.00, and Gravel Hill, $50.00, Rev. Henry Sheets, 
pastor. 

Stoner's Grove and Taylor's Grove, $50.00, Rev. Jefferson Lan 
ning, pastor. 

All the churches are doing good work, are waking up to their 
duty, and are steadily growing; and it is hoped that these places 
will soon become selfsustaining. As proof of the good work done 
at these places the reader is referred to the statistics in minutes. 
Respectfully submitted 

R. S. GREEN, Jr. 

Chairman. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUG. 21. 

The Association was called to order at eight o'clock by 
the Moderator. Prayer by G. P. Harrill. 

The following Committees for the next session were ap- 
pointed: 

State Missions: H. Sheets and W. B. Thompson. 

Home Missions: R. S. Green, Jr., P. M. Snider. 

Foreign Missions: G. P. Harrill, R. K. Williams. 

Periodicals: G. W. Wall, B. R. Cross. 

Education: A. Johnson, P. S. Vann. 

Orphanage: S. H. Averitt, T. H. Small. 

Sunday School: S. D. Swaim, S. A. Hege. 

Ministerial Relief: Jeff. Lanning, Ed. Myers. 

Temperance: H. Morton, D. H. Hepler. 

Obituaries: J. D. Walser, J. D. Newton. 

Woman's Work: M. L. Kesler, William Bowers. 

The following committee was appointed to name the 
trustees of Liberty Institute: S. H. Averitt, H. Sheets 
and G. P. Harrill. 

On motion of A. Johnson the regular order of business 
was suspended to decide the place of meeting for the next 
session of the Association. 

The church at Denton and the church at Liberty both 
urged the Association to meet with them in 1908. , 

After a very pleasant and gratifying discussion the As- 
sociation voted to hold its next session with the church at 
Denton.. 

The following is the report on Ministerial Education: 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

We sincerely regret to see any disposition on the part of our 
churches to discourage or neglect one of the two primary objects 
of the organization of the Baptist State Convention, namely: the 
education of our young men who feel called of God to preach the 
Gospel of His Son. The convention was never more divinely guided 
than when it undertook to supply the denomination and the King- 
dom with a well-trained ministry. It has never made a more justi- 
fiable or a better paying investment of the Lord's money. An edu- 
cated ministry means an educated people in every department of 



12 



the Lord's work. It seems to be a law of divine economy that poor 
young men shall compose the rank and file of the ministerial forces. 
But for the great work of this board during these seventy years we 
would not be able to say, as we are v today, that North Carolina 
preachers stand in the front ranks in the ministry of the word the 
world over. They are in great demand everywhere, whether at 
heme or in the foreign field. This work of educating young preach- 
ers is not done for their own sakes, but for Christ's sake and for 
the sake of the denomination to which they belong. They belong 
not to themselves in the same sense that other young men do but 
to the denomination as a divine heritage. And the denomination 
is wise if it makes the most of them. As to the field in which 
they are to labor leave this to Him who said, "Go ye into all the i 
world." Respectfully submitted, 

S. D. SWAIN. 

Ministerial Education was discussed by S. F. Conrad. 
The pledges for Ministerial Education were taken 
amounting to $90.50, an increase of $10.50 over last year. 
The report on Liberty Institute was read as follows: 

LIBERTY INSTITUTE REPORT. 

The work that should most interest this Association is the sup- 
port and building up of our own Liberty Institute; the patronage 
of Wake Forest, the University for Women, Chowan Baptist 
Female Institute, Oxford Female Seminary almost wholly depends 
upon patronage from our Baptist High Schools. Our pastors de- j 
pend upon them, our Sunday Schools depend upon them, the san- i 
city of our homes depend upon them, the everlasting principles of j 
our faith once delivered to the saints demand that we establish 
these schools, put them upon a firm basis, and insist that our Bap- 
tist parents especially educate their children in our schools. 

The report was discussed by P. S. Vann, B. W. Parham j 
and J. M. Burton. 

A. Johnson moved to amend the report by appointing a j 
committee of three to confer with the committee from the 
Piedmont Association to consider accepting Liberty Insti- 
tute and assuming the responsibility of the school. 

Motion carried. 

Adjourned. 

THURSDAY MORNING, AUG. 22.-9:30 O'CLOCK. 

Devotional exercises conducted by W. H. Davis. 
Report on Minister's Relief was read as follows: 

REPORT ON MINISTER'S RELIEF. 

The service already rendered by this board has abundantly dem- 
onstrated its right to a prominent place among the other objects of 
our benevolence. The old adage that what is everybody's business 
is nobody's business applies with equal force in providing for our 
aged and infirm, and worn-out preachers. Up to the time of the 
organization of this board many of us can testify with sad reflec- ; 
tions that these old worthies have been badly neglected. But since 'j 
the work was taken in hand, organized and placed on a systemetic 



13 



basis much has been done to supply this greatly needed and much 
deserved assistance. 

The board is now caring for 28 or 30 of these fathers in Israel. 
This is a pathetic call. Let us take heed. 

S. D. SWAIM. 

The report was discussed by S. D. Swaim, S. H. Averitt 
Adopted. 

A. Johnson introduced the following resolution; 

A. JOHNSON'S RESOLUTION. 

Resolved, that this association, realizing the enlarging needs of 
the Liberty Institute, adopt the Institution as one of the objects of 
its benevolence and the clerk is hereby directed to prepare a col- 
umn in the financial table of the minutes for contribution from 
the church and thai the committee appointed by the Moderator con- 
fer with the Piedmont Association and make such arrangement 
with regard to the property as the good of the Institution may de- 
mand. 

The resolution was discussed by A. Johnson, C. M. Wall, 
H. Morton. G. P. Harrill, B. W. Parham, J. M. Burton, H. 
Sheets, S. D. Swaim, J. W. Noell. 

The resolution was adopted unanimously with one excep- 
tion. 

The report on Sunday Schools was read as follows: 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Your committee on Sunday Schools submit the following re- 
port. 

We regard the Sunday School as an efficient arm in the work of 
the church, and believe that the progress of the church is largely 
advanced through the labors of a live Sunday School. 

We rejoice in the large success which under God has attended 
this important institution. 

JEFF LANNING. 

The report was discussed by Jeff Lanning, W. H. Davis. 

The report was adopted. 

The report on Obituaries was read as follows: 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 

The committee on Obituaries report that the following brethren 
have been called from their labors on earth to their rest and re- 
ward in heaven during the Associational year: 

Elder A. P. Stoker died in his 84th year, Bro. Stoker entered the 
ministery when a young man in his native county, Stanley, but 
afterwards moved to Montgomery county where he served a group 
of churches as pastor and labored at mission points until he moved 
to Davidson county, near Denton, where he spent the remainder of 
life in the same work. Full of years and good works the Master 
called him to his reward. 

His wife was Rebecca, daughter of Elder Bennie Carroll, and 
truly may it be said she proved to be a help-mate indeed. The 
Lord had called her to rest just a few months before her husband. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord. 

Bro. C. W. Davis, a devoted member of Abbotts Creek church, 



V 



14 



who spent a useful, gentle and sweet-spirited life in teaching the 
youths of our churches vocal and instrumental music, came to a 
peaceful end in the early part of this year and truly can we say 
his works do follow him. 

Bro. Joseph Welborn, deacon of Oak Hill church, was called away 
in the 68th year of his age. He signified his consciousness before 
his death of being near the "chilly waters" then peacefully passed 
over to the land of Spirits. 

Bro. Andrew W. Hine, a faithful and devoted member of Wall- 
burg church, died in his 68th year. The end came peacefully and 
with complete resignation. 

These, with twenty others, have been reported through the let- 
ters of the association, have been called by the Master from con- 
quest to victory, but their places are filled by others and the work 
goes on. 

"The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away. Blessed be the 
name of the Lord." 

H. MORTON. 

The report was adopted without discussion. 
The following is the 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

The Liberty Association would place on record its uncompromis- 
ing advocacy of the cause of prohibition and its high hope that 
within the next two years the whiskey traffic shall be banished 
from our State. In the meantime we would pledge our hearty sup- 
port to the enforcement of our present laws, for the regulation and 
control and curtailment of the liquor business. 

A. JOHNSON. 

This report was adopted without discussion. 

The Association ordered five hundred copies of the min- 
utes printed and sent to the churches. 

C. M. Wall was elected to represent this Association on 
the State Mission Board. 

Tne committee to have the History of Liberty Associa- 
tion printed was continued. 

The committee appointed the following 

TRUSTEES OF LIBERTY INSTITUTE. 

J. W. Noell, Chairman; A. Johnson, Secretary; C. M. 
Wall, Z. T. Sharpe, P. M. Snider, G. W. Wall 

The following is the 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Receipts. 



For State Missions $134.93 

For Home Missions 74.15 

For Foreign Missions '. . . 146.13 

For Sunday School Missions 3.05 

For Education 71.39 



15 



For Ministerial Relief 30.67 

For Minute Fund 29.83 



Total $490.15 

Disbursements. 

For State Missions $134.93 

For Home Missions 74.15 

For Foreign Missions 146.13 

For Sunday School Missions . 3.05 

For Education 71.39 

For Ministerial Relief 30.67 

For Minute Fund 29.83 



Total . $490.15 



S. H. AVERITT, Treasurer: 

The fellowing were nominated delegates to the Eaptist 
State Convention: G. P. Harrill and G. W. Wall. 

The following were nominoted delegates to the South- 
ern Baptist Convention- J. W. Noell, alternate, G. P. 
Harrill. 



16 



TABLE OF PLEDGES OF 1907-1908. 



OXl U L\ \j 1_1 l_j O 


STATE MISSIONS 


HOME MISSIONS 


FOREIGN MISSIONS 


ORPHANAGE 


EDUCATION 


MINISTERIAL 
RFLIEF 


LIBERTY 
INSTITUTE 


TOTALS 


Abbott's Creek 


15 00 


5 50 
5 00 


12 50 
8 00 


25 no 5 oo 


4 50 
1 oo 




67 5o 
4o oo 
1 5o 
44 oo 
36 oo 
8o 5o 
6 5o 
9 oo 
96 oo 
32o oo 


A sbeboro 


15 00 


10 OO 


1 oo 




Center Cross 


1 50 
8 00 
8 00 
20 00 

1 50 

2 00 
25 00 
60 00 

5 00 
10 00 


Denton 


4 00 
4 50- 
7 00 
1 00 


8 00 
8 50 
20 00 
1 00 


17 5o 
lo oo 
25 oo 
2 oo 
6 oo 
25 oo 
loo oo 
lo oo 
17 oo 


3 oo 
2 5o 
5 oo 


4 oo 




Gravel Hill 


3 oo 
3 5o 
1 oo 
1 oo 
3 oo 




Holloway's 




iiuiditn 




Jackson's Creek 






Jersey 


10 00 

35 00 
5 00 
4 50 


25 00 
100 00 
12 00 
15 00 


8 oo 
15 oo 
3 oo 
3 oo 




Lexington 


lo oo 




Liberty... 


2 oo 
4 oo 




37 oo 
53 5o 
1 5o 


Lick Creek 




Maple Springs 


1 50 


















Mount Lebanon 


2 50 
10 00 


i oa 

6 00 


3 00 
10 00 


3 oo 
25 oo 

2 oo 
60 oo 
25 oo 
25 oo 
11 oo 
9 oo 
2 25 

4 oo 
25 oo 
6o oo 


1 oo 
3 oo 

2 oo 
12 oo 

5 oo 

3 oo 

4 oo 
2 oo 


1 oo 
1 5o 




11 5o 
55 5o 

7 oo 
2oo oo 

95 oo 
81 oo 
46 oo 
28 oo 

8 25 
*1 5o 

128 oo 
213 oo 


New Friendship 




Oak Hill 


2 00 
52 00 


1 oo 
6 oo 
5 oo 
3 5o 

2 5o 
2 oo 




Orphanage 


30 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
4 50 
1 00 


40 00 
25 00 
25 00 
10 00 
5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
40 00 
55 00 




Pine Meeting House 


25 00 
15 00 
12 50 
5 50 

2 00 

3 50 
30 00 
55 00 




Reed's Gross Roads 




Rich Fork 




Stoner's Grove 




Summerville 


1 oo 
1 oo 




Taylor's Grove 


1 oo 
5 oo 
7 «0 




Thomasville 


25 00 
30 00 


3 oo 
6 oo 




Wallburg 




TOTALS 


387 50 


205 00 


42700 


463 75 


90 50 


70 50 




167475 









sasuadxg iooips 



'looqog 
uiojj suisi^deg "ON 



00 to . O : lo o 
i~h CM : CM : CM ^ 
CM 



(NOIOCCO 
05 10WIC 
CO 



uadQ s^uop\[ 



uaspjj, 
s-taded pue s^i-ia^renft 



iSjBaqiq; ui saum[o a. "o^ 



(M (M (N (M 



CM 00 © CD O 



O O LO LO CO 
>0 <M Oi CD t- 
CO t-H 



moo 
lo t- © 

CM 



00 H LO O 

CO i— I 



saaipuaj, pun sjaoijjo 



CO 00 LO CD 



Q 

< H 

CO o 

H £ 

^ 

H H 

g O 
O Ph 
H 

CO 



zn m 

§2 




cd 



0) 

bo 
o3 
CD 



o 
co 

o >>ffi 

£~ * 
Q ~> 

0) S . 

CQ o3 S 
f > *+- ) T3 



03 

> BC0~ 
O O •■<-' 

® S3 is 



cd o lo o cm 

t- OS T* OS CM 
CM 



cm 00 c- o> 



CD 



X) o ^ ^ 

O ojO M 

85.38 

.3 3© b 



r d 'Si. 
8 o 55 W a> 
£ tag h-S 

a W S <y b 

^ H , „ ~ 

2 - ^ ^ " fe 
£=3 <d £ 

l-S >-5 1-9 Ph >-S 



s 

CO 

£ 

Eg 

co^ 

^**H 

1-8 



i2 -03 

O 



£ S x ^ j 

cH w SO 

O . • tffl . 

OJ<IOb 



J as he 
5 On 

CQ ^ 



03 

B 

CD 03 
CD U 



1 8 § 

03 U 4j 

g ^ OJO 
O.B.B CD 

u z B 
co'dcqS O 



ca 

5h CD 
© P3 

5 ffl m 

5 03 B 

6 IS 

©Eh£ 
o3 ^ 
-B cc 

°2§ 



COj> 



CD 

CD 



^3 02 



a 



bJO 



<D 



5 ^ 

B B 



8 w 



bo aj 
B * 
CD -S o 

Ifsa Sf|6|"S 

- is »(2-™ 



CD 

O i^h 2 CD 

pil 



QOffiW^^J^^SS^ZOOPHpiS^cOcoHEH^ 



diqsj8qui9j\[ 



^HHO^H : Ci 00 LD LO CO 
rH rH CM HNHH 



«£> CO CO CT5 H< r-J 00 :<3WtN 
CO CO CM t- t-H t- IHt-Q! 
rH COHHH ! 



O 
<J5 



GO 

o 
o 

!-H 

EH 
< 

r-H 

o 
o 

m 
m 
< 

H 

« 

fa 
pq 



fa 
o 

fa 
pq 
H 

<J 

O 
i— i 

H 

GO 

h— I 

H 
<J 
H 
GO 



CO OJ CO rH CO CO : OS C\] CO ?£> rH CO iOCOOO'^^'^rH ; C- a , 
iO WHt> : CO CO O LO lO irHiOrH^CDCTiCOCO : COW 



^SO^J 



: ; : : CO ; 


: co ; 




: 1—1 i 



UIB*) 



papnpxg 



suispdteg 



M o 
i-l O 



CO O CO CO CO CO 



CO : i-l 



00 CO rH ^ 



?D CO ; t> CO 10 







: : : rj< ; 




: : <D : : 
: : u i " 


MM! 


& 2 


: : o : : 
: +s : . 


: i i <l>^-i 

1*5 cSS 



£ O O 

r-H CP O 

CO yn fn 

CD - CD 



CD CD ?H 

PS § 



CD 

dd£ ji^'m 



.s.s s £ 

~ CD „ . - ^ 

cd-m^ 



O t— I CO 00 rH 



rG 

m r-i O 

rC 0) CD 

CD CD H 



S ° 
> 

CO 



mi 

-C •> CD 2 •£ 

CD ^ 0T,_r rH*" 
CD 

O CD ^5 j2 



m g £ <i H O 



o 

£6 



bo 



ft 

^ 



bJO on 
.a o 



> w 



CD 2 



> 

OS 



§1' 



O <N 00 tJ< 00 <5S : t- C© CM t> CM 



05 CO CM CO C- tH 

o cm o> io co 

CM "tf CM rH CM 



lO ^ O CO CO 
CO rj< t> 



O lO 1/5 00 OS cO lO 
t> rj< 00 00 Oi ^ 



CM CM (NHH 



CO CM 

ioooo 



888 

>C CO CO 



saip.mi{3 pun saSanoQ 



OlOOI>tO«£i 
lO t~ LO CM <M 



suoissij\[ uSiaao^ 



SUOISSIJ^ 31U0JJ 



suoissij\[ 



sasuadxg 
looips ^ptms 



s[B^uappui 



O CO 



Suuisda^j 
puB Suipjmg 



8 



r-l O CO CM CM 
NHHH 

CM 



rH O O 
HH«D 



O CO 
^ CO 
CM 



CO Tj* Tt* CM rH 



QOCOOOOU5 



§: 



O O O id o 
MWOt-O 
rH CM rH 



Q 02 1 

° p 

03 Oi 

< ? 



5 



o 



ot S c 

" 03 



£ B 



951 b 3 * 

03 o3.£ 

o^tn b * | 

goi mfcCOQ 

;B- ® <!>,_; • 



CP 

B3 B 

8§ 

£•£ 



J02 



0) 



• r* 03 

8 Iff 

cuffi 
S02^ 

W'pdd 



IS C B-r< 

»2 o © > 

03 bf) bX) ^3 O 

S.S.S £ "S 
2 x x o © 

« £ £ * B 

Ko:02W « 
q Q Ph ^ 

doioid^, 



2^ 

© ^ 



03 
O i 



Oi 



rS 
B B 

o3.£ 

A CS 53 



1-9 

1 = 
Mas 

.s § 

4-> C 



o'SBBo3 , ft-So 



> 
<y o 

pi 

s ax: 

02HH 



I 




MINUTES 



OF THE 



Seventy-Fifth Annual Session 

( Seventy-Fifth Anniversary ) 



OF j 



lliiiillitell 



HELD WITH 



DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 18, 19, 20, 1908 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Seventy-Fifth Annual Session 

(Seventy-Fifth Anniversary) 

OF 




HELD WITH 

DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 18, 19, 20, 1908 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator: J. W. Noell, Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk: P. S. Vannn, Lexington, N, C. 

Treasurer: S. H. Averitt, Thomasville, N. C. 



PLACE. TIME, AND PREACHER OF INTKODUCTOKY 
SERMON FOR THE SESSION AUGUST J909 

The next session will be held with the Liberty church Thurs- 
day after the third Sunday in August, 1909. Elder ' Joseph T. 
Watts to preach the sermon; Elder T. S. Crutchfield, Alternate. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSO- 
CIATION, AUGUST-1908. 



W. S. Adderton Denton, N. C. 

Lee Carrick Linwood, N. C. 

T. S. Crutchfield . . . . % . . . . . ..... Thomasville, N. C. 

M.'L. fcesler :". .. . . .. .. . . . . Thomasville, N. C. 

M. J. Leach . . . . .. . - . . . . . . Lassiter, N. C. 

H. Morton . r # : . ; . . ...... . . . . Thom,asville, N. C. 

C J. D. Newton . i \ , * T . . ' ... . _ . . Thomasville, N. C. 

Henry Sheets ... . . . . . . . Lexington, N. C. 

S. D. Swaim .... ...... . . Lexington, N. C. 

Joseph T. Watts . : Lexington, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

R. S. GREEN, C. M. VtMu, \ i ft. K. WILLIAMS, 

J. W. NOELL, A. JOHNSON, T. S. CRUTCHFIELD, 



HENRY SHEETS JOSEPH T. WATTS P. S. VANN. 



Proceedings. 



- Denton, N. C, 
August 18, 1908. 

The seventy-fifth annual session of the Liberty . Baptist 
Association met in, the meeting house of the Denton Baptist 
church on August 18, 1908. At 11:50 o'clock^ in ; the morn- 
ing the 1 introductory sermon was preached' By Ke'v. M. L. 
Kesler. His text was Acts 20:35. : v i 

m : Intermission for dinner one and one-half hours. 



At 2:30 o'clock the Moderator Called the Association to 
order. Prayer was offered by Henry Sheets., 

A motion was made : to dispense with the reading of 
the letters from the churches composing the Association. 
The motion was lost. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee on 
'order of business for the session : A. Johnson, W. B. 
Thompson, and C. H. Teague. , . , 

S. H. Averitt and R. S. Green, Jr., were appointed to 
read the letters from the churches to the Association. 

The delegates from the churches were as follows: 

Abbotts Creek — C. H. Teague, Lee Roy Hayworth. 

Asheboro— S. R. Styers. 
. Center Cross — • 

Center Hill— A. V. Miller, E. D. Jarrett. f , ; 



G MINUTES OF THE 

Denton — Robt. Tysinger, J. A. Snider, W. B. Russell. 
Gravel Hill— J. C. Loftin, T. H. Davis, W. A. Russell. 
Hollowavs — D. H. Cross, J. F. Carrick. 
Huldah— 
Jackson's Creek — 

Jersey — Z. T. Sharpe, W. C. Roach, J. D. Palmer. 

Lexington— G. W. Miller, Jas. Smith, Robt. Miller. 

Liberty— H. P. May, E. L. Hepler. 

Lick Creek— W. A. Reid, P. M. Snider, J. E. Skeen. 

Maple Springs — 

Marion — 

Mt. Lebanon — M. J. Leach. 

New Friendship — A. P. Snider, H. F. Motsinger, S. A. 
Hege. 

Oak Hill- 
Orphanage — S. H. Averitt, J. F. Clinard. 
Piney Baptist — Gray Sowers, L. F. Barnes, A. R. Wil- 
liams. 

Reeds Cross Roads — B. 0. Myers, J. W. Cole. 
Rich Fork— 

Stoner's Grove — D. D. Davis, Lee Roach, 0. L. Stoner, 
J. D. Lookabill, L. C. Lomax, B. F. Roach. 

Summerville — Edw. Bean, C. B. Wall, Jason Buie. 

Taylor's Grove — Ira Bailey, A. H. Michael. 

Thomasville — A. Johnson, R. S. Green, Jr., J. T. Valen- 
tine. 

Wallburg— E. E. Jenkins, C. M. Wall, E. O. Wall. 

The following officers of the Association were elected: 
J. W. Noell, Moderator, Lexington, N. C. 

P. S. Vann, Clerk, Lexington, N. C. 

S. H. Averitt, Treasurer, Thomasville, N. C. 

The Moderator appointed Thos. Carrick, Henry Sheets 
and H. Morton, committee on credentials. 

The committee on order of business reported as fol- 
lows: Tuesday 3:30 p. m., Orphanage. Periodicals 4:30 P. 
M., 8 :30 P. M. Education. 

Wednesday: Devotional Exercises 9:45 A. M. ; Liberty- 
Piedmont Institute 10:00 A. M. ; State Missions 11 :00 A. M. ; 
Foreign Missions 2:30 P. M. ; Woman's Work 3 :30 P. M. 

The following visiting brethren were welcomed: J. F. 
Hodge, of Stanly Association, Pres. W. L. Poteat, Wake 
Forest College, O. A. Keller, Beulah Association. 

R. L. Wall and 0. L. Stoner were app Dinted finance 
committee. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 



The committee on credentials recommended the receiv- 
ing of Center Hill church into the Association. The Associa- 
tion gladly received this newly constituted church as a mem- 
ber of its body. 

It was ordered to discuss our Orphanage. The report 
was to be read on the following day. 

The Orphanage was discussed by : S..-H. Averitt, Thorn-, 
as Carrick, M. L. Kesler, and Archibald Johnson. 

It was moved and carried to adjourn and discuss Peri- 
odicals for thirty minutes to-night. • 1 ; ;° 

Prayer by J. T. Watts. V 1 : 



The Association was called to order by the Moderator 
at eight o'clock P. M. Prayer. by T. S. Crutchfield. V 

Archibald Johnson read 

THE REPORT ON PERIODICALS. \ J: 

The Biblical Recorder is essential to the proper devel- 
ment of North Carolina Baptists. "We may do without it, 
but we can not do so well. It is the bond that binds us 
to the work, and to each other. It promotes the general 
harmony and fills us with enthusiasm. For almost three 
quarters of a century the Recorder has stood on the watch 
tower and never yet sounded a false note. We. urge upon 
our entire membership, the vital importance of 'reading, o$ir* 
great organ which is under superb management and was 
never more efficient than it is to-day. 

We also commend Charity and Children and our mis- 
sion journals published in Atlanta and Richmond. 

The report was discussed by: O. L. Keller, A. Johnson, 
H. Sheets, S. H. Averitt, and S. D. Swaim. 

The report was adopted. 



Archibald Johnson read 

THE REPORT ON EDUCATION. 
We learn with great pleasure of the bright prospects 
before our institutions of learning in North Carolina. Wake 
Forest College was never more efficient, or worthier- of the 
favor and patronage of our people. The Baptist Universi- 
ty for women is more than fulfilling the biggest expecta- 
tions of its friends, and it is rapidly widening and deepening 
its influence. We commend it unreservedly to our people 
as one of the best and most thorough schools in all the 
Southland. 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



We hear with gratification also of the excellent condi- 
tion of the other schools for women that are doing so much 
for the uplift of our North Carolina womanhood. 

But great as are the claims of our colleges upon us our 
chief interest centers about our High Schools throughout 
the State. These schools are feeders for the colleges and 
the prosperity of the latter depends upon the development 
of the former. 

A determined purpose on the part of the State to put 
our High Schools out of business must be apparent to all. 
State High Schools are being established in close competi- 
tion with these denominational institutions that have been 
built with so great sacrifice; and in some cases they have 
overwhelmed our academies and taken the field for them- 
selves. 

As a denomination we are not yet ready to surrender 
to the State. Our own schools furnish what a state school 
can never offer, namely, the Baptist spirit, and this to 
loyal Baptists is beyond price. Not all our schools will 
survive the onslaught, but a few of them will and around * 
these permanent institutions our interest and sympathy 
must gather. The Liberty-Piedmont Institute can be and 
must be made one of these permanent schools. It has a dis- 
tinct field, a noble location and a loyal constituency. We 
must rally to its standard and place it on a solid basis. 
Once more we are face to face with the time worn problem : 
Shall the denomination or the State educate our children 
Let us give the right answer to that question here and now. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 

P. S. VANN. 

Pres. W. L. Poteat discussed this report. 
Prayer by Thomas Carrick. 
Adjourned. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1908. 
The Association was called to order by the Moderator 

at ten o'clock in the morning. 

Prayer was offered by H. Morton. 

The minutes were read and approved. 

It was moved and carried to appoint a committee to 
draw up recommendations in regard to the four churches 
of our Association, which have not reported to the body 
within several years. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



Henry Sheets, Thomas Carrick and Archibald Johnson 
were appointed on this committee to report at this session. 

Our Liberty-Piedmont Institute was discussed by : Archi- 
bald Johnson, H. W. Early, M. L. Kesler, J. T. Watts, Thorn 
as Carrick, and S. D. Swaim. 

Pledges were taken for Liberty-Piedmont Institute and 
the following churches took stock as follows: 

Lexington $100, Orphanage $100, Thomasville $100 
Wallburg, $200, Jersey $100. 

The amount that each church took is to be paid within 
the next four years, paying $25.00 per year, until the share 
is paid. This amount is to bear 6 per cent, interest, payable 
in tuition at Liberty-Piedmont Institute. 

The report on education was adopted. 



The following committees were appointed to report at 
this session : 

Place and preacher: C. W* Miller, S. H. Averitt and 

C. H. Teague. 

To nominate the executive board: Henry Sheets, J. T. 
Watts and J. W. Cole. 

To nominate trustees of Liberty-Piedmont Institute: S. 

D. Swaim, P. S. Vann and H. Morton. 

The following committees were appointed to report at 
our next session. 

State Missions — Thomas Carrick. C. M. Wall. 

Home Missions— T. S. Crutchfield, J. T. Valentine. 

Foreign Missions — S. D. Swaim, Ed. Myers. 

Periodicals — M. L. Kesler, Wm. Bowers. 

Education— H. W. Early, M. V. Williams. . 

Orphanage — Henry Sheets, O. L. Stoner. 

Sunday Schools— J. T. Watts, P. M. Snider. 

Ministerial Relief — A Johnson. R. S. Green. 

Temperance — G. W. Wall, J. D. Newton. 

Obituaries — Jas. Smith, S. L. Owen. 

Woman's Work — S. H. Averitt, S. A. Hege. 

Ministerial Education — G. F. Hankins, Cleveland My- 
ers. 

The committee on the printing of The History of Liber- 
ty Association reported. 

It was moved and carried that the committee on the 
sale of the History apportion out the copies to the different 
pastors of the Association sufficient to pay off the debt, and 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



that the pastors sell these books and report to the commit- 
tee as soon as possible. 

The committee on the programme for this session re- 
ported as follows : 

Wednesday 8:00 o'clock P. M.,, Schools, Thursday 39 -.45 
A. M., Devotional Exercises; 10:00 A. M., Home Missions, 
11:30 A. M., Obituaries v 12 M., Miscellaneous business:- 

Prayer by M. L. Kesler. ' • , 

Adjourned. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AUGUST, 19. 

Called to order by the Moderator, at 2:30 o'clock. Pray- 
er by Thomas Carrick. 

The committee on time and place reported that .they 
were unable to report the place of the next meeting, because 
so many churches were calling for the Association to. meet 
with them. k 

The body then discussed the question as to where the 
next session should convene. 

The Association voted to hold its next session with Lib- 
erty church. Abbotts; Creek and Lexington made earnest ap- 
peals for the Association to meet with them. 

Place of meeting.: Liberty church. 

Time of meeting, Thursday after the third Sunday . in 

AUgUSt. ' V V ♦.. ..rw. ' U ' . ;\ ' . 

To preach the introductorv sermon, J. T. Watts; Alter- 
nate, T. S. Crutchfield. . ' ,; . •"•/., . . : 

The Association, after due discussion as to time of .-meet- 
ing, voted to change .the time of meeting from Tuesday to 
Thursday. 

J. f. Watts read 

THE REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS ; • 

The last Convention year was one of great financial' 
stringency, due to the panic which swept the country. This 
condition made it impossible for us to reach the high stand- 
ard which was set up at Richmond in 1907. Great wisdom 
was exercised on the part of our Board in the making- of ap- 
propriations in order that the work might be carried on 
without' incurring a large debt. Great faith in God and the' 
people was exercised and the faith was rewarded, for on 
the last day of the Convention year, April 30th, $135,000 
was received, and that after 5 p. m. The year was closed 
without a deficit, $402,328 having been received. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



During the year 2,174 persons were received by. confes- 
sion of faith and baptism. According to the annual report 
of the Board ''Such results as these in the midst of super- 
stition and heathen idolatry ought to make all our hearts 
glad and beget within us a desire and purpose to do far 
more than ever in the past for winning souls." 

During the year 28 new missionaries were appointed 
and sent out, 11 old missionaries on furlough, were return- 
ed to their fields. 

There are now 128 schools connected with our missions 
and 3,194 scholars in attendance. Who can estimate the 
transforming power of the Christian schools? It can easily 
be seen that a large proportion of the converts of the fu- 
ture will come from these schools. 

North Carolina stands fourth, in the list of states in con- 
tributions to foreign missions, having given a total of $35,- 
540.97 for the year 1907-08, or a little more than 17 cents 
per member. If North Carolina Baptists would give 25 
cents per member, we would contribute during the present 
year $51,261.50. Would this be an impossibility? 

Our Corresponding Secretary made a trip during the 
last Convention year to all our fields. This trip of personal 
inspection and investigation has furnished him with fuller 
knowledge and stronger convictions as to the needs. The 
results of this visit will be seen in the increased work and 
contributions during the year 1908-09. 

One of the strongest factors of our work for foreign 
missions is the Educational Department, in charge of Dr. 
T. B. Ray. Missionary Classes to the number of 517 with a 
membership of 5,720 have been registered in the Secretary's 
office. As the people come to know more about missions 
they will give more liberally to the spread of the gospel and 
for this the Educational Department stands. With Brs. Wil- 
lingham. Porter, Smith and Ray, and efficient office as- 
sistants, we are equipped with the leadership of men burn- 
ing with holy zeal, founded upon the widest intelligence of 
the problem of world-wide evangelization. 

The Foreign Mission Journal has been enlarged and 
improved and should be in every Baptist home. Twenty- 
five cents per annum will place it there. 

We have only fairly begun our efforts to evangelize 
the world. We should make a substantial advance in our 
gifts to this cause every year. The watchword of every 



12 



MINUTES OF TrfE 



Christian should be, "Let us go forward." 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOS. T. WATTS. 



J T Watts read 

THE REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK: 

The women in many of our Associations have been slow 
to undertake special work among themselves, yet this work 
has been steadily making its way until the Association with- 
out an active organziation is the exception. The larger or- 
ganization is known as the Woman's Missionary Union, 
auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention: Each state 
has its Woman's Missionary Union, also auxiliary to its 
State Convention. The work in the state operates through 
three departments, the Woman's Missionary Society, the 
Young Ladies Auxiliary and the Sunbeam Society. 

The plan now is that the annual meeting of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Union be separated by time and place 
from the meeting of the Baptist State Convention. The 
last meeting was held at Gastonia March 24-26, 1908. Their 
principal object is not to raise money, yet $21,546.66 was 
reported at that meeting. Of this amount $2,413.28 was 
contributed by the Young Ladies' Auxiliary and the Sun- 
beams. They have planned to raise for next year, in round 
numbers, $27,000.00. This amount is distributed among 
the folloAving objects. Foreign Missions, Home Missions, 
State Missions. The Margaret Home for Missionaries and 
children at Greenville, S. .C, and the Training School at 
Louisville Ky., for the training of young women who are 
to do missionary work at home and on foreign fields. 

The great work done by our women is not to be seen 
in the sums of money raised, but in the splendid spirit of 
sympathy and enthusiasm for all missionary effort devel- 
oped in our churches. 

When our women take hold of this work a new inter- 
est springs up both in our homes and in our churches. They 
do not fail to contrive ways and means for gathering up 
the contributions. Missionary information is disseminated, 
the church is called to prayer for weeks together, and the 
great wide world of need and opportunity is laid upon the 
hearts of young and old alike. 

It is fitting that women do this. They have a patience 
and genius for looking after small collections; a faith in 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



the unseen, and sympathy for suffering and need beyond 
themselves, unknown to most business men. They are wil- 
ling to fling the coin out and hear no ringing of returns, 
satisfied with the nobler promptings of the heart rather 
than the reasonings of the head. 

Your committee urge that the pastors and the men in 
our churches encourage and assist the women in organizing 
missionary societies in every church in this Association, and 
that these societies be formed even though they are small. 

We would like to make special mention of several 
faithful women who have wrought so well that they have 
become an inspiration, but this would be unfair for there are 
others unknown to us who are equally worthy. But we do 
wish as an Association to place our warmest approval upon 
the noble work they are doing. 

Respectfully submitted, 
M. L. KESLER, for Committee. 

The report on Foreign Missions and the report on Wo- 
man's Work, were discussed together by J. T. Watts. 

Pledges were taken for Foreign Missions amounting to 
$446.25. 

It was moved and carried to instruct the clerk to record 
the pledges for this year the same as they were for last 
year, in the absence of the delegates. 

It was moved and carried to discuss the subjects of 
State Missions and Home Missions on to-morrow at 10:00 
o'clock A. M. 

S. H. Averitt read 

THE REPORT ON OUR ORPHANAGE. 

The past year has been in many respects the best in 
the history of the Institution. 375 children have been en- 
rolled with an average of 360 cared for. We have had very 
little sickness and only one death. Cleanliness, wholesome 
food and regular habits have had much to do with the 
splendid health record. 

The Noah Richardson Library and the new Infirmary 
(Woman's Building) which have been erected during the 
year add much to the general appearance of the grounds 
as well as to the actual value of the plant. Charity and 
Children reached the 14000 mark and turned into the Treas- 
ury a net profit of $1859.75. The Shoe Shop and Planing 
Mill^have also had a good year. The farm, in addition to 
making a handsome profit ($1242.49) has been greatly im- 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



proved and the growing crops promise a good yield. While 
the Printing Office, Shoe Shop, Machine Shop and Farm 
help in a financial way, the training given to the boys in 
these departments is the real consideration and we must 
ever look to the Baptists of North Carolina for our support. 
The number of children cared for will no doubt be great- 
er during the coming year than ever before and our ex- 
penses will necessarily be greater. In order to meet this 
extra expense we recommend the following : 

1st — That every Sunday School take a monthly col- 
lection for the Orphanage. 

2nd — That the Superintendents spare no reasonable ef- 
fort to have a club of Charity and Children placed in every 
Sunday School in the Liberty Association. 

3rd — That Thanksgiving Day be made Orphanage Day 
in all our churches. 

S. H. AVERETT, Committee. 

H. Morton read 

THE REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Just one year ago this Association went on record as 
true advocates of prohibition, but hardly did we anticipate 
such a grand victory so soon as was gained on May the 
26th when a majority of over 44,000 of the best people in 
the State have settled for all time that the making and sell- 
ing intoxicating drink shall be driven out of our State, but 
we cannot hope but what desperate efforts will be made 
to make the law ineffective and violators will be found on ev- 
ery hand, hence it behooves every lover of law, home, church 
and humanity to not only abide by the law himself, but to 
uphold the arm of the law and to see that law and good 
order is maintained in every community as far as in him 
lies. 

Let every one of us like Gideon's true men stand in his 
place, and heed the admonition of Paul. "Quit you like men, 
be strong." 

If we will do our duty in this great matter soon the 
gainsayer will be put to silence and it can no more be said 
that prohibtion does not prohibit. Furthermore let it be 
remembered that we before being allowed to cast our vote 
in any election that we were required to take a solemn oath 
that we would support the law T s and constitution of the 
State. 

Can any member of the church worthy of the name go 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



on with impunity and wink at crime and instead of aiding 
in support of law give his consent to violation. God ror- 
bid, if the religious forces of the State fail to uphold the 
law, how can we hope for moral reform. 

H. MORTON. 

The report was discussed by H. Morton. The report 
was adopted. 

S. H. Averitt, Treasurer of the Association, submitted 
the following: 

TREASURERS REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 

State Missions $139.41 

Foreign Missions 137.68 

Home Missions • • • • 101.38 

Education 73.70 

Minute Fund 30.50 

Aged Ministers' Relief 29.81 

Louisville Training School .... . . 11.01 



Total $523.49 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

State Missions $ 139.41 

Foreign Missions 137.68 

Home Missions 101.38 

Education 73.70 

Minute Fund 30.50 

Aged Ministers, Relief 29.81 

Louisville Training School 11.01 



Total $523.49 



S. H. AVERETT, Treasurer. 



Henry Sheets and Thomas Carrick presented the follow- 
ing report: 

Your committee in regard to the following churches 
Marion, Maple Springs, Center Cross, because of continued 
failure to represent themselves in our body, be and are here- 
by dropped from the list of churches in our body with this 
provision that they or either of them be reinstated if re- 
port e I Dext year. 

HENRY SHEETS, 
THOMAS CARRICK. 



/ 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



This resolution was discussed by: J. T. Watts, Henry 
The resolution was adopted. 
Adjourned. 
Sheets, R. S. Green, Jr. 

Prayer by J. T. Watts. 



THURSDAY A. M, AUGUST 20, 190S. 
The Association was called to order by the Moderator 
at 10:00 o'clock in the morning. Prayer was offered by J. 
W. Noell. 

Henry Sheets read the following : 

We recommend as the Executive Board for the ensuing 
year the following brethren : 

P. S. Vann, R. S. Green, C. M. Wall, R. K. Williams, 
GALLEY FOUR 

Archibald Johnson, J. W. Noell, T. S. Crutchfield, Henry 
Sheets, Joseph T. Watts. 

The report was adopted. .... 

The committee to nominate Trustees for Liberty-Pied- 
mont Institute reported as follows : 

We recommend that the old Board be appointed as fol- 
lows, J. W. Noell, Chairman ; A. Johnson, Secretary ; C. M. 
Wall, Z. T. Sharpe, P. M. Snider, and G. W. Wall. 

The report was adopted. 

T. S. Crutchfield read the 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

The progress which we have made in our denomina- 
tional work has not, and we judge will not, diminish the 
need for ministerial education. God continues to call poor 
young men to preach His word, and we believe He calls 
to the churches to help these young men to secure the need- 
ed education. 

We have the best of facilities for this at Wake Forest 
College and at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
in Louisville, Ky. 

There were 75 ministerial students at W. F. C. last year, 
60 of whom were aided by the Board and there were 30 
men from North Carolina in the Seminary, 20 of Whom 
received help from the Students Aid Fund there. Already 
25 have asked for help at W. F. next year. The Board of 
Education at W. F. C. was made the agent of the Aid Fund 
at the Seminary by an action of the B. S. Convention in 
session at Wilmington last year, so the two funds are to us 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 



now practically one. Our State did not contribute as much 
to the fund at the Seminary last year as it took to help our 
men who received aid from the Aid Fund. It will take 

some six thousand dollars to help the same number at 
F. C. that received aid there last year. This calls for in- 
creased contribution to this object on the part of North 
Carolina Baptists. We recommend an increase in the con- 
tribution of the churches in our Association to this object. 

T. S. CRUTCHFIBLD. 



S. D. Swaim read 
THE REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK. 

According to last year's statistics we had 2122 Sunday 
school pupils in 20 churches, six churches reporting no 
school at all. This sounds well to Baptist ears. But when 
we examine into the work being done in tire 'schools we 
realize that we have not yet ascended the ladder of Sunday 
school success very far. In other words great emphasis has 
been laid upon numerical strength while too little atten- 
tion has been paid to the internal development of our 
schools. It is one thing to have a mass meeting; it is quite 
another thing to have a well regulated, well graded, well 
developed, well taught Sunday school. 

The Sunday school is a department of the church ; dis- 
tinctively it is the teaching department of the church, in 
which old and young alike are afforded an opportunity and 
an inspiration to gain a systematic knowledge of the scrip- 
tures. North Carolina has produced some of the greatest 
Sunday school specialists in America. These men have giv- 
en an impetus to Sunday school work which has_ placed us 
at the head of the Sunday school procession. There is dan- 
ger lest we should gloat over our standing and that we 
should feel complacent over our present attainments. We 
must awake to the more difficult work of building the prop- 
er class rooms, furnishing modern equipment, training our 
teachers and accomplishing the real work of teaching. 

We are happy to note the appointment of Bro. Middle- 
ton as Sunday school Secretary of North Carolina. Our 
churches should keep in touch with him and secure his ser- 
vices for Institutes and Conventions whenever possible. Bro. 
J oseph T. Watts who was formerly Sunday school Secretary 
for Ky., has agreed to act as Secretary for Liberty Associa- 
tion, under the State S. S. committee and thus lend a help- 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



ing hand to the S. S. work in this Association whenever 
possible. 

We recommend the use of our S. S. Convention helps 
published at Nashville. We also commend the Biblical Re- 
corder for its active support of the S. S. work. We feel 
that the Recorder is doing a work of incalculable value m 
presenting such issues as that of last week. The weekly 
treatment of the S. S. lessons is most excellent. 

Submitted by Committee. 

This report was discussed by: Joseph T. Watts. 

The report was adopted. 



Henry Sheets read the 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 
Brethren of Liberty Association: 

Every phase of the Lord 's work, as fostered by our 
State Convention, should appeal to our hearts. State mis- 
sions, foreign missions, bur orphanage work, the caring for 
worn out and indigent ministers, the better education of 
our young men and women are all before us for careful con- 
sideration. But what relation does State missions sustain 
to each and all these objects? It is easily perceived that 
just in proportion as we advance in the work of State mis- 
sions, every other object is enlarged and strengthened. 

Why are we as a denomination doing so much more to 
day for all objects than we did ten, twenty or thirty years 
ago ? The whole story is told when we recount the arduous 
toils, wise planning and self-sacrificing spirit of the brethren 
composing our board; led by our overworked Secretaries, 
who have with careful eyes guarded well every interest of 
the denomination. 

All the objects of our convention are very important 
in their place and we need to foster them all, but in the 
nature of the case, State missions stands out before them 
all, going before, blazing the way and laying the foundation, 
by preaching in school-houses, under brush harbors, estab- 
lishing Sunday schools and ultimately constituting churches, 
which, in turn become feeders to the board, which aided 
them, when too too feeble to stand alone. 

In pushing State missions, we are carrying out what was 
commanded the Apostles, to begin at Jerusalem,, going to 
the uttermost parts of the earth. 

The urgent demands upon our board, which cannot be 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



met for the want of funds, suggests a larger liberality on 
the part of our churches. 

HENRY SHEETS, 
; 1 W. B. THOMPSON. 



R. S. Green read the 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The report of the corresponding secretary of the Home 
Mission Board to the last session of the Southern Baptist 
Convention is a very encouraging statement of the progress 
of Home Missions. The report shows 961 workers on the 
field, with 22.404 baptisms for the year, and 337 new churches 
constituted, and 338 church houses built and improved. And 
even with the financial panic upon us there was an increase 
of $33,501.56 in the total receipts of the Board over that of 
the preceding year. 

The conclusion to that report is so encouraging that we 
feel constrained to incorporate it as a part of our report to 
the Association. It is as follows: "The years work -has 
been glorious in achievements. More houses of worship have 
been erected through the Board's help than during any pre- 
vious year. The labors of our missionaries and evangelists 
have resulted in a larger number of conversions and bap- 
tisms than ever before. The growth of our mission churches 
in spirituality, liberality and aggressive work has been most 
gratifying. There is manifest everywhere a growing sense 
of unity in all denominational activity. Our people are more 
than ever sensible of their oneness and alive to the momen- 
tous importance of seizing the opportunities which confront 
us in the South. The necessity of planting and training at 
home, if we would make conquest abroad, is a growing con- 
viction with thinking people everywhere. It is a matter for 
congratulation and thanksgiving that the function of the 
Home Mission Board, as a great constructive, unifying, and 
developing agency of Southern Baptist is more fully appre 
ciated than ever before. Our people are satisfied to tithe 
mint and cummin and anise, while the weightier matters 
of the law are neglected. Mere quibbling about methods is 
a thing of the past. With a face forward and outward, 
with a mighty host of well-nigh two million Baptists in the 
South, increasing marvelously in numbers, wealth, and intel- 
ligence, every consideration of fidelity to our principles and 



20 



MINUTES OF THE ♦ 



loyalty to our Lord must move us to make this Southland 
a great Baptist empire." 

What we have done, however, is small in comparison 
with the great need still lying out before us. Our rapidly 
growing towns and cities, ana the vast number of foreigners 
which are beginning to pour in upon us, and are likely to 
continue to do in increasing numbers, are bringing about 
new conditions in the South. It is conceded that the cities 
rule the nation. In some Northern cities, the foreign eres 
rule the city. This may be true in the South. Hence tne im- 
portance of the foreigners being Christianized before they 
are naturalized. If this is done, it will be done largely 
through Home Missions. And, if ever done, it must be done 
as the foreigners come and as the cities grow. For if we wait 
till the forces of evil are thoroughly entrenched, as they are 
in many of the cities of the North, the task will be hope- 
less. 

And the work among our own native born people, es- 
pecially in the mountain section, is just as important to-day 
as ever. 

The prospect of the early opening of the Panama Canal 
is creating an urgent need in the Gulf section, as well as in 
Panama, Cuba, and the Isle of Pines. 

As we view the whole situation, we feel constrained to 
urge a great forward movement in Home Missions. 

R. S. GREEN, 
P. M. SNIDER. 

Committee. 

State Missions was discussed by Henry Sheets. 

Pledges were taken* for State Missions amounting to 
$408.00, an increase of $20.50 over last year. The pledges 
at the Association in 1907 amounted to $387.50. 

Home Missions was discussed by T. S. Crutchfield. 

Pledges were taken on Home Missions which amounted 
to $215.00, an increase of $10.00 over last year. 

The pledges at the Association in 1907 amounted to 
$205.00. The reports were adopted. 

Joseph T. Watts was elected to represent this Associa- 
tion on the State Board of Missions. 



Henry Sheets read the 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 
The Liberty Association stands for this work, and as our 
churches have hitherto contributed to this special depart- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



ment of our denominational work in the State, we pledge 
ourselves to continue the same. 

We recommend that our churches give one Sunday at 
least to this work. 

HENRY SHEETS. 

The report was adopted. 



Joseph T. Watts offered the following resolution which 
was unanimously adopted. 

Eesolved: That the thanks of the body be expressed 
to the Denton church and people, especially the good women, 
for their kind hospitality shown toward us during the As- 
sociation. They have entertained the members and visitors 
in royal style, and it has been a pleasure to us all to be in 
their homes. JOS. T. WATTS. 



J. W. Noell, S. H. Averitt, P. S. Vann were elected del- 
egates to the State Baptist Convention. 

Joseph T. Watts, alternate Archibald Johnson, were 
elected to represent our body in the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention. 

Moved and carried to pay the Clerk ten dollars for his 
services and publish as many copies of the Minutes as the 
Minute Fund would pay for. 
' R. L. Wall read the 

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The Association adjourned to meet again with Liberty 
church on Thursday after the third Sunday in August 1909. 

This session of the Association was in every way en- 
couraging. The pledges on all objects were increased, har- 
mony and brotherly love prevailed, and an increased love 
for the work was manifest. 



SOCIETIES IN LEXINGTON CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 35. Mrs. S. D. Swaim, 
Lexington, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Foreign Missions $27.25 

Home Missions 20.35 

State Missions 15.00 



Total for Missions $62.60 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



Carpet Fund . , 27.94 



Total given $90.54 

SUNBEAMS (LEXINGTON.) 
Number of members — 15. 

Miss Louise Turnley is President. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Foreign Missions . . . . . . . .70 

Home Missions • 5.06 



Total given $5.76 



SOCIETIES IN THOMASVILLE CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 23, Miss Cora Morton, 
Thomasville, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Foreign Missions $41.70 

Home Missions 60.55 

State Missions 49.10 



Total for Missions 151.35 

Total for Missions 152.35 

AmountAmount in Treasury 3.40 



Total given $154.75 

SUNBEAMS (THOMASVILLE.) 
Number of members 25. 

Miss Kate Johnson, Thomasville, is President. 
CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Foreign Missions $ 6.85 

Home Missions 31.11 

State Missions 2.27 



Total for Missions $40.23 

Orphanage in kind 3.00 

Amount in Treasury 1.11 

Total given , $44.34 



SOCIETIES IN WALLBURG CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 10. 

Mrs. C. M. Wall, Wallburg, N. C, is President. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

CONTRIBUTIONS, 

Foreign Missions $19.06 

Home Missions . . . . 35.70 

State Missions 26.62 



Total for Missions $81.38 

Orphanage Woman's Building 18.75 



Total given $100.13 



SUNBEAMS (WALLBURG.) 
Miss Ida Wall, is President. 
Number of members — 46. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

f Foreign Missions 

Home Missions 

State Missions . . 

Total for Missions . , 

SOCIETY IN JERSEY CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 16. 

Mrs. D. E. Webb, Linwood, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Foreign Missions $ 7.64 

Home Missions 4.23 

State Missions . . . . 4.35 



Total for Missions ; . . . . $16.22 

Orphanage Woman's Building 13.10 

Building and Repairing Church 173.73 

Other objects .41 



Total given $203.46 



SOCIETY IN DENTON CHURCH. 

The Society has a membership of 14. 

Mrs. Thomas Tysinger, Denton, N. C, is President. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Foreign Missions $ 5.00 

Home Missions 2,20 

State Missions 3.40 



Total for Missions $10.60 



$ 5.59 
9.04 
5.37 

$20.00 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



Orphanage Woman's Building .. 2.53 

Pastor 's Salary . . 8.00 

Cleaning church 1.25 

Total given . . . $22.38 

Or and total given through the Woman's Missionary 

Societies and Sunbeam Bands $641.36 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. P. S. VANN, 
Associational Vice-President. 



O ; O , 



c 05 ■ 

HI ~S> CD 



o rt £ t= 



3 2 

a 5 

o 

ct> d 

•< 

05 



So 
o 



r.i /r> sr rr* ►-■ ^- in cd eo tr m x a*/ 
s 3 



CD o 



CD po 



w CD 

5 cr 

GO 5 

E o 



« p=T cd G. k 

03 o 

O CD 



2 3 



S S-S 

o o 

-J O 
O 

CD 

CD 



cn pi co co -a to o in to to o to 
o o en o o bi O o o © o cn 
oooooooooooo 



tO *^ C71 4^ " t-i tO tO 4^ 

-3 C5 (31 W M M (S O Ol Ol O 

o to o © © to © © © © © 

©.Cl OOOClOOOOO 



© ©en©©©"©©©©'©©© 

O'OOOOOOOOOOOO 



tO ©.£ t h-'l-'tOtOCOCn©t-»tO»-i 



State Missions 



OIOIOIX) 



~3 rfi. On CO 



r 7 " Home Missions 
o © 



Hppopcnpww Foreign Missions I 

©©en©'©©©bv 

o o o o o o o o I 



to Ol oo 



cn co h* 
© © © en 
o o o o 



I— 1 to 

P 5* Orphanage 
o © 

o o 



Education 



Ministerial Relief 



Liberty Institute 



-q W tO 



CO 

Oi W M -■/) 

cn o o o o o in in o bi in ct © 
ooooooooooooo 



baiaoioHcno 

nrrv TOT d C53 iO O M -4< M 
b IV JjUOi j -o LO —I CO © O © t- 

j<M t— 1 H N H -?<I 

| 7-1 


488.01 
2,878.33 
135.18 
| 323.86 


• • o o 

; • © lO 

• - CO id 

• • CM Csj 

: : ^ 


■ H M O M ifl D- O 

; H «5 00 M t- 00 M «C 

■dot-indriddx 

•OOJi3 5)OOOOMrt 

■ O tj<N H H(M H CO O 


juO O 

pun j a^nuiHi^— 


r-i r-i r-i 




■ S rH LO S 
: r-i CM r-5 r-i 


• • o o 

: : ^ 

T— 1 


2.00 
2.50| 

. ... 


© LO © LO © © 

© co tr~^ © to 

r-i r-i ' ' CM* CM 


s^oefqo 








© © © © 

r-i LO r-i LO 
CM r-i tH ^ 




* ^> <^> CvJ OO 

• © o © eo 
' csj cm r- i oo 

: CO t- <M tH 


8.00 












© tH • 00 CM 
© LO © © 
T-t'o^ • LO* t~ 
CT • 00 CO 




o 

LO 




© © tJH CM 
O © 00 © 
r-5 Tt" CM* CO 




• o o o o 

; © © © © 

• m in c<i n 




1.50 


•cocbOLOooocoo 
• c<3oloooc\iooo 
•©idodcM'cMr-ir-i'sj'in 


noireonpg 


5.00 




O O OO O 
r-i CO* CM* LO* 




• o o o o 

; © © © © 

• OO LO CO CO* 




© 
© 

CO* 


• © o © © o 

• © © © LO © 

• © id co cxi cxi 


© © © 

© © 

r-i ©* LO 

<M 


put gQgenoo 
































10.00 





eS'BU'BTidJO 



suoissiXM 'oUioh 



iuotssiiM aws 



sasuadxg 
looqos ^^puns 



sie}U9pioui 



pu'B Suipitng 



CO C- rH 



p 1 

3 2 



%3 

o 



ca - 

^ CQ 



Jed 



' CD 

; ax J 

, ES I g 

a 03 oS 

■ IS ^ 

^ . • 

03 1—1 



02 ' 
02 ^ 

>SS 

el k'k 
: o © £ _*> 

-2 A CI G 

,0 03 m rti 



03 



o3 n 

~h £ ^ o 

03 n 03 a 

> rd 

S o9 « 



d cuo 

S d - 

<x> - 

Jt 03 CI oa 
§ o 
« id 9, 

l**3*a 



Q © 
«5° 



• o 

03 K f-i 

«2 "d 03 M 

f-t P r— I CI 

(jj C13 .rM 



02 

d 

« CQ 





















• ^ 


o • • • 
© • • ; 
















© 
© 


• ©" 

• u ? 


o ' .'• '• 
















© 


'■ 


©oi • •©©©© • m i.o to o 

©00 • •©O©'* 1 • CD m H o 


© © 
O © 


■ -©©©©-Tl-©t~l© 

• ;LO©O0©©©©© 


|LO 
°^ 


. © 


sr- cj* ' • <n" !.c c-i • d co n d ■ 

: • <nj -co • • 


CM* id 


• • id id cNj id ' co* id id 

• • H H ^ 


OO 

1 © 

b 


■ T^' 

. OS 
. <N3 


© • • ■ © 
© • • • © 








• ■ © 

: : ^ 


© • • 
O ■ ■ 


© © 
© © 


• • © © © © • • tH © 

• • © © © LO : ; CXI O 




. 

. CM 


© • • • OO 
C3 • • • C<1 






• __1^0_ 


© : : 
^ • • 


CNJ LO 


• • GO LO r- i CO • : Tj" LO 

• • r-i CO • • © C\I 


id 
© 


' ©' 
• 


• © • © 

• o • © 






"© 
© 


• CO CO 

: ^ 


© • • 




~ • © © ~ ©" • © • 
; • © © • • © -CNJ • 


CM 

OO i 




'03 '• ©' 
• © • © 

; • © . 






© 


• CO OS 

• C- 

• iH © 






'. • o © • ■ OO -00* • 

• • LO CNJ - • C\l • CS • 

• • r-i © • • tH • 


CO ' : 

^^ 

©_ 


' 

. CO 


• tH 














• • r-i '• '• • ^_ 






© © LO © © © © © 
©OS CM ©©CO©© 


• © © © © • • 

• © © © © • 


• © " 


•©©©©© ©"© © © 
•©©©©©©©©© 


m 


"Tco~ 

• LO 


© tj" c-^ © © t-" © © 

LO tH © LO Tf LO CO 
rH rH rH rH 


• ©' © »xd © .* ' 

• LO © t- LO • • 

• tH r- ! 


■ ©' 

■ LO 
• T— 1 


' t>* ©* ©' ©' o* t>* id ©' id 
• c-©Lo©oLOcomt>- 

•HNriHH Cx3 rH 


CO 

CM 


• rH 

• © 










r-t 








co" 


". co" 



o 



Sec 



35 



.2* 
• S 

^ 03 

03 .2 — 

03 HJ 

. is ^ 



OOCOlOH^H^t-O ^ 
©CMCMrHCO ^LOH? 



o c 



CO 

o o o 



g « W w ^ ^ 

Boo 

^ CP o 

h rd Sid 



03 a> 

cd 



-? cc c3 
^ *S ^ 
v* CQ CQ 



• CP 02 

03 Id 

. d €8 ■ • 

o o 



&JD 03 



CS 03 U o' 



03 

03 . ^ 
r* O 



^ ^ O C X fcj ptj rjQ CQ E- H 





























03 












f-l 






O 


© 






© 




O 




03 


C.3 










*s 


03 


03 








6 


O 











' O OS 

sasuadxg looqos i- as 



T -UOJJ SlUSI^d'B{I 



to © o © 

© O O 

cm lo cm 





<m as 

r- 1 




HHH 


• ffa cm cm © 

•HHH 




CO CO 


CM Ci CM CM Ol © O CM <M 
i— 1 H rH H H H H 


1193113 J, 

sjoded put; 'a^ij^r^ 


• o ~ 

• co 




OlOW • 


• LO • • H/i 

• o • .as 

. rH . . 




00 © 


O N O H t-(M LO • LO 
CO CM LO OO LO H l~ • tH 
CO LO' rH • rH 


iCjBjqn in -joa ojsi 






© • lo • 
o • c- • 


• • • © O 

• • • o © 

• • -HH 








sjooipg jo jaquin^ 


H 'h 




H H CO 


•HNHH 




tH H 


rH CO rH • rH rH h'h* ~H 




IS CO 

tH Ttl 




O LO l>- 00 
<M LO CO Tt< 
H 


• oo as 




© LO 
rJH LO 


l>©05t>M00OC»10 
© OS CM © OO CO ITS LO CO 
CO rH rH • rH 




o o 




NHON 

H iota •* 

tH 


•l> WOIO 
• t- <M oo 




© © 
TJH LO 


LOt-t'OLfJ'^WOO 
00t~H©tHC0^LOCO 
CO rH rH rH 


•qo'cajL puo sjeoigo 


c- co 




t~ "<tfi t~ CO 


• oo o t- as - 

cm 




~co LO 


(MCJSMOOO^LOOOIO 
HHH 



LO IO CO © 
CO LO H © 
© 0O CM* CO 




o 



P0JOJS9H 



m 
W 
O 

E 
& 
o 

Eh 

TO 

o 

Oh 

Q 

£>■ 
<J 

ui 



»0 .tH 5DHCOOKNJ 
i-l iH tH 


■ M co m w 

• T* CO LO 
;H«HH • 


• rf so 

• CO CO 


■MKKNCt^lCHOiAO 
i^^COSOrHOSO 


-co lo 

© 1 SO 
^ 1 ^ 


1 O CO Ti* co"^h" F^o" lo" 

© T* SO CO CO rH 

! 1—1 r-j 








co" eo*" 

rH t> 
LO 

SO | LO_ 


• O OS CO t>* • 

: hh 


• CO 

• CO OO 


' ^ 22 £5 w ^ ° th~ lo 

SO CO OS CO > j SO CO 


j LO (M W H 05 

■ • • • • coTh " 


• CO OS t— i LO • 
■ SO CO LO CD • 

~os". ; : r~~ 


' tH LO 


•SOt-^bOLOrHSOTfi IcT 
Hj OO SO CO CO CO CO CO 


.r±.|.r±. 

tH 1 CO 

so o 
© q 

tH 1 tH 


• Tt< • • ... 


cm r 


• ; • • -co -co • th 


OS |lo 

lo Icq 

SO ItH 

CO los 

CO 'H 
t> [OO 
LO 1 O 
IH 1 tH 


:co . . -co • . ." 

| • • • tH • • . 


• ■ OS Tf 00 • 

• • LO CM • 


: — r 


• so ^ oo os -so • 7 

1 H "* • tH • CO . 


t~ LO • • t> LO CO rH 


• OS GO 00 rH ■ 

• T* tH 


CO rH 


•0SOS0tJ<C0tHC00SC- 


• • . .(MHH 


' • CO t— 1 • • 




." ; 00 ^ ; ; 1H • -co 


tH it* 
CO CO 
CO i.tH 
CO_ CO 
CO CO 
rH i SO 

th ! 


• tH • • CM tH • • 


• CO • t>- r-i 




| •HN'* . . . ,h ~ 


CO Tfi • • LO CXI tH • 


• SO LO • . . . 

• t*i tH • . . . 


CO tH 


" os so co ~co~ ~CO 00 TtT 


LO LO • t-* O CO OO CO 
tH • tH CO 


* OS C- CO OS • • 
t> tH CO 


• tH 


* CO LO tH r— 1 • rH CO 


LO TH 

00 so 
eo co_ 

O OO 
tH ' 






'• * . ~ 


• • SO . CO • rH • • . 


tH CO -CO • • -CO 


• -CO • CO ■ . 

• CO . 




• O • • . • h H lO M 

• TH • . . . ^ 


CO OO 
t- SO 
LO OS 
t>- OO 
CO rH 


"tf 1 CO • OS O CO 00 • 
tH CXI 


* OS OO CO t~- . . 

H (N . . 


• tH 


" H H H ■ rH • tH 











.a h 



be 



_^ o 



So 

to CD 
<1 <| O 



CD 
5-. 

o 

TO ~ 



- 02 ffi ' 

© si 2 

.73 © © 

_?to © 

s-2 



. " o 

O ^3 
O CJD 

■ « 

: ^ 2 h 00 
'sill 



O O CD 
-*->-*-'!> 

P P o3 

CD CD 

o a a 



o 9 



j3 P 

' .2S p 

I a 

© CD 

Q<i 



• § ? S S S 

P ^PS^^^rP 

g - S ,cj CQ O ^ 

; Eh I j gH J ^ fe 



_ r u § q .£ bp 

•asRli* I'll 

^'<i<iEH"d§Q • 



P 

^ H 

£«3 



P +3 K 
PS © P 



p- 5 

5 ^ 

HH » _ 



a 



. CJD « 
P § 

®P ©'O U r~ 



CvS CD © „ 



O fe ffi 

* 3 O O Pi Pi w to 



O g 

o 

03 £1 
Eh Eh 



Eh :H 



The 

Libert y- Pie d mont 
Institute 

Wallburg, Davidson County, N. C, j 

^^^^ | 

Hubert W. Early, A. B. (W. F. Cj Principal. 

Prepares Boys and Girls for College or Uni- 
versity. New Brick Building, costing $18,000; 
with. Electric Lights, Waterworks, Steam 
Heat. Healthful and Beautiful Location. 
Thorough Instruction; Moral Life Wholesome, 
Aiming to Reveal What is Best in Life. Boys 
and Girls have Separate Dormitories in Sep- 
arate Buildings, and Social intermingling ex- 
cept under the eye of a teacher is Positively 
o s Suspenses, icludir 2 en thing 
Except Laundry,, from $80 to $100 per Session 
of 84 Weeks. For Bulletin and Information, . 
Address 

Liberty-Piedmont Institute, 

Wallburg, - North Carolina 



MINUTES 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 

( Seventy -Seventh A nniversary. ) 



Liberty Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



LIBERTY CHURCH, 

AUGUST 19, 20 and 21, 1909. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

Moderator— Henry Sheets Lexington, N. (X 

Clerk— P. S. Vann Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer — S. H. Averitt Thomas ville, N. C. 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER FOR NEXT SESSION. 

Place of next meeting — The Orphanage. 
Time of next meeting — September 6, 7, 8, 1910. 
To preach the Introductory Sermon — A. K. Wright. Alternate — 
S. D. Swaim. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION, 
AUGUST, 1909. 

W. S. Adderton Denton, N. C. 

Lee Carrick Linwood N. C. 

T. S. Crutchfield Thomasville, N. C. 

M. L. Kesler Thomasville, N. C. 

M. J. Leach Lassiter, N. C. 

H. Morton Thomasville, N. C. 

J. D. Newton Thomasville, N. C. 

He*ary Sheets Lexington, N. C. 

S. D. Swaim Lexington, N. C. 

A. K. Wright Lexington, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

fft. K. Williams, C. M. Wall, R. S. Green, 

P. S. Vann, Grover Palmer. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Thomasville, X. C, Route Xo. 3. 

August 19. 1909. 
The seventy-sixth annual session of the Liberty Baptist 
Association met in Liberty Church on August 19. 1909. 

At 11:30 in the morning, the Introductory sermon was 
preached by Elder S. D. Swaim. His theme was ; "Faith 
without works is dead/"' There was then an intermission of 
one and one-half hours for dinner. 



Aftebxoox Sessiox. 

August 19. 1909. 

At two o'clock the Association was called to order by the 
Clerk. Prayer was offered by H. Morton. 

Henry Sheets was elected Moderator pro tern. 

The Moderator appointed B. S. Green and S. D. Swaim. 
to read the letters from the churche-. 

The delegates from the churches were as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — C. H. Teague, D. S. Hayworth. N. R. Teague.. 

Asheboro — J. D. Bo^en, C. G. Frazier. J. W. Trogden. 

Center Hill— C. A. Owen. A. V. Miller. E. D. Jarrett. 

Denton — W. B. Russell, J. A. Henderson. 

Gravel Hill— T. H. Davis, E. M. Russell, W. A. Strickland.. 

Holloway's — B. R. Cross, W. D. Star. 

Jersey — J. B. Rainier, George Barnes. 

Lexington — G. W. Miller. 

Liberty — Jas. Easter, H. P. May. A. S. Miller. 

Lick Creek— P. M. Snider. 

New Friendship — B. F. Charles, A. P. Snider. 

Orphanage — M. L. Kesler. 

Pine Meeting House — 

Reed's Cross Roads — 

Rich Fork— W. M. Eddinger. S. L. Eddinger, G. W. Leonard. 
Stoner's Grove — 

Summerville — C. B. Wall, Jason Buie. 
Taylor's Grove — D. W. Summey. 

Thomasville — R. S. Green. A. J. Olive. J. T. Valentine. 
Wallburg— J. B. Motsinger, C. M. Wall, Carroll Wall. 

On motion, P. S. Vann was instructed to cast the ballot 
for Henry Sheets for Moderator. 

On motion. S. D. Swaim was instructed to cast the ballot 
for S. H. Averitt for Treasurer. 

A. K. Wright and J. D. Bowen were welcomed into the 
Association. 

The following visitors were recognized: A. L. Betts. for 
the Recorder; F. W. Hancock, for. Oxford Seminary: L. 



4 



J ohnson, Corresponding Secretary for State Missions ; C. E. 
Maddrey, State Vice-President for Home Missions. 

The chair appointed Thomas Carrick, C. M. Wall, and 
S. D. Swaim committee on order of business for the session. 

On motion of S. D. Swaim, it was carried to discuss the 
subject of Periodicals. 

On motion of Thomas Carrick, it was carried to appoint 
the pastor of Liberty church with the deacons of said church 
a committee on Keligious Exercises for the session. 

By request of J. IX Bowen, pastor of the Asheboro church, 
said church was granted a letter of dismission to unite with 
the Piedmont Association. 

The Moderator appointed the following Finance Commit* 
tee : E. S. Green, C. EL Teague and G. W. Miller. 

M. L. Kesler read the report on Periodicals. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The. Biblical Recorder has held a peculiar place in the affections 
of those who have known it during all the years of its life * * * * 
There has been no growth but the Recorder was its prophet; no 
new enterprise or institution but the Recorder was the herald of 
its advance. * * * * But now to the obligations of gratitude and 
to the consideration of our own interests has been added a new 
reason. * * * * We have taken upon ourselves the right and power 
of an equal share in naming its editor and directing its policy 
* * * * Necessarily there follows a new responsibility. Having 
m our hands the right to advise in its management, we should 
have in our hearts the desire to give it a larger success. * * * * 
From this day on, the Recorder should be a recognized agency of 
this Convention, a department of our work, entitled to its own 
place on our programs and to its own share of our affections The 
Recorder should stand at the door of the Convention and of the 
various associations, not as a beggar seeking subscriptions but 
as the voice of a great denomination calling us and all of us into 
a greater knowledge and a larger work. * * * * If through the 
Recorder we can reach our people every week, if they can come 
to know our work and its needs, if in its pages there may be estab- 
lished a community of thought and interest then we may expect 
greater and still greater things for our cause, our growth and our 
usefulness to the world. 

We endorse the above extract from the report adopted by the 
last Baptist State Convention. We further recommend that here- 
after the report on periodicals be a report on The Biblical Recorder 
and that it be so designated; and further that other periodicals 
be discussed under their respective objects. Also we suggest 
that pastors observe a Recorder day and deliver sermons or 
addresses on the Recorder as they do on other objects of our 
Convention. M. L. KESLER, 

For Committee. 

The report was discussed by M. L. Kesler, A. L. Betts 
and T. S. Crutchfield. 
The report was adopted. 



5 



The Moderator appointed P. S. Vann, J. T. Valentine 
and C. A. Owen committee on time and place of next session. 
The Committee on order of business reported as follows: 



Thursday. 



Q 
O 


Q A 


to 




A 

Tt 






A r! innrnmpTit — T 1 prn npranop 








Friday. 


9 


30 


to 


10:00 — Religious exercises. 


10 


00 


to 


11:00 — Home Missions. 


11 


00 


to 


12:00— State Missions. 


12 


00 


to 


1:30— Recess. 


1 


30 


to 


2 : 15 — Orphanage. 


2 


15 


to 


3:30— Education. 


3 


30 


to 


Adjournment — Ministerial Relief. 








Saturday. 


9 


30 


to 


10 : 00 — Religious exercises. 


10 


00 


to 


10:30— Obituaries. 


10 


30 


to 


11:15 — Foreign Missions. 


11 


15^ 


to 


12:00 — Ministerial Education. 


12 


00 


tt> 


12:30— Sunday Schools. 


12 


30 


to 


Adjournment — Miscellaneous Business. 



J. D. Newton read the report on Temperance. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

It is sufficient to say that the liquor business has had its deatn 
blow in our State. 

We must declare our disapproval of newspaper or circular adver- 
tising of intoxicating drinks. 

We. must encourage every effort to enforce existing laws on 
{strong drink and discourage by all reasonable means the use of the 
{same. J. D. NEWTON. 

The report was discussed by J. D. Newton, A. K. Wright, 
T. S. Crutchfield, F. W. Hancock, Thomas Carrick, IT. Mor- 
ton, S. D. Swaim and W. G. Fitzgerald. 
( The report was adopted. 

M. L. Kesler moved that the debt on the History of Lib- 
lerty Association be paid by giving negotiable note. The fol- 
lowing pastors agreed to become responsible for the debt, 
with their churches as follows : T. S. Crutchfield, $30 ; S. I). 
Swaim, $25; A. K. Wright, $25 ; Henry Sheets, $10. 
I C. M. Wall became responsible for $10. 

T. S. Crutchfield was appointed to preach at 8:15 p. in. 

J. D. Bowen was appointed to conduct devotional exercises 
on Friday a. m., 9:30 to 10:00. 

On motion, the Association was adjourned with prayer by 
J. D. Bowen. 



1 

FKIDAY MORNING. 

August 20, 1909. 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator at 
10 o'clock. Prayer was offered by J. M. Trogden. 

The unfinished business about the debt on the publication 
of the* History of Liberty Association was taken from the 
table. The debt being paid except one hundred and fifty, 
dollars, this amount was settled by giving a note for the? 
above amount. 

T. S. Crutchfield read the report on Home Missions. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Our Home Mission Board has headquarters in Atlanta, Ga. Dr. 
B. D. Gray is the Corresponding Secretary. His report of the work 
of the Board to the last session of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion was indeed an encouraging message to those who are inter- 
ested in the carrying out of our Lord's command, recorded in Mat 
28:19-20. The Conventional year, closing Nov. 1908, seems to have 
been a kind of harvest of the seed sowing of previous years. 

The Board had employed 961 missionaries and 5 evangelists; 
and through their efforts, there were 22,404 people baptized last 
year, and 337 churches constituted. This is an average of a little 
more than 61 baptisms for every day in the year, and a little more 
than one church for each week day in the year. 

In the Biblical Recorder of Aug. 4, 1909, V. I. Masters, Editorial 
Secretary of the Board has a very encouraging article under the 
caption: Some Significant Home Mission Facts. To show further 
how abundantly the Lord is blessing the Home Mission work of 
Southern Baptists, I quote the following from that article: "A search 
through the annual reports of each one of the Home Mission Boards 
of the larger evangelical denominations in America, some of whom 
spent three times as much on their work as we did, does not show 
a single instance in which half as many additions to churches 
resulted from Home Mission work." The comparison here made is 
with our own work. 

The Board embraces in its territory fifteen of our Southern 
and Central States with Cuba and Panama. 

The recent material development of the South and the turning 
tide of immigration Southward are creating conditions which ren- 
der it imperative that we as Southern Baptists shall lengthen 
our cords and strengthen our stakes in Home Mission work. And 
the Southwest is becoming a more and more important mission fj eld 
because of the fact that men of high ideals and power are now 
taking the place of the unstable adventurer of other days. The 
Southwest is destined to become more extensive and important. 
The rapid growth of cities all through the South makes it important 
that we get a hold in them before they grow to too great propor- 
tions. A city is like an individual, in that religion must get its hold 
upon it while young or the situation is almost or quite hopeless. 
To-day is the day of opportunity for Christ's cause in the cities of 
the South. 

And foreigners are coming to the South by the hundreds, thus 
bringing Foreign Mission work right to our doors. We must 
Christianize them or they will heathenize vast sections of our 
cities as they have already done in the North. 

In view of the great needs of the Home Board to prosecute this 



7 



work, our State Convention has recommended that the State raise 
$25,000.00 for this object this year. And we as a committee recom- 
mend that our Association do a goodly part in this, and also prepare 
for still larger things in the future. And let us place as a plank in 
our platform: The whole of our Southland for Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. S. CRUTCHFIELD, 
J. T. VALENTINE, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by C. E. Maddrey. 

Pledges were taken for this object amounting to $215.50. 

The report was adopted. 

Thomas Carrick read the report on State Missions. 
THE REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

The work of State Missions has been emphasized by the Baptist 
□f North Carolina to a greater or less degree for the last one 
hundred years. 

| One of the fundamental objects in view in the organization of 
^he Baptist State Convention was that of supplying the destitute 
sections of the State with the preaching of the gospel. This work 
pas gone on in its organized form for more than three quarters 
pf a century. 

| The work of State Missions has not been uniform in its success 
[from the beginning. For many years the means and men for car- 
trying on this work were limited and the success of the State 
fission work was variable. For the last thirty years or more the 
brogress has been steady, and the increase in means and mission- 
aries have advanced all along the lines until now we have reached 
%he highest success in the history of State Mission work. 
I The number of missionaries this year is 148; number baptized 
by missionaries last year 2,047; the amount to be raised for State 
Missions this year, $40,000. Yet there is great need to enlarge 
the work. It is estimated that some 600,000 adults in our State are 
Unconverted, that is about half of our adult population. We need 
Jmore money and more men to press forward in this work. 
! I am not definitely informed as to the work in this Association 
(for this year but am sure that good work is being done, but there 
are still many destitute sections that ought to have preaching with 
a view to organising churches. 

! Much has been done but much more needs to be done. The 
(work grows upon us year by year. 

I Will not the . churches of our Association and the churches all 
over the State awake to the importance of the work of State Mis- 
sions. As the State Mission work advances so will all the other 
interests of the Convention prosper. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. CARRICK, 
C. M. WALL, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by Livingston Johnson. 
Pledges were taken amounting to $391.00. 
The report was adopted. 

The chair appointed the following committees: 

To nominate the Executive Board of the Association — A. K. 
Wright, Jeff Lanning and J. D. Newton. 



8 



To nominate Trustees of Liberty-Piedmont Institute — T. S. Crutch 
field, G. W. Miller and D. S. Hayworth. 

The committee on time, place and preacher for next session 
of the Association read the following report : 

We. recommend that our next session convene Tuesday after th< 
first Sunday in September, 1910, that it convene at ThomasvilL 
Baptist Orphanage, and that A. K. Wright preach the Introductory 
sermon, with alternate S. D. Swaim. 

This report was adopted. 

The Association, at his own request, excused the Modera 
tor to attend his appointment. 

The Moderator appointed the following brethren to pr§| 
pare reports on the subjects preceding their names, for th< 
next session of the Association : 

State Missions — S. D. Swaim, J. D. Palmer. 
Home Missions — T. S. Crutchfield, W. B. Thompson. 
Foreign Missions — A. K. Wright, G. W. Miller. 
Periodicals — C. M. Wall, B. R. Cross. 
Orphanage — Thomas Carrick, Chas. A. Owen. 
Sunday Schools — R. K. Williams, J. T. Valentine. 
Ministerial Relief— P. M. Snider, O. L. Stoner. 
Temperance — H. W. Early, S. H. Kindley. 
Obituaries — H. Morton, C. H. Teague. 
Woman's Work — P. S. Vann, Archibald Johnson. 
Ministerial Education — S. H. Averitt and A. P. Snider. 

Adjourned with prayer by J. D. Newton. 



Afternoon Session. 

August 20, 1909. 

The Association was called to order by S. D. Swaim, Mod- 
erator pro tern. 

Prayer was offered by J. M. Trogden. . 

M. L. Kesler read the report on the Thomasville Or- 
phanage. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 

To be interested in the helpless and needy, is to be like Jesus 
It was this spirit that promoted the building of the Baptist Orphan 
age. Twenty-five years ago this institution took shape. Now wc 
have a plant with 450 acres of land, 150 of which are in cultivation 
The children are wisely being taught all kinds of manual labor 
which will qualify them for the active duties of life. 

There are nearly 400 children to be cared for by our people. 

This work has been growing upon our people all the time, nol 
alone for the good that is being done, but the Baptist brotherhood 
have entire confidence in the management. 

And then there are people visiting this place year by year whc 
never saw it before. They invariably return with tender feelings 
in their hearts for the work. They tell their friends and thus the 



9 



iterest widens. Another thing which must not be overlooked: 
le management has had no secrets about the work as it is being 
Erried on. All our people know, or may know, where every dollar 
f their money goes. Because of this policy, there is absolutely 
o ground for suspicion. 

Charity and Children edited by Archibald Johnson, has played 

small part in bringing about this fine condition. Every Baptist 
imily in this Association should take and read this paper. 

It is the opinion of your committee, that the work of sustaining 
le Orphanage at Thomasville has done as much to stimulate, 
nd develop in our people the grace of giving, as any other single 
gency. 

But let us never forget that the work is growing year by year 
nd that the demands are in an increasing ratio. Let every man, 
roman and child bear some part in carrying on this great work. 

HENRY SHEETS, 
O. L. STONER, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by M. L. Kesler. 

Pledges were taken on this object amounting to $460.50. 

j The report was adopted. 

H. W. Early read the report on Education. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

The Christian education is the hope of the world. The funda- 
mental principles of civilization spring from the bedrock of Chris- 
^an education. 

1 As a denomination let us pursue no narrow policy. Let us not 
[ppose the State in its efforts to improve educational conditions, 
rat at the same time, let us not fail to give our denominational 
chools that hearty and loyal support to which they are so justly 
ntitled. The crises in the life of many of our own schools is not 
let passed. Now is the time when we, as a denomination, should 
train every nerve and bend all our energy to keep well to the 
ront in that great educational movement that is now sweeping 
ver our Southland like a mighty tidal wave. 

The debt that mankind owes to Christian education can never 
ie paid. The history of education shows that for centuries no 
ther education existed; that it was by the efforts of the church 
hat our present secular institutions of learning came into exist- 
nce; that many of the elements in our modern civilization — paint- 
ng, music, architecture, sculpture — had their origin in religion, 
len should not, then, so lightly esteem a past that has made pos- 
ible a present so glorious. 

Our denominational schools seek as the great purpose of their 
xistence that elevation of character of which the cultured mind is 
>ut a part. They seek to instill into the minds and hearts of their 
tudents those principles of honor, justice, and truth that will make 
hem worthy leaders of men. They can and do give a broader and 
oore general culture than our secular schools. In them, and 
hem alone, can be taught, legitimately, the Bible — and we believe 
hat no system of education which does not give instruction in 
Jod's Word is complete. 

For these and other reasons we believe that our boys and girls 
hould, if possible, receive their education in our own schools, 
"herefore, we renew our allegiance to Wake Forest College, Mere- 
ith College Liberty-Piedmont Institute, and pledge them our most 
oyal support. 



, 

The report was discussed by H. W. Early, J. H. Gorrell 
and R. T. Vann. 

The report was adopted. 

R. S. Green read the report on v Ministerial Relief. 
REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

The object of the Baptist Ministers Relief Board is to "afford 
aid and relief to needy Baptist ministers of North Carolina and 
to their widows." 

All donations to the Board are to be applied as follows: One-third 
to be invested as a permanent interest bearing fund, the interest 
on which, together with the remaining two-thirds, shall be placed 
at the immediate disposal of the Board. 

The Board consists of nine members appointed by the Baptist 
State Convention, to which body it is required to make an annual 
report, and conduct all its operations under the charter of the 
same. 

To entitle any minister to the benefits of the Board he must 
be a Baptist minister belonging to a regular Baptist church identi- 
fied with the Baptist State Convention. If not a native, he musij 
have resided in the State and served churches as pastor or evangel- 
ist at least five years prior to his application. 

He must by reason of age or physical infirmity be incapable 
of regular pastoral work, his pecuniary condition must be such 
as to render the aid asked for necessary to his support and his! 
moral character must be such as becomes a minister of the gospel. 

All applications for aid must receive the endorsement of the 
Moderator and Executive Committee of the Association in which 
the applicant resides. 

No officer of the board receives compensation for services ren-j 
dered, except the actual expenses of a member when attending to 
the business of the board, the same to be approved by the Presi- 
dent and Auditor. 

There are 32 beneficiaries on the board at present. The consti- 
tution forbids the appropriation of a dollar that is not in hand. 
The amount given is quite small and serves only to help, rather than 
to provide a support. 

If unworthy persons are aided, it is the fault of the brethren 
of the churches at home, and not of the Board. 

We would earnestly commend that each of them take up a col- 
lection some time during the year for its support. We would 
further suggest that the churches of our Association adopt the 
plan now pursued by many churches of giving a Christmas offer- 
ing to these old ministers who have laid their lives upon the altar 1 
of the Lord. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 
ROBT. S. GREEN 

Committee 

The report was discussed by R. S. Green. 
The report was adopted. 

On motion of H. Morton, the Clerk was ordered to copy the 
pledges for this object as they were made at the last session. 

Jeff Tanning was appointed to conduct devotional exer- 
cises at 9 :30 Saturday a. m. 



11 



A. K. Weight was appointed to preach for the Association; 
at 8:15 this evening. 

The Association was adjourned with prayer by E. T. 
Yann. 
I 



SATURDAY MOKNTNG. 

August 21, 1909. 
The Association was called to order by S. D. Swaim, Mod- 
erator pro tern,. Prayer was offered by A. K. Wright. 

On motion, S. D. Swaim was asked to prepare a report 
on Obituaries and present this report for publication in our 
minutes. 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 
Once more it becomes the duty of your committee to record 
those who have left us for that "Vast Unknown" during the past 
I Associational year. They "are not dead, but asleep," and while we 
| mourn their absence for the time, we rejoice in the knowledge 
of their entrance into those mansions prepared by our Savior. 
May it be our effort to so live that when our final summons comes 
our "Lamps may be found trimmed and burning." We give below 
the list furnished by the Delegates: 

Liberty Church — Joshua Copple, Mrs. Mary Dorsett. 
Rich Fork — William Bowers. 
| Abbott's Creek— D. D. Orrell. 

Thomasville — E. B. Fitzgerald, Mrs. Endora V. Tranton. 
Summerville — Ollin Peterson. 
New Friendship — E. J. Hine. 

Lexington — We record our sorrowful sense of loss in the death 
of Brother Jas. Smith, who was a charter member of the Lexington 
Church and held the offices of Deacon, Treasurer, Trustee and Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the Sunday School, since the organization of 
the church. In the discharge of the duties of these offices he was 
always a faithful steward and zealous for the cause of the Master. 
In the office of treasurer he was ever ready to meet all obligations 
regardless of the State of the Treasury. His wise counsel and 
leadership will not only be missed in the Church but in the Asso- 
ciation of which he was Moderator for nineteen years, but our 
loss is his gain. 

S. D. SWAIM. 

Kind and appreciative words were made in memory of 
the life of our former Moderator, James Smith, by P. S. 
Yann, H. Morton, K. S. Green, C. EL Teague, A. P. Snider. 

S. D. Swaim read the report on Foreign Missions. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 
made a most hopeful and encouraging report for the year 1908. 

Workers and Results — Twenty-one new missionaries were sent 
out. There are now on the field 231 Missionaries and 375 native 
helpers, making a total of 606 workers. There are 259 churches 
and 559 out stations, with a total membership of 16,596 and 325 
Sunday-schools with a total of 10,430 scholars. There were 2,905 



12 



converts baptized during the year but tbe largest results due to 
the leavening power of the gospel among the people cannot be 
tabulated. 

Methods of Work — Of course the main thing is the preaching of 
the gospel and all that is done is aimed directly toward reaching 
the people with the Evangel of Christ. There are some valuable 
aids to the work of preaching which experience has taught our 
missionaries to use. One of the aids is the educational work. We 
have 142 schools with 3,846 scholars. All of these schools, even 
those in which elementary branches are taught have in view the 
training of native helpers. 

We have thirteen medical missionaries, three hospitals and 
eleven dispensaries with a total number of patients last year 
of 42,659. All of these patients with attendant friends heard the 
gospel preached before they received treatment. 

We have four printing plants which sent out during the year 
hundreds of thousands of religious tracts, periodicals, books and 
Bibles in the languages of the various countries. This literature 
is a powerful aid in the work of evangelization. 

The total receipts for last year were $460,997, a gain of $58,000 
over the year before. The Convention fixed the estimate for this 
year at $537,500. North Carolina is asked to give $45,000 of this 
amount. 

We recommend that special effort be made to secure a liberal 
contribution from every member of every church. We also urge 
our people to subscribe for the Foreign Mission Journal. 

S. D. SWAIM, 

Chairman Committee. 

The report was discussed by A. K. Wright. 

Pledges were taken on this object amounting to $410.00. 

The report was adopted. 

A. K. Wright read the report on Ministerial Education. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

The policy of our denomination, if we have one policy prominent 
above all the rest, is to give Truth, and True Liberty to the whole 
world. 

How are we to do this, unless our leaders and teachers are. 
prepared with the power of knowledge as well as understanding? 
With a foresight that amounted almost to inspiration, our fathers 
founded and equipped our great Baptist College back yonder in 
the past, in order to strengthen our cause in this worthy undertak- 
ing. The years have demonstrated the wisdom of their course. 

Some years ago, an influence was brought to bear upon the 
faculty, and Board of Trustees of that College, and they made 
it necessary for all Theological students to pay their way through 
College, as all other students, whether able or not. It took but a 
few years to show them their error. 

By a Providence that guides in all things in this world, the great 
number as well as the most powerful and efficient of His laborers 
in The Great Cause, are recruited from the ranks of the humble and 
the poor. And when God calls a poor boy into the ranks of His 
workers, to give their lives to The Cause, He calls also upon those 
of His followers who are able, to prepare and give the means for 
his proper equipment. 

The leaders of this day, must be prepared with training and 
knowledge as well as endowed with unction. God has more things 
in store for His people than we dream of. Our leaders must find 



13 



jut for us that they may lead us in. We must lend to them the 
lid that is necessary, and they will then in turn part the waters 
)f Ignorance for us, and lead into the Greater Inheritance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. F. HANKINS, 

H. C. MYERS, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by S. D. Swaim. 

On motion of A. K. Wright, the Clerk was instructed to 
record the pledges for this object the same as that pledged 
3y the different churches for last year. 

The report was adopted. 

A. K„ Wright read the report on Sunday Schools. 
REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The hope of our churches lies chiefly in the Sunday School since 
\t furnishes practically the only opportunity for systematic Bible 
study. Our churches will be strong in proportion to the Scriptural 
knowledge of their membership. 

; While our Sunday Schools report some advance in the number 
enrolled each year, yet the increase is not commensurate with the 
church's opportunity as compared with its membership, nor is it 
fin keeping with the general revival in Sunday School work through- 
out the country. 

I We would heartily commend the organized class idea as the best 
working basis for securing interest in the adult department. 

The subject of Missions needs to be emphasized in our schools 
I a more special way than the usual Missionary lesson. The 
report for last year shows that there were only 120 baptisms from 
the Sunday Schools in 21 churches. Since practically three fourths 
of our church members were led to Christ through the Sunday 
School we need to urge the matter of conversion and decision 
for Cnrist. 

The crying need in our Sunday School work is a better equip- 
ment for teaching and a better trained teaching force. 

We recommend that our Sunday School specialists be used when 
available. We heartily endorse the able presentation of the Sunday 
School lessons and discussions of Sunday School work in the 
Biblical Recorder and commend the publications of our Sunday 
School Board at Nashville. 

A. K. WRIGHT, 
P. M. SNYDER, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by A. K. Wright. 
Report was adopted. 

P. S. Vann read the report on Woman's Work. 

SUMMARY OF THE WOMAN'S WORK OF LIBERTY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Representatives of the Woman's Missionary Societies, Sunbeam 
Bands and Young Woman's Auxiliaries of the Liberty Association 
met at 9:30 a. m., in the Jersey Baptist Church in their third 
annual session Aug. 14, 1909. 

The meeting was called to order by Mrs. P. S. Vann, the Asso- 
ciational Vice-President, and all joined heartily in singing, "What 
a friend we have in Jesus." Psalm 33 was read, and prayer offered 
by Mrs. Vann. 

F 



14 



Mrs. D. E. Webb, of Jersey, delivered the address of welcome 
on behalf of the Woman's Missionary Society and the Ladies ot 
Jersey Church. Rev. A. K. Wright responded on behalf of the? 
Association. 

Appreciative words were spoken to the delegates and visitors! 
by the Vice-President. 

Mrs. A. K. Wright was appointed Secretary of the Association. 

Delegates from the following societies responded to the roll 
call. The W. M. S. of Lexington, Jersey, Wallburg and Orphanage. 
The Y. W. A. of Lexington, the Sunbeams of Lexington and Wall-! 
burg. The W. M. S. and Sunbeams of Thomasville were repre- 
sented by letter. The Societies of Denton and Reed's Cross Roadsj 
did not respond. We now have eleven Societies in our Association;! 
six W. M. S.; four Sunbeam Bands and one Y. W. A.; the Asheboro 
Sunbeam Band having withdrawn to join the Piedmont Association.! 
The Association took as its moneyed aim for the coming year] 
$550.00. The following committee was appointed to approximately 
estimate the proportion of this amount to be given to the variousi 
objects. 

State Missions — Mrs. Z. T. Sharpe and Mrs. S. D. Swaim. 
Home Missions — Mrs. A. K. Wright and Miss Mary Craig. 
Foreign Missions — Miss Roxie Sheets and Mrs. D. E. Webb. 

Louisville Training School — Miss Maude Wall and Mrs. R. I* 
Palmer. 

Time and Place — Miss Roxie Sheets, Miss Mary Craig and Mrs.! 
G. W. Wall. 

Programme — Mrs. S. D. Swaim, Miss Roxie Sheets and Mrs. A. 
K. Wright. 

Assistants to the Vice-President — Mrs. Z. T. Sharpe, Mrs. A. K. 
Wright, Miss Lula Motsinger and Mrs. S. D. Swaim. 

State Missions was discussed by Mrs. S. D. Swaim, of Lexington- 
Home Missions, by Mrs. A. K. Wright, of Lexington; after which 
a letter from Dr. B. D. Gray on Home Mission work was read' by 
Miss Lula Motsinger, of Wallburg. The work of the Louisville 
Training School was discussed by Miss Maude Wall, of Wallburg. 

Letters of greeting and suggestions from Miss Heck were read by 
Mrs. Vann and they were adopted by the Union. 

Prayer by Rev. A. K. Wright. 

Intermission for dinner, 1 hour. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 



At 1:30 o'clock the Vice President called the meeting to order. 
The devotional exercises were led by Miss Mary Craig, of The 
Orphanage, who read the 14th chapter of John, followed by prayer 
by Mrs. S. D. Swaim. 

Report of Committees. 

Foreign Missions $ 225.00 

Home Missions 175. 00 

State Missions 135.00 

Louisville Training School 15.00 

Time and Place. 

Time of Meeting — Thursday before the 4th Sunday in August. 
Place of Meeting — Wallburg. 

The report of the Margaret Home was read by Mrs. R. Lee 
Palmer, of Jersey. 

Foreign Missions was discussed by Miss Roxie Sheets, of Lex- 
ington, after which Dr. Willingham's letter on this subject was 
read by Miss E. Zora Mallard, of Lexington. 



15 

Miss Heck's appeal to the Young Women was read by Mrs. Vann,. 
who also discussed the work the young women are doing and made 
an appeal for the organization of more new Societies during the 
coming year. 

The report of the Sunbeam work was given by Miss Blva Wall 
and Miss Pearl Green gave a brief review of her work as leader 
of Sunbeam Band at Wallburg. 

The address of the day, "Our Missionary Opportunity and How 
to Meet It," was delivered by Rev. A. K. Wright, of Lexington 
to which all the men of the church were admitted. 

The following were subjects for open discussions: 

L "Advantages of Quarterly or Special meetings open to the 
Public," paper prepared by Mrs. T. S. Crutchfield, and read by Miss 
Addie Carlton, of the Thomasville Orphanage. 

II. 'What Should We Do and How Can We Do It?" led by Miss 
Lula Motsinger, of Wallburg, and discussed by Miss Sheets, Miss 
Craig and Mrs. Swaim. 

The following resolutions were adopted: 

(a.) That each Society take a collection once a year to defray 
the expenses of the Association and to pay for extra space in the- 
Associational Minutes in which to report our work. A collection 
was taken amounting to $1.83 for this purpose. 

(b.) That the thanks of the body be expressed to the Jersey 
church and people, especially to the men who provided conveyances 
in which to take the delegates and visitors to and from Linwood 
to the church. 

After a chain of prayer in which many of the ladies participated, 
the meeting adjourned to meet at Wallburg, the Thursday before 
the 4th Sunday in August, 1910. 

This session was in every way encouraging, steady progress be- 
ing the characteristic note of all the Societies. 



Financial Report from August 31, 1908, to August 31, 1909 

Lexington W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 30.00 

Home Missions 18.85 

State Missions 22.85 



Total to Missions , $ 71.70 

Other Objects 34.60 

Total given $ 106.30 

No. of members, 37. MRS. S. D. SWAIM, Pres. 

Thomasville W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 40.17 

Home Missions 41.46 

State Missions 53.47 



Total to Missions $ 135.10 

Other objects 10 . 00 

Total given $ 145.10' 

No. of members, 23. MRS. W. H. ELLIOTT, Pres. 

Orphanage W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 22.65 

Home Missions 18.10 



Total to Missions 
No. of members, . . . 



$ 40.75 

MISS MARY CRAIG, Pres. 



16 



Wallburg W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 22.50 

State Missions 12.75 

Home Missions 23.00 

Total given to Missions $ 58.25 

Other objects 2.45 : 

Total given $ 60.70 

No. of members, 10. MRS. C. M. WALL, Pres. 
Jersey W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 6.10 

Home Missions . 6.26 

State Missions 4.42 

Total to Missions $ 16.78! 

Other objects 43 

Total given $ 17.21 

No. of members, 20. MRS. D. B. WEBB, Pres. 

Total given through W. M. S $ 390.06 

Lexington Y. W. A.: 

Foreign Missions $ 60 

Total given to Missions $ 60 

No. of members, 10. MISS ALVM OWEN, Pres. 
Sunbeam Bands. 

Lexington: 

Foreign Missions $ 11.04 

Home Missions *. 5.56 

State Missions 11.62 

Total to Missions $ 28.22 

No. of members, 34. CLARA TATE, Pres. 
Thomasville: 

Foreign Missions $ 3.13 

Home Missions 15.83 

State Missions 10.00 

Total to Missions $ 28.96 

No. of members, 36. ROBERT COX, Pres. 
Wallburg: 

Foreign Missions $ 5.90 

Home Missions 3.50 

State Missions 6.00 

Total to Missions $ 15.40 

Orphanage 1.20 

Total given $ 16.60 

Total given by Sunbeams $ 73.78 

Grand total given through the W. M. S., Y. W. A. and 

Sunbeam Bands $ 464.44 

MRS. P. S. VANN, 
Associational Vice-President. 
MRS. A. K. WRIGHT, 

Secretary. 



17 



The report was discussed by S. D. Swaim. 
The report was endorsed. 

The committee to nominate the Executive Board of the 
Association reported as follows : K. K. Williams, C. M. Wall, 
E. S. Green, P. S. Vann, Grover Palmer. 

The report was adopted. 

K. S. Green read the report of the Finance Committee. 
TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Receipts. 

State Missions $ 156 . 56 

Foreign Missions 94.72 

Home Missions 102.49 

Education (Ministerial) 106.52 

Ministerial Relief 48.54 

Minute Fund 29.24 

Sunday School Board 9.07 

Buildings 13.05 



Total $ 560.19 

Disbursements. 

State Missions $ 156.56 

Foreign Missions 94.72 

Home Missions 102.49 

Education (Ministerial) 106.52 

Ministerial Relief 48 . 54 

Minute Fund 29.24 

Sunday School Board 9.07 

Buildings 13.05 



Total $ 560.19 



S. H. AVERETT, Treasurer. 

The report was adopted. 

On motion of R. S. Green, C. M. Wall was elected to 
represent this Association in the Board of State Missions. 

On motion of G. W. Miller A. K. Wright was appointed 
a delegate to the Southern Baptist Convention. Alternate, 
S. D. Swaim. 

The report recommending trustees for Liberty-Piedmont 
Institute was read. 

LIBERTY-PIEDMONT INSTITUTE TRUSTEES. , 
The Committee appointed to recommend trustees for Liberty-Pied- 
mont Institute submit the following: J. W. Noell, Chairman, A. 
Johnson, Secretary, C. M. Wall, P. M. Snider, G. W. Wall and D. C. 
Sharp. Respectfully, 

T. S. CRUTCHFIELD, 
D. S. HAYWORTH, 
G. W. MILLER, 

Committee. 

C. H. Teague, G. W. Miller and J. O. Bowers were ap- 
pointed delegates to the Baptist State Convention which- 
meets at Wadesboro. 



18 



Moved and carried that the Clerk be allowed ten dollars 
for his services. 

H. W. Early presented the following resolution which was 
adopted : 

Resolved: That the Liberty Association extend to the members 
of Liberty Church and to the people of the community our heart- 
felt thanks for their hospitable entertainment during the session 
of this Association. 

On motion of R. S. Green, the churches of the Associa- 
tion are asked to send the collections for the different objects 
to Treasurer Walters Durham, Raleigh, N". C. 

A. K. Wright gives notice to the Association that he will 
ask for a change in the Constitution by doing away with the 
office of Treasurer of the Association. 

Adjourned to meet with the Orphanage Church on Sep- 
tember, 1910. 

Dismissed by A. K. Wright. 



PLEDGES FOR 1909-1910. 



CHURCHES. 


State 


Missions. 


Home 


Missions. 


Foreign 
Missions. 


Orphanage. 


Education. 


Ministerial 


Relier. 


Totals. 


Abbott's Creek. . 


$15 


00 


$ 6 


00 


$13 


50 


$25. 


00 


$ 5 


.00 


$ 4 


50 


$ 69 


00 


Center Hill 


6 


00 


3 


00 


7 


00 


6. 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


24 


50 


Denton 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


18. 


50 


4 


00 


3 


00 


50 


50 


Gravel Hill , 


8 


00 


4 


50 


8 


50 


10. 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


37 


00 


Holloways 


20 


00 


7 


00 


22 


50 


20. 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


78 


00 


Jersey 


20 


00 


8 


00 


22 


50 


20. 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


82 


50 


Lexington 


50 


00 


35 


00 


60 


00 


45. 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


210 


00 


Liberty 


5 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 


10. 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


36 


00 


Lick Creek 


10 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


20. 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


62 


00 


Mount Lebanon. 


2 


50 


1 


00 


3 


00 


3. 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


11 


50 


New Friendship. 


10 


00 


6 


00 


11 


00 


20. 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


52 


00 


Orphanage 


55 


00 


35 


00 


40 


00 


75. 


00 


20 


00 


6 


00 


231 


00 


Pine Meeting H. 


25 


00 


10 


00 


27 


50 


25. 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


97 


50 


Reed's X Roads. 


20 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


25. 


00 


3 


00 


3 


50 


86 


50 


Rich Fork 


12 


50 


6 


00 


10 


00 


15. 


00 


4 


00 


2 


50 


50 


00 


Stoner's Grove. . 


10 


00 


6 


00 


7 


00 


10. 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


38 


50 


Summerville . . . 


2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 


2. 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


9 


50 


Taylor's Grove. . 


3 


50 


1 


00 


2 


00 


4. 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


12 


50 


Thomasville .... 


50 


00 


30 


00 


50 


00 


40. 


00 


7 


50 


4 


00 


181 


50 


Wallburg 


55 


00 


30 


00 


55 


00 


65. 


00 


7 


00 


6 


00 


218 


00 


Totals 


387 


00 


213 


50 


406 


00 


455. 


50 


97 


00 


67 


50 


1626 


50 


Reported 1908.. 


408 


00 


215 


00 


446 


25 


531. 


50 


106 


00 


72 


50 


1779 


25 


Reported 1907.. 


387 


50 


205 


00 


427 


00 


463. 


75 


90 


50 


70 


50 


1674 


75 



s^oaCqo 



( sj8;siuih pto 



lflOlOt-OOMC<100LOHHI>l> 
NOOJH (MMHNMCOIOM 



N CO N CO lO 



CXI CN t- CM O 

i— i oo oo nn oo cs 

*# i-l OlO 



OS CM lO 

o eg oo 

C\l CO 



CO 

as , os 

co !oo 



•uopBonpa 



lO H H 



CM CM CO lO 



■sioonos PUT3 



o o 

tH 'CM 



LfJ CM LO 00 



CD CO 

1-1 t» 

00 CO 



•SU0I3STH 
U§I9JO^ 



•suoissih 

9LUOH 



CO O CM 



•suoissih 

9WS 



•S9SU9dX[a 

looqos ^puns 



COCOLOOSLOlOCOlOCO^ 



•SlB^U9ppui 



•gUIJTB(l9U 

puB Suipimg 



rH O 
i-H o 

OO CM 



NKJOI>l> 
CO OS CM tH LO 



O O O LO O LO 
O O CO CO o c- 
i — I i—l CO H 



2 u h h k 

CP O CD 
CD -iJ +j £ ^ 



CD 
10 

O 

w g 



bJD' 



CD CD 
CD 



CD 

f- ■ ^ 2 CD 



S?c3fH 52 1_j CD S o 



>? p 



•dii{Sj8qin9H 


OOMCOt-^MOSOOHOlrJHOlfl 
i—l rH r- It— ICOtHtHt— 1 CO M 


• CO rH rH CO LO © 

• t- CO CO- t- rH rH 

• rH rH rH 


2726 


2702 


2560 




(MHOOTt<HTj<cr>lOC3tDHU5l> 
rH rH rH H H 


• LO rH rH o 00 O 

• t~ CO rt< f- CO 


1587 1 


1641 f 


1557| 




IfliHNlOr ICOLOCOLOCpiOLOOS 
rH tH 


• 00 CO O CO o 

• CO CO CO CO LO 


1012 1 


1 061 1 


1003| 


•ssot; 


■ • • • LO O • O i—l CO rH -co 
• • • • rH • CO • rH 








CO 
00 


as 

LO 

CO 
CO 
CO 


1911 35 1 




©000'* • • rH ■ • • -co • 
rH • • • • • • rH • 


• CO 


OS 


CO CO 
rH rH 


CO 

i 




CO LO 


cqiooooo^co^-*ffs 

rH CO rH rfl 


• rH CO CO 


O 00 
rH 


CO 
CO 


t~ 

LO 


1 80X 




rH 






CO 


rH rH CO CO 


rH 


rH CO rH 


CO rH 


LO 
CO 


tH 

CO 


rH 
CO 


•pepnpxg 


CO 




rH 


rH 


rH 




rH 








rH 


rH rH 


CO 


CO 
CO 


rH 

CO 


•ae^en: Aq 
pessiuisia 


• LO 


t — I LO CO 00 LO 
CO 




CO rH 00 
rH rH 








t~ CO 


00 
CO 
rH 


CO 
rH 


CO 

co 




CO CO O CD 
rH rH rH 




CO O CO 
• rH rH 


CO I> O 

co 


rH CO rH 
rH 


CO rH 
CO CO 


163 1 


LO 
00 
CO 


^H 
CO 
CO 








CO rH CO 




• CO 




rH 






00 


o 

rH 


00 


P9AT809H 


CO H LO 
rH 




rH OS • 




LO rH 








OS CO 


rH 

LO 


CO 
t- 


00 

co 


•rasi}d , ea 


OS CO LO CO 




OS • rH 


CO CO rH 
CO 


rH rH rH 
1— ( 


CO CO 


rH 
© 


LO 
CO 


as 

00 
rH 



0J3 

Sh 

3 O 

© 

03 N 

© o3 
Ph 



+5 d 02 53 

rj 43 CO HH 

111? 

M #53 

- 02 © ,-JT.. 

© © of 

m fi to ffi 



O > W 

1 .a a > 

2 xi o 53 

rH — 1 f-" © 



A 53 13 

n 53 o 

> o 

+ J 02 S 

sal 

1 §1 

5h o 53 



S H £ < P3 <h £ -g § 
O § Eh J H PQ J H ^ gj <j § ^" 



53 

> o 

72 O 

§1 

Eh 

_ u 

r-T © 

II 
02 02 

r?M 
Eh'O* 



^ *h 02 

53 © <S 

, fl o 

^ 03 _£3 



©\S 

a ® 

GO j> 




|—| 02 



4*) 

^ k - jzrj - <X> 

s g « © g t: 



© 

02 02 

O o3 



© "43 6 



© 

o <P 



rt s * 

CP © ■ 



© M 
42 O 



> 

o 

OS 

ja ^ 

,2 a 

o 

© f-,' .5! © -S ^3 id o3 ,rj 

^OfH^pHCCCBEHEH 



fa g © O g aj Jh 



■fa 2 

© 





00 


C— 




o 


o 




OS 


OS 




rH 


rH 










© 


CP 






+J 










o 


O 




a 


ft 




CP 


CP 






fa 


02 


02 


02 














+j 






o 


o 


o 


Eh 




Eh 



looqos 



• o o 


• o 


• o 1a 


• o • 


• O CM 


• 


• ICS rH 


• rH 



•siooqos raoij 



O^OOOLQOOLOt-OlOOCOO 
CO.CO^OOCOCOLO^CO^COO^CO 
CM ^ 



CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM • CM CM CM CM 
HrlHHiHHHH • tH i— I r- I t— I 



PUB S9lIJ9^^n^) 



10NONOH100 
t-OOlOCO.LOlOCXJLO 
tH H lO 



Cxi 



cr> cm cm 



IOOOOOH 
C- LO 00 
^ CO 



saumjoA on; 



H r li— It— It— It- I CQ H r- li—t 



•siooqos jo -on 



H00 005CO«£>Ml>IM(XlH0il0l> 
tH CO Tf< H 



jo jeqranN 



tH CO T)H t— I 



'SJ9qo , Bej i 



t— I CM H H 



02 
H 

o 



02 02 



o o 



Pj CD 

§ % ~ 

o a . « 

CD 02 co fn 

1=3 T 5 2 CI) 
02 ^ 02 W 
w ■ '. 

Q mS^ 

co ^ 



CD 

S 

St 

fl o 

O O 

o 



flj 02 
02 ^ 
re § 



(3 .2 > 

h-1 CD . 

- ! 

n cd q) 

0) -rH 



th" 02 



S3 



cd « 

5S 

IS 

J? 

St 



CD O 

3 o 

► I 

re 

a J 

2 «r 



5 2 a 

3 - & 

^ o « 

S r-J 



CD 

Cu rH ^ 
^>tB 

U co ^ 
. re re 

^ S r> 
g g£ 

a^ 2 

3 - s 

02 co ^ 

d ffi ^ 

CO w 



> £ 

CO O 
2 ® 

£ rO 



CD 



M d 
S CD 

CD 



§1 
CD i- 1 



CD 
Sh 

O 
+j 
02 5 t3 

. M X o 

CD Jh n 
SI J 



a 00 ^ 

CO M g 

CO 02 S 

S O ss 



cd" p _; 
^ > '£ 

£h CO 

O oS ^ 

- CD N 

3 S CD 

CD 'g CD 
5 -S 



CD 
CD 

re r-j 

a 13 

co O ^3 
S ° ^ 



^ dm Q 03 



P3 Q 



^ ffi g N PQ W 

h-; cd o fci ^' pi 



^ • & 

CD CP t 

re co 

rd re . 

« o Th 

>,rd OS 

a . . 



2W 



CD 
CD 

St 

42 O ^ S ^ I 
CD O CD £ 

O CD +J > O 

co CD <p Sh O 



CO 

: d 
. o 

l 



CD 
> 

Q CD 



CD 
> 

o 



cd s t-i ri i_ 

co'S fe •§ ^-d^ 



S O g£ 



22 



CHURCHES, PASTORS AND THEIR POST OFFICES. 



— 



CHURCHES. 



PASTORS. 



POST OFFICES 



Abbott's Creek . . . 

Asheboro 

Center Hill 

Denton 

Gravel Hill 

Holloways 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

New Friendship . . . 

Orphanage 

Pine Meeting House 
Reed's Cross Roads. 

Rich Fork 

Stoner's Grove 

Summerville 

Taylor's Grove 

Thomasville 

Wallburg 



Thomas Carrick 

J. D. Bowen 

S. D. Swaim 


High Point. 

Asheboro. 

Lexington. 


G. W. Henderson 

S. D. Swaim 

S. D. Swaim 

A. K. Wright 

W. J. Laffoon 


Bland. 
Lexington. 
Lexington. 
Lexington. 
High Point. 


Thomas Carrick 

T. S. Crutchfield 

S. D. Swaim 


High Point. 

Thomasville. 

Lexington. 


T. S. Crutchfield 

Henry Sheets 

W. J. Laffoon 

L. W. Harris 

T. S. Crutchfield 

Thomas Carrick 


Thomasville. 
Lexington. 
High Point. 
Eldorado. 
Thomasville. 
High Point. 



CONSTITUTION AND RULES OF ORDER OF LIBERTY 
ASSOCIATION. 



1st. This Association shall be called the Liberty Baptist Ass 
ciation. 

2nd. It shall be composed of the ordained ministers who ai 
members of, and those who m'ay have pastoral charges within tt 
Associational district, and of the three delegates from each churc 
in the district aforesaid. 

3rd. The said delegates before taking their seats shall produc 
letters from their respective churches, showing their appointmei 
as delegates. 

4th. The Associational session shall be held at least once a yea 

5th. The officers shall be Moderator and Clerk and if deeme 
expedient by the Association, a Treasurer likewise. 

6th. The Moderator shall be chosen annually, but the Clerk shaj 
continue in office at the pleasure of the Association. 

7th. The Association shall be clothed with authority only i 
advise the churches touching all things pertaining to their interes 
but shall in no case presume to direct or control them in referenc 
to their own government or internal polity. 

8th. A committee of arrangements, consisting of three member; 
shall be appointed on the first day of each session, to prepare am 
report an order of proceedings; and to suggest topics proper for th 
consideration and action of the Association; and the said con 



23 



(ttee shall report promptly on the morning of the second day of 
3 Association. 

9th. (As amended) Baptist ministers, not members of the Asso- 
ition, or any visiting brother from sister Associations, who may 

present at any session of the body, may, on invitation of the 
dy, take seats and participate in the debates of the Association. 
10th. At each session of the Association there shall be appointed 

Executive Committee of five, three of whom shall constitute 
morum, whose duty it shall be to superintend, and in conjunction 
th the Missionary Boards of the Baptist State Convention of 
>rth Carolina, direct the missionary operations of this Association. 
11th. All committees shall be appointed by the Moderator unless 
tierwise ordered by the Association. 

12th. This Constitution may be altered only at an annual session 
this Association and by a vote of two-thirds of the whole body 
esent. 



RULES OF ORDER. 

list. This Association shall meet punctually each day at the 
Kir appointed, and on the appearance of a quorum, the Modera- 

shall cause the minutes of the preceding day to be read. 
!2nd. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to decide all questions 
I points of order, subject to an appeal from his decision to the 
bsociation. 

[3rd. The Moderator shall be entitled to vote only in case of an 
lual division of the Association. 

[4th. He shall not participate in debate except on points of order, 
less by unanimous consent of the Association, or until he shall 
ve called another member to the chair. 

5th. Members shall in debate, or on rising to make a motion, 
Idress themselves to the Moderator. 

6th. When two or more members rise at the same time, the 
oderator shall designate the person who shall first occupy the 
>or. 

7th. No member shall absent himself from the session of the 
ssociation without its leave. 

8th. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be received 
it to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to post- 
Hie to a day certain, to commit, or to amend, which several mo- 
ans shall have precedence to the order in which they stand here 
•rayed. 

9th. All committees, unless otherwise ordered, shall consist of 
tree members only. 

10th. A committee shall be appointed on the first day of every 
ission to designate ministers to preach during the session of the 
ssociation. 

11th. No motion shall be put to the Association by the Modera- 
»r, unless it receive a second. 

12th. No rule of order shall be rescinded or suspended, unless 
I a vote of two-thirds of the body. 

13th. No member shall speak more than twice on any question 
iless by consent of the Association. 

14th. The Constitution and Rules of Order shall be read publicly 
l the Association on the second day of every session. 



\ 



- MINUTES 

OF THE 

Seventy-Seventh Annual Session 

(seventy-eighth anniversary.) 

OF THE 

Liberty Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

The Thohasville Orphanage, 

'"SEPTEMBER 6, .7 and 8, 1910. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

Moderator — Henry Sheets Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk — Preston S. Vann... .Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer — Steven EL Averitt , . . . . Thomasville, N. C. 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER FOR NEXT SESSION. 

Place for next meeting— Abbott's Creek Church. ~ 

Time for next meeting — Tuesday after the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1911. - j 

To preach the Introductory Sermon — T. S. Crutchfield. Alternate, 
Jeff Lanning. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1910 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

. Seventy-Seventh Annual Session. 

( SEVENTY EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY. ) 
OF THE 

Liberty Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

The THormsviLLE Orphanage, 

SEPTEMBER 6, 7 and 8, 1910, 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

Moderator — Henry Sheets Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk — Preston S. Vann Lexington, N. C. 

Treasurer — Steven H. Averitt Thomasville, N. 



PLACE, TIME AND PREACHER FOR NEXT SESSION, 

Place for next meeting — Abbott's Creek Cburcb. 
Time for next meeting — Tuesday after tbe first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1911. 

To preach the Introductory Sermon — T. S. Crutchfield. Alternate,. 
Jeff Lanning. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1910 



1.1 St OF ORDAINED MINISTERS IN LIBERTY ASSOCIATION, 
SEPTEMBER, 1910. 



W. S. Adderton Denton, N. C. 

Lee Carrick Linwood, N. C. 

T. S. Crutchfield Thomasville, N. C. 

O. A. Keller..., Wallburg, N. C. 

M. L. Kesler Thomasville, N. C. 

M. J. Leach Lassiter, N. C. 

H. Morton Thomasville, N. C. 

J. D. Newton Thomasville, N. C. 

Henry Sheets Lexington, N. C. 

SS. D. Swaim. . . . Lexington, N. C . 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

fo. K. Williams, C. M. Wall, R. S. Green, 

P. S. Vann, P. M. Snider. 



Proceedings. 



Thomasville, E". C, 
September 6, 1910. 
The seventy-seventh annual session of the Liberty Baptist- 
Association met at the Thomasville Orphanage on September 
6, 1910. 

At 11 :00 in the morning, the Introductory Sermon was 
preached by Eev. O. A. Keller. His theme was "Faithful- 
ness."— Eev. 2 :10. 

The Association was adjourned for two hours for dinner., 



TUESDAY — Afternoon Session— 2 :00 o'clock. 

Prayer was offered by G. E. Lineberry. Archibald John- 
son and J. T. Valentine were appointed to read the letters, 
from the churches. 

The delegates from the churches were as follows : 

Abbott's Creek — C. H. Teague, D. S. Hayworth, W. D. Spurgeon, 
Center Hill — C. A. Owen, A. V. Miller, Isaac Yarboro, E. D. Jarratt. 
Denton — W. H. Dickens, J. R. Newsome, J. P. Holloman. 
Gravel Hill— W. A. Strickland, B. I. Sheets. 
Holloway's — B. R. Cross, D. R. Beaublossom, J. A. Carrick. 
Jersey— O. P. Tate, W. C. Roach, W. F. Miller. 

Lexington— W. G. Fitzgerald, G. W. Miller, T. I. Warfford, B. F. 
Ausband. 

Liberty— H. P. May, D. H. Hefler, Gains Furr, N. T. Kindley. 
Lick Creek — John Rogers, N. R. Kinney. 

New Friendship — B. F. Charles, F. Z. Wilson, Lender Newsome 
Orphanage — S. H. Averitt, V. Wilson, Robert Watkins. 
Piney Meeting House — R. K. Williams, Lacy Weston, W. H,. 
Lomax. 

Reed's Cross Roads — D. C. Craver, J. M. Myers, J. W. Massey. 
Rich Fork — Robert Bowen, Thomas H. Small, Hugh Carter. 
Stoner's Grove— B. F. Roach, C. H. Beck, J. I. Warfford. 
Summerville — J. A. Buie, C. B. Wall. 

Taylor's Grove — A. H. Michael, C. L. Bailey, William Loftin. 
Thomasville — L. E. Teague, D. H. Morton, A. Johnson. 
Wallburg — G. W. Wall, C. C. Smith, J. B. Motsinger. 

On motion, Archibald Johnson was instructed to cast the 
vote to elect Henry Sheets, Moderator, and S. H. Averitt, 
Treasurer of the Association. 

On motion, Smith's Grove Church was received into the 
Association. The Association voted to read only those church 
letters presented on the first day of the meeting. 

The following visiting brethren were recognized : E. L.. 



4 



Middleton, C. M. White, T. W. Chambliss, G. E. Lineberry, 
A. L. Betts and J. D. Bowen. 
R. K. Williams read the 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Believing that the Sunday School is one of the greatest factors in 
the salvation of the world in connection with the church, we suggest 
that this Association lay great stress on the Sunday School work. 

Since it is necessary to have our best informed fellowmen as 
leaders and teachers in order to secure the best results in temporal 
things, and realizing the importance of the Sunday School work 
we believe that we should select our best informed and most con- 
secrated fellow Christian workers as officers and teachers in this 
work. 

Therefore, we recommend that our Sunday Schools select the 
best informed and most consecrated Christians available as officers 
and teachers in the Sunday Schools. 

We want consecrated leaders because their lives are set up as 
examples. We want well informed and experienced leaders because 
it is necessary that the lessons be presented in a way to interest 
the students in order to secure the best results. 

Believing that the pastors of the several churches are the in- 
dividual, spiritual advisers of the leaders in all things pertaining to 
the church work and feeling that the Sunday Schools in our rural 
districts are, to some extent, neglected by the pastors, we sug- 
gest that the pastors of the several churches make it convenient to 
get in close touch with the officers and teachers of the Sunday 
Schools in their respective churches. 

We heartily endorse the literature of our Sunday School Board 
,and commend the Biblical Recorder and Charity and Children for 
the light that comes from them each week on the lesson. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. K. WILLIAMS, 
J. T. VALENTINE, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by E. L. Middleton, and adopted 
with a change of the wording of the sentence "The Sunday 
School is the greatest factor in the salvation of the world," 
by inserting "One of" between "'is" and "the". 

On motion, it was agreed to take a special collection for 
Sunday School Missions and the Clerk was directed to pre- 
pare a column for pledges for this object. 

The action of the Liberty Union meeting in making the 
Spring meeting a Sunday School Convention was approved 
i>y the Association. 

Thomas Carrick read the 

REPORT ON THE THOMAS VILLE ORPHANAGE. 

A little more than twenty-five years ago the first meeting of the 
Orphanage Association was held under the memorable Hickory 
"Tree. This tree was surrounded by a brush arbor. This meeting 



5 



was to lay plans and devise means for the building of The Thomas- 
ville Baptist Orphanage. 

From that day until this the work has gone on till now this 
Institution shelters and cares for about 400 orphans. The work 
has grown marvelously. First under the leadership of the lamented 
J. H. Mills for ten years. Then under the management of J. B. 
Boone for ten years more. Brother Boone has also been taken from 
our midst and we mourn our loss. Brother M. L. Kesler the present 
general manager has proved himself a worthy successor of Mills 
and Boone. With the hearty co-operation of the brethren and 
sisters and the blessings of the Lord who can tell what this 
Orphanage is to be in the near future? But we are not to lose 
sight of the fact that there is a demand for food and clothing every 
day in the year and the churches and friends of helpless Orphans 
must constantly rally to their support. As the Orphanage grows 
new needs arise and new obligations must be met. Just now we 
need the Industrial Building for the training of our boys. We 
also need more room that the number of children may be increased 
and that the demands upon us may be met. 

Your Committee would recommend that as far as possible all our 
churches hold a thanksgiving service and take a special collection 
for the Orphanage. We would recommend also that all of our 
Sunday Schools take a collection, at least once a month, for this 
cause. We would urge our churches to make their pledge as large 
as possible to aid in meeting the demands of this growing Insti- 
tution. Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS CARRICK, 

C. A. OWEN, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by Thomas Carrick, J. M. Hil- 
liard, T. W. Chambliss, M. L. Kesler and S. H. Averitt, 
Pledges were taken amounting to $470.00. 

The report was adopted. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee to com- 
plete the program for the order of business : Archibald John- 
son, O. A. Keller, 1ST. E. Teague. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee on Sum 
day School Work: S. II. Averitt, C. M. Wall, G. W. Miller. 

W. G. Fitzgerald and Berry R. Cross were appointed com- 
mittee on Finance : 

By request of the Association, Thomas Carrick preached 
for the night session. 



WEDNESDAY— Morning Session. 

9 :30 to 10 :00 J. D. Bowen conducted devotional exercises. 
At 10 :00 o'clock the Moderator called the Association to 
order. 

The Minutes of the previous day were read and approved-. 



6 

Center Hill, Lick Creek and Taylor's Grove churches 
presented letters and the same letters were referred to the 
committee on Digest of Letters. 

The following visiting brethren were recognized : R. T. 
Vann, Hight C. Moore and F. W. Hancock. 

The committee reported the following Order of Business, 
and the same was adopted : 

Wednesday. 

9:30 a. m. — Devotional exercises. Miscellaneous business. 
10:15 a. m. — Education; Liberty-Piedmont Institute; Ministerial 
Education. 

Afternoon. 

2:00 p. m. — Home Missions. 
3:00 p. m. — Biblical Recorder. 
3:30 p. m. — Temperance. 
4:00 p. m. — Obituaries. 
8:00 p. m.— Our Colleges. 

Adjournment. 

Thursday. 

9:30 a. m. — Devotional exercises; Miscellaneous Business. 
10:15 a. m. — Woman's Work. 
11:00 a. m. — Foreign Missions. 

2:00 p. m— Ministerial Relief. 

It was voted to take fifteen minutes time, as the time al- 
lotted for the report on Temperance, to replace the one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars borrowed to pay for the printing of The 
History of Liberty Association. 

S. H. Averitt read the 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

No question of more vital importance confronts us than the edu- 
cation of our children. It is better that they be educated in a State 
school than in no school at all, but it is much better that they re- 
ceive their preparatory and college training in our denominational 
schools than anywhere else in the world. And we have no excuse 
for failing to patronize our own schools. In the Liberty Association 
we have an institution, the Liberty-Piedmont Institute, that in its 
equipment, its teaching force and its effective and thorough work 
is hardly surpassed by any school of its class in the State. It has 
reached a crisis in its history. It is staggering under a burden of 
debt that must be lifted. Every church in this body ought to find 
joy in helping to set it free from financial bondage and sending on 
its glorious way to serve the denomination and the State. 

Wake Forest College is entitled to our loyalty and our love. Its 
work has been of surpassing value. Our boys should all go there. 

Meredith College is doing a service in uplifting our young woman- 
hood, the value of which no one can measure. It is making no 
profit. Every dollar it earns is expended on the denomination. No 



7 



individual is growing rich off its dividends. The high standard it 
has set makes it an expensive school, but when the quality of its 
work is considered it is the wisest investment a parent can make 
to put his daughter under its care. She gets full value for her 
money. 

On the education board at Wake Forest there are 65 ministerial 
students. These young men are struggling to equip themselves 
for this high calling. In contributing to this cause we are not 
helping the men but the minister. The little lift we give these 
young preachers will yield a rich and ever increasing dividend. 

S. H. AVBRETT, 
A. R. SNIDER, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by S. H. Averitt, Thomas Car- 
rick, Gr. E. Lineberry, Livingston Johnson, Hight C. Moore 
and M. L. Kesler. 

Pledges amounting to $97.50 were taken and the report 
was adopted. 

The report on State Missions not being presented, it was 
voted to discuss the subject without the report, and to insert 
the report in the minutes, without adoption as soon as it is 
received. State Missions were discussed by Livingston John- 
son and M. L. Kesler : 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

(In the absence of a written report for this year, we insert the last 
year's report.) 

The work of State Missions has been emphasized by the Baptists 
of North Carolina to a greater or less degree for the last one hun- 
dred years. 

One of the fundamental objects in view in the organization of 
the Baptist State Convention was that of supplying the destitute 
sections of the State with the preaching of the gospel. This work 
has gone on in its organized form for more than three quarters 
of a century. 

The work of State Missions has not been uniform in its success 
from the beginning. For many years the means and men for car- 
rying on this work were limited and the success of the State Mission 
work was variable. For the last thirty years or more the progress 
has been steady, and the increase in means and missionaries have 
advanced all along the lines until now we have reached the highest 
success in the history of State Mission work. 

The number of missionaries this year is 148; number baptized 
by missionaries last year 2,047; the amount to be raised for State 
Missions this year, $40,000. Yet there is great need to enlarge 
the work. It is estimated that some 600,000 adults in our State are 
unconverted, that is about half of our adult population. We need 
more money and more men to press forward in this work. 

I am not definitely informed as to the work in this Association 
for this year but am sure that good work is being done, but there 
are still many destitute sections that ought to have preaching with 
a view to organizing churches. 

Much has been done but much more needs to be done. The work 
grows upon us year by year. 



8 



Will not the churches of our Association and the churches all 
over the State awake to the importance of the work of State Mis- 
sions. As the State Mission work advances so will all the other 
interests of the Convention prosper. 

T. S. Crutchfield moved to inaugurate a campaign by the 
pastors conferring together, to increase the amounts of the 
collections for the different objects of the Convention and 
the motion was carried. 

Pledges on State Missions were taken amounting to 
$411.50. 

The Moderator appointed the following committees to re- 
port at session of 1911 : 

To Nominate the Executive Board of the Association — O. A. Keller, 
B. I. Sheets, D. C. Craver. 

On Time, Place and Preacher for the Session of 1911 — C. M. Wall, 
J. M. Hilliard, S. H. Averitt. 

On Foreign Missions — Thomas Carrick, N. R. Teague. 

On Home Missions— S. H. Averitt, T. H. Small. 

On State Missions— G. W. Miller, W. G. Fitzgerald. 

On Biblical Recorder — Archibald Johnson, J. T. Valentine. 

On Orphanage — C. M. Wall, Branson Charles. 

On Sunday Schools — J. D. Newton, D. C. Craver. 

On Minister's Relief — J. M. Hilliard, Jeff Lanning. 

On Temperance — Thomas Carrick, P. M. Snider. 

On Obituaries — Berry R. Cross, B. Frank Roach. 

On Woman's Work— T. S. Crutchfield, O. A. Keller. 

On Ministerial Education — S. D. Swaim, R. K. Williams. 

On Sunday School Work in Association — S. H. Averitt, G. W. 
Miller, C. M. Wall. 

Adjourned with prayer by C. M. AVhite. 



WEDNESDAY — 2 :30 p. m. 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator. 
Prayer was offered by B. W. Parham. 
C. M. Wall read the 

REPORT ON THE BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

Any nation, state, body or order to be successful and progressive 
must be well organized, and the chief agency through which this 
unity may be thoroughly established is to have some medium 
through which the body as a whole keep in close touch and sym- 
pathy with the work that the groups and individuals in the body are 
doing. It is the greatest organizing factor known. Now this me- 
dium for the Baptist people in North Carolina is The Biblical Re- 
corder. It has been our chief agency for expression for the past 
seventy-five years. Through it we can reach our people every 
week and in this way promote general harmony and fill them 
with the proper zeal and enthusiasm for our work. The more 







we study and give our attentions to an object, the greater our 
interest in this object will become. Now we should strive and 
have it as one chief aim to place the Recorder in every Bap- 
tist home in the State, so that the people will turn their at- 
tention and thoughts to the work. As they begin to learn what 
we are doing, we will see a new enthusiasm in our people and 
gradually as their interest increases they will fall in line with the 
work and then our principles will advance and success will come 
easier. Now the pastors especially can be influential in bringing 
about these conditions. It should be one great aim and is a duty of 
every pastor to place the Recorder in every home in his pastorate. 
He has or should have the confidence of the people in his church 
or churches and he is the proper person to do this work individ- 
ually. Respectfully submitted, 

C. M. WALL, For Committee. 

C. M. Wall, A. L. Betts, O. A. Keller, Archibald Johnson, 
B. W. Parham, G-. W. Miller and Henry Sheets discussed 
the report and it was adopted. 

The committee on Time and Place reported as follows: 

Time — Tuesday after the first Sunday in September, 1911. 
Place — Abbott's Creek Church. 

Preacher — T. S. Crutchfield. Alternate — Jeff Lanning. 

C. M. WALL, 
J. M. HILLIARD, 
S. H. AVERITT, 

Committee. 

One hundred and fifty dollars was raised to repay the 
money borrowed for the printing of the History of Liberty 
Association. 

C. H. Teague read the 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 

Another year has passed and with its passing some of our num- 
ber have quit their work on earth, and gone to their reward. 

However, none of our Ministerial Brethren or active laymen (as 
reported by the delegates) have been called except Brother J. H. 
Walser, who was a faithful member of Reeds X Roads church. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. MORTON, 
C. H. TEAGUE, 

Committee. 

The report was adopted without discussion. 
T. S. Crutchfield read the 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The scheme of missions outlined by our Lord and Master takes 
in the whole world. The commission to carry the gospel to the 
whole world obligates you and me. If we are not actively engaged 
in the missionary enterprise, we are taking part in a rebellion 
against our Lord's command. 



10 



The place of beginning, the Master said, should be Jerusalem, 
then continuing through Judea, and Samaria, and unto the utter- 
most parts of the earth. Our Jerusalem, Judea, and Samaria are in 
the United States. Are we — you and t— doing what Christ would 
have us to do in conquering and holding our country for Him? 
We bear the name of a Christian nation. But out of a population 
of ninety millions, there are only about twenty millions that are 
members of evangelical churches. This looks as if the work in our 
Jerusalem, Judea, and Samaria is being neglected somewhere. 

And the demand for extensive and persistent evangelization in- 
creases with each year. Imigrants, the most of whom are non- 
Christian, flock to our shores at the rate of a million a year. 
And perhaps twice as many of our own people migrate from one 
section of the country to another and thus are found in new environ- 
ments with no religious influence to bear upon them, in many 
cases; and Baptist influence in these new environments is rarer 
still. The most of this vast and new-made missionary territory 
lies within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention, or in the 
territory where our Home Board is now operating. So we see that 
the responsibility of giving the gospel, as we understand it, to mil- 
lions of people rests upon Southern Baptists. 

I quote the following from a representative of the Home Mission 
Board: "Southern Baptists must take a large part in saving the 
lost of America. We hold the gospel in its purity. Since we have 
so much to give in making good Americans, while at the same 
time we make Christians, we are under the deeper obligation to do 
large things. Because we are more numerous than any other 
Christian body in the South, our obligation is greater than any 
other." 

In recognition of this great obligation, we have begun to do 
more than in former days, and God has shown His approval by 
abundantly blessing our efforts. The labors of the missionaries 
of our Home Board have been blessed with a larger fruitage than 
that shown by the reports of similar mission boards. Our Home 
Board reported last year 27,426 baptisms and 52,910 additions^ to 
churches through the labors of missionaries supported wholly or 
in part by it. No other mission board reported results one-half 
as large as these. And no home mission board in America, so far 
as has been ascertained, had results more than one-third as large, 
though several expended four times as much in the work. 

The receipts of the Board increase each year now, and the in- 
crease in receipts is fully equalled by an increase in additions to the 
membership of our churches as indicated above. This year the 
Southern Baptist Convention is asking for $400,000 to be raised 
for the work committed to it. Of this amount $26,000 is apportioned 
to our State. We ought to raise every cent of it, for we are well 
able to do it, and the work demands it. 

Your committee recommends: 

1. That our pastors preach upon the magnitude and importance 
of Home Missions to each of their churches at least once a year. 

2. That each church take at least one regular collection for this 
object each year, and that special effort be made next year to in- 
crease the amount of our contributions to this object to something 
like comport with the amount given to Foreign Missions. 

3. That pastors endeavor, by their own personal efforts or through 
some member of the church appointed for the purpose, to place a 
number of copies of The Home Field in each church. 



11 



4. That churches and pastors be encouraged to make a large 
use of the Home Board's informing tracts and sample copies of 
The Home Field, both of which are free for the asking. 

The address of the Home Mission Board is No. 723 Austell Build- 
ing, Atlanta, Ga. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. S. CRUTCHFIE'LD, 

For Committee. 

After the report was discussed by Livingston Johnson, 
pledges were taken amounting to $218,75., and the report was 
adopted. 

The Association was adjourned to meet at 8 :00 o'clock 
to-night. 



Evening Session. 

The Moderator called the Association to order at 8 :0© 
p. m. and prayer was offered by F. W. Hancock. 

R. T. Vann delivered a forceful address on Education. 

Archibald Johnson offered the following resolution, and 
it was adopted: 

Whereas, a movement is to be inaugurated at the Baptist State 
Convention in Hendersonville to raise $150,000 for Meredith College. 

Resolved, That we heartily commend the movement and pledge 
our earnest efforts in its behalf. 

F. W. Hancock made a short talk in behalf of Oxford 
Seminary. 

The following were elected delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention : C. M. Wall, G. W. Miller, S. H. Averitt. 

C. M. Wall was elected to represent the Association in the 
State Board of Missions. 

Archibald Johnson was elected a delegate to the Southern 
Baptist Convention, and alternate Henry Sheets. 

Pastor Holmes, of the Thomasville Methodist Church, 
was recognized and welcomed among us. 

Jeff Lanning was appointed to conduct devotional exercises 
at 9 :00 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

Adjourned with prayer by O. A. Keller. 



THURSDAY — Morning Session. 

9 :00 a. m., Devotional exercises were conducted by Jeff 
Lanning. 



12 



The Moderator called the Association to order at ten 
o'clock a. m. Prayer by R. T. Vann. 

Temperance was discussed by J. M. Hilliard, F. W. Han- 
cock. 

THE REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Since intemperance is one of the greatest, if not the greatest 
evil of the times, and since there is a determined effort on the 
part of the friends of intemperance to invade our territory by 
establishing near beer saloons, which are often blind tigers with 
thousand of eyes, and by shipping whiskey and other intoxicants 
in unlimited quantities into our territory; and in view of the fact 
that North Carolina has an excellent prohibition law, and because 
there is a sentiment abroad that prohibition does not prohibit, we 
recommend that the Baptists of this Association stand by our officers 
and encourage them in every way possible in the enforcement of our 
present prohibitory laws; and further, that we encourage, our 
people not to vote for any man who is not in favor of law enforce- 
ment. Respectfully submitted, 

O. A. KELLER, 

A. JOHNSON, Committee. 

The above report was adopted. 

On motion, the Clerk was instructed to have this report 
printed in the county papers. 
Archibald Johnson read the 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

The Liberty Association has been wonderfully blessed by the 
work and influence of the Woman's Missionary Societies within 
its bounds. Not only has a goodly sum of money been raised for 
the various objects; but the mission spirit has been greatly stimu- 
lated in every section where these agencies have been established. 

Formerly the organized effort of our women for the promotion 
of the Lord's Kingdom was looked upon with some disfavor. Here 
and there were brethren, and even churches that looked with 
suspicion upon this work, but happily the sentiment in favor of 
Missionary Societies has rapidly changed until there is hardly 
a vestige of the old time senseless prejudice left. 

The smile of the Lord has rested signally upon the consecrated 
labor and sacrifice of our Baptist women. Their work in the State 
Convention has come to be a tremendous factor in our missionary 
operations throughout the State, and our mission boards, State, 
Home and Foreign, are leaning more and more upon the contribu- 
tions of our sisters. 

No church that fosters a true Woman's Missionary Society can 
fail to feel the missionary impulse that it invariably produces. 
It is a great awakener. It stirs to life and activity the dormant 
missionary spirit, and leads the way to larger things for the whole 
church. 

We look with high hope for gracious results from our Woman's 
Work in the years to come. The Sunbeam bands that naturally 
Spring to life in the atmosphere of our Missionary Societies mean 
much for the future. The children breathe the breath of missions 
from their mothers, and when they grow up into manhood and 
womanhood will feel the weight of the Christians obligation. 



13 



We would put on record our earnest approval of what our women 
are doing, and commend them and their gracious work to every 
church within our bounds. Respectfully submitted, 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, 

P. S. VANN, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by Archibald Johnson, Henry 
Sheets, O. A. Keller, H. Morton, Livingston Johnson. 
The report was adopted. 
O. A. Keller read the 

FINANCIAL REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association met 
with the Orphanage Society at 9:30 a. m., September 7, 1910. 

The following reports will show the contributions from the dif- 
ferent Societies during the year: 



Lexington W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 25.65 

Home Missions 94.45 

State Missions 25.00 



Total to Missions $145.10 

Other objects 21.85 



Total contributed $166.95 

Thomasville W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 48.46 

Home Missions 36.20 

State Missions 64.29 



Total for Missions $ 148.95 

Other objects 5.00 



Total contributed $153.95 

Orphanage W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 16.75 

Home Missions 17.86 



Total contributions % $ 34.61 

Wallburg W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 11.05 

Home Missions . .' 11.40 

State Missions 17.15 



Total contributed $ 39.60 

■Jersey W. M. S.: 

Foreign Missions $ 3.75 

Home Missions 4.00 

State Missions 7.09 



Total contributed to Missions $ 14.84 

Other objects 18.30 



Total contributed .„,.,,.. $ 33 . 14 



14 

Lexington Y. W. A.: 

Foreign Missions $ 2.00* 

Home Missions 1.60 



Total contributed $ 3.60* 

Thomasville Y. W. A.: 

Foreign Missions $ 3.63 

Home Missions 5.35- 

State Missions 65 



Total contributed $ 9.63' 

Lexington Sunbeams: 

Foreign Missions ....$ 1.65 

Home Missions 4.00 

State Missions 6.50' 



Total contributed $ 12.15 

Thomasville Sunbeams: 

Foreign Missions ... .$ 2.42' 

Home Missions 6.51 

State Missions 4.29' 

Amount in Treasury 68 



Total contributed ..$ 13.90 

Wallburg Sunbeams: 

Foreign Missions $ 7.92' 

Home Missions 4.60 



Total contributed $ 12.52 

Reed's X Roads Sunbeams: 

Foreign Missions $ 65 

Home Missions 65 

State Missions 60 



Total contributed $ 1.90 



Grand total contributed through the W. M. S., Y. W. A. and 

Sunbeam Bands $ 481.95 

RESOLUTIONS. 

The following resolution was adopted: - 

Resolved, That we miss the presence of our faithful brother,. 
Robert S. Green, and we pray that he may soon be restored to 
health. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, the Board of Trustees of the Orphanage urge the neces- 
sity of a church building for the Orphanage to be erected on its 
grounds ; be it 

Resolved, That we the churches of the Liberty Association under- 
take to raise not less than $500.00 during the next year, the 
amounts to be apportioned among the churches by a committee 
of three to be appointed by the Moderator. S. H. Averitt to he. 1 
chairman of said committee. 



♦ 



15 



The Moderator appointed the following as the committee^ 
to make this apportionment : S. H. Averitt, C. M. Wall, GL. 
W. Miller. 

Archibald Johnson read the following: 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

Our old. ministers who have worn themselves out in the service- 
of the Master are entitled to our sympathy and support, and sym- 
pathy without support is an empty thing. We urge every church 
at some Sabbath near the happy Christmas times to send up a 
Christmas gift for the benefit of these faithful soldiers of the Cross. 

On motion, it was agreed to hold the next Union meeting 
at Eeed's Church. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That we heartily thank the Orphanage and the sur- 
rounding community for the excellent entertainment we have . 
received, and the faithful attendance and the excellent conduct in 
j the Association by the children of the Orphanage. 

The committee nominated the following members for the 
| Executive Board : K. K. Williams, C. M. Wall, R. S. Green, 
!P. S. Vann, P. M. Snider. 

S. H. Averitt submitted the following 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Receipts. 

State Missions $ 81.75 

Foreign Missions 38.24* 

Home Missions 59.41 

Education (Ministerial) 69.73 

Ministerial Relief 48.98 

Minute Fund 30.83 

Liberty-Piedmont Institute 25 . 00 



Total received $ 353.94 

Disbursements. 

State Missions $ 81.75 

Foreign Missions 38.24 

Home Missions 59.41 

Education (Ministerial) 69.73 

Ministerial Relief „ 48.98 

Minute Fund 30.83 

Liberty-Piedmont Institute 25.00 



Total disbursed -, $ 353 . 94 



The report was received. 

The committee nominated G. W. Miller and M. L. Kesler 
trustees of Liberty-Piedmont Institute, and they were elected.. 
Moved and carried, that the Clerk be allowed ten dollars 



1 6 



for his services and that he is instructed to have five hundred 
•copies of the Minutes printed. 

The Clerk was directed to put an advertisement of Liberty- 
Piedmont Institute on the last page of the Minutes. 

G. W. Miller read the 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Our Foreign Mission Board is engaged in doing mission work! 
on the following fields, viz: Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Africa,! 
Japan and China. 

At our Convention in Baltimore last May the Foreign Missioni 
Board reported 246 missionaries, 467 native helpers, 114 of these 
being Ordained Ministers. 

There were 3,223 baptisms on' our mission fields last year; making 
a total membership of 19,239. Our contributions to Foreign Missions 
last year was $501,058.84. Our plans for this year are to give $600,- 
000 for Foreign Missions, and with the blessings of God we surely 
should not give less. 

There seems to be a great awakening among all christian denomi- 
nations on the subject of Foreign Missions. There must be a cause 
for this; let us notice a few things that would seem to indicate; 
a reason for this revival of the spirit of Foreign Missions: 

1st. Never before in the history of the world has there been such 
an opening for the spread of the gospel. The doors of every nation 
are wide open, and the "Macedonian call" is ringing in our ears from 
every quarter of the globe. Even old Spain has recently made a 
successful effort to open her doors and give religious liberty to her 
people, and that in the face of all the opposition that could be pro- 
duced by the "powers of darkness," vested in the Vatican at Rome. 
Surely this is naught but the hand of God writing the doom of 
papacy on the wall. 

2nd. Then there was never before so many men and women who 
are ready to go to the foreign field. In all our colleges and semi- 
naries to-day there are a host of consecrated young people, whose 
hearts have been touched with the fire from off the altar of God, 
and they are saying "Here am I, send me." This is a call to us — 
a call from the heathen — a call from the missionary ready to go, 
and a call from God. 

3rd. The wonderful success of our missionaries on the field is 
another strong incentive to us to increase our efforts. More bap- 
tisms this year on the foreign field than ever before; all our little 
churches overflowing with anxious hearers, and many being turned 
away for want of room — turned away from hearing life-giving mes- 
sages of Jesus Christ! 

Every foreign field is calling for more men: "Pray ye the Lord 
of the harvest that he will send forth laborers into his harvest." 
And also, let us pray that He may use us. As the conditions are 
now — with a world-wide open door — the missionary saying "Here 
am I" — God saying "Go into all the world" — the heathen saying, 
"Come over and help us" — there is nothing for us to do, but to go 
•or disobey God. "If you love me, ye will keep my commandments." 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. W. MILLER, 

For Committee. 



17 



The report was discussed by G. W. Miller, K. T. Vann, 
J. M. Hilliard. 

Pledges were taken amounting to $401.50. 
Report was adopted. 



REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S WORK OF THE LIBERTY 
ASSOCIATION. 



j The fourth annual session of the Woman's Missionary Union of 
the Liberty Association met with the Orphanage Society at Thomas- 
iville, September 7, 1910. On account of some scarlet fever in the 
Ivicinity of Wallburg, it was decided that this meeting should be 
Iheld in conjunction with the Liberty Association, 
i Mrs. P. S. Vann, the Associational Vice-President, called the 
meeting to order and all joined in singing "Worship the King." 
Mrs. Vann read the fifth chapter of 1st John and offered prayer. 
! Miss Sallie L. McCracken was asked to act as Secretary of the 
Association. 

j Mrs. M. L. Kesler, being detained at home by sickness, the ad- 
jdress of welcome was delivered by Miss Elva Wall, of the Orphan- 
age Society. Mrs. Vann responded in behalf of the Union, in the 
absence of Miss Motsinger who had not arrived. 

The roll was called and delegates from the following Societies 
responded: W. M. S. of Lexington, Jersey, Orphanage, Thomasville, 
and Wallburg; also Y. W. A. of Lexington. We now have in our 
Association six W. M. S., two Y. W. A. and five Sunbeam Bands. 
Mrs. J. D. Newton reported the organization of a Sunbeam Band 
at Rich Fork. 

The delegates gave reports from the Societies after which the 
Vice-President made her report. 

Mrs. T. S. Crutchfield read a paper on State Missions. Mrs. 
Vann read a statement from Rev. Livingston Johnson concerning 
contributions to State Missions, urging that State Mission Day be 
observed in our Societies. 

Nothing being prepared on Foreign Missions, a paper on Home 
Missions was read by Miss E. G. Hillyard, of Lexington. Attention 
was called to missionary charts displayed on the board that would 
be very helpful in the study of Home Missions. These were sent 
by Dr. Gray, suggesting that the women take more interest in the 
work of Home Missions. 

How to maintain Societies after Organization, a paper sent by 
Miss Mary Johnson, of Thomasville, was read by Miss Annie Hall. 

Mrs. Vann called special attention to four important points men- 
tioned by Miss Johnson necessary to the maintenance of a progres- 
sive Society. 

The following committees were appointed: 

Time and Place— Mrs. W. H. Elliott, Mrs. J. K. Hankins and Miss 
Luella Snider. 

Program — Misses Sallie L. McCracken, and Addie Carlton, Mrs. 
J. D. Newton and Mrs. W. H. Elliott. 

The meeting adjourned at eleven o'clock to hear Rev. Livingston 
Johnson's address on State Missions before the general Association. 



18 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 



The Vice-President called the meeting to order at two o'clock and 
read a part of the fifteenth chapter of « John, after which all present 
joined in repeating the Lord's Prayer, led by Mrs. F. S. Lambeth, 
of the W. M. S. of the Thomasville Methodist Church. 

The following assistants to the Vice-President were appointed: 
Mrs. J. D. Newton, Mrs. W. H. Elliott and Mrs. J. K. Hankins. 

The Y. W. A. work was then taken up and a paper, Larger Service 
in The Local Church, Larger Service Looking Towards the Training 
School, was read by Miss Elva Wall. Miss Louise Turnley, of Lex- 
ington, gave a sketch on Our Work for the Year. Mrs. Vann read 
some clippings from Mrs. J. Yates Killian and Miss Briggs relating 
to the study of Missions, and emphasized the importance of the 
Mission Study Classes. Several classes were reported for the year 
just closing. Some of the books used by these classes were: The 
Frontier, Servants of the King, Sunrise in the Sunrise Kingdom, 
and Uganda or the White Man of Work. 

A paper, What the Sunbeams are Doing and Their Possibilities 
for Future Usefulness, was read by Miss Maude Wall. 

Miss Isabel Williams' paper, How to Keep up Interest in Sunbeam 
Societies, was read by Miss Laura Godwin. Mrs. J. D. Newton 
spoke of the importance of organizing the children into Sunbeam 
Bands, and urged that special attention be given to this phase 
of Qur work. A chain of prayer was offered, in which many of the 
Ladies joined, asking the guidance in selecting the proper Sunbeam 
Leader. 

A paper on Personal Service was presented by Mrs. DeWitt 
Morton, of Thomasville. 

Miss Louise Turnley offered a resolution of thanks to the Orphan- 
age Society for the entertainment during the Association, which 
was adopted by the Society. . J 

The Secretary read greetings from Miss Heck to the Union. Plans 
for holding Missionary Institutes were explained by Mrs. Vann. 

The Meeting was thrown open and several members mentioned 
briefly some good they had gotten from attending this meeting. 

The committee on Time and Place made the following report: 

Place: Reed's Cross Roads Church. 

Time: Fourth Wednesday in August, 1911. 

The report was adopted. 

After singing "God be with you till we meet again" the meeting 
was closed with prayer. 



19 



PLEDGES FOR 1910-1911. 





















■ 
















•A 




n 




o 


<D 
b£ 




c 




z. 








CHURCHES. 




3 






br. i 




s 








~ ■- 








$ m 

~ DO 




2 

A 




c 












3 








u — 

X'% 


£i 


c 




— 




H: 1 




~ 




Abbott's Creek. 


$15 


00 


% 6 


00 


$13 


50 


$25. 


00 


% 5 


00 


$ 4 


50 


$ 69 


00 


Center Hill. . . . 


6 


.00 


3 


00 


7 


00 






1 


50 


1 


.00 


18 


50 


Denton 


10 


.50 


5 


00 


10 


00 


18. 


50 


4 


00 


q 


00 


51 


00 


Gravel Hill .... 


8 


.00 


4 


50 


8 


00 


10. 


00 


1 


50 


3 


.00 


35 


00 


Hoiloway's .... 




AA 


7 
1 


ao 

lAJ 


99 
ZZ 


r A 

ou 


20. 


00 


5 


00 


o 


.50 


78 


00 


Jersev 


22 


.50 


8 


00 


22 


50 


90 


no 


Q 

o 


00 


4 


.00 


85 


00 


Lexington 


50 


.00 


35 


00 


60 


00 


50. 


00 


10 


00 


1 A 


AA 


215 


00 


Liberty 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


12 


00 




00 


•5 


00 


2 


.00 


36 


00 

uu 


Lick Creek. . . . 


10 


.00 


6 


00 


20 


00 


20. 


00 


5 


00 


3 


.00 


64 


00 


New Friendship 


12 


50 


6 


.00 


11 


00 


20. 


00 


o 


00 


2 


.00 


54 


50 


Orphanage .... 


55 


.00 


35 


.00 


40 


00 


75. 


00 


20 


00 




.50 


232 


50 


Piney Meet'g H. 


25 


.00 


10 


00 


27 


50 


25. 


00 


5 


00 


5 


.00 


97 


50 


Reed's X Roads 


15 


.00 




.00 


20 


00 


20. 


00 


3 


00 


4 


.00 


69 


00 




12 


.50 


! 


00 


10 


00 


1 8 

AO . 


00 


4 


00 


2 


.50 


53 


00 


Smith's Grove. 
Stoner's Grove . 


5 


.00 


2 


00 


3 


00 






2 


00 


1 


.00 


13 


00 


10 


.00 


6 


.00 


10 


00 


11. 


00 


3 


00 


2 


.50 


42 


50 


Summerville . . 
Taylors Grove. 


2 


.00 


1 


.25 


2 


50 


9 

6 . 


AA 

uu 






1 


.50 


o 
y 


Zo 


2 


.50 


1 


.00 


2 


00 




1 


00 


1 


.00 


7 


50 


Thomasville . . . 


65 


.00 


35 


.00 


50 


00 


45. 


00 


7 


50 


5 


.00 


217 


50 


Wallburg 


60 


.00 


30 


.00 


50 


00 


80 


00 


7 


00 


7 


.00 


234 


00 


Totals 1910 


411 


.50 


218 


75 


401 


50 


470 


00 


97 


50 


73 


.00 


1681 


75 


Totals 1909 


387 


.00 


213 


.50 


406 


00 


455 


50 


97 


00 


67 


.50 


1626 


50 


Totals 1908 


408 


.00 


215 


.00 


446 


25 


531. 


50 


106 


00 


72 


.50 


1779 


25 


Totals 1907 


387 


.50 


205 


.00 


427 


00 


463 


75 


90 


50 


7 m 


.50 


1674 


75 



•diqsjoqraejVT 



Mt-rl^NCiHOt-NNOlO^tCOTfOait- 
(St>MMO)-*«9L'»MTH0305lON(SI>HMQK5 
tH H iH tH tH tH tH CO rH rH tH rH 



ir5t-ON01NC005HH05O0)(NNNL'3O0500 
rH 



•ssoq 



MHHNIMHNH 



H H H • N CO H 



passrrasiQ 



CO OJ H rH « OS ^ 



P9AI909-JJ 



•siHspd'eg 



H CO M O t 1 - CO 00 



o o 



CP ^ 



73 cu S> 

73 ^ 1-3 1 

s sg 

S « <i 

H CQ »J 



o 
Ph 

O .73 

W) £ 
S * 

m g 

<fi o 



M cp 



. O 

5 a 

o 

Si +-> 

m 02 

> C 

02 



02 K 



T— I 

CP o 

73 O , CP 
> Ph S S 

oj «5 > 

S <D bn oa 
CP -2? a3 
° E3 -S fi 



2 ^ 

O Q 

C3 .73 
02 



1 1 £s 

ft g > 03 



S3 

S 8 



CP > 



>> CP 

alls 



H 

O Hi PU m Q D Eh 



. . . K. " . . . ^3 

o a 



02H^ 
P 1-3 Hi <j 



O 73 

^ S3 S 

,£5 Q) CP 

<JoQ 



|l 



CP 

bJD cp 
crj cp X 



CP .2h 



jh o ; ^ cp ?_ 

§ & m O B M 



o 

dfflHlJjj^b'pLHtfoicQw 



63 ^P"3 



S3 « 



03 ^ ^ 



•SIB10X 



•pun^ 



£§3§gS:££g§Sg :gg :gg§ 3 £ £ S 



1 



g 3 3 



g§§ £ S S 



3££ 



Ill 



*J 9 Il 9 H 
( SJ8^SIUIH PIO 



g§§gg§§§§§£§3§g§§s§§£3^ 



s g s s 



•siooqos Pub 

S9S9HOO 



: g § S 



•suoissih 



MMOONW'*NOH<Nt>OOOI> 
tH T-HrHCqC^OOT-lT-Hi-^^C^THrH 



ill! 



eraoH 



•suoissth 



1 



5 £ 



5 3 



•sasuedxg 
looqos iCepuns 



•siE^aappui 



g£ 



!S § g 



5 £ 
ill 



S3? 



•§ui.ired8H 
ptre guipimg 



g£ 



s s s 



H H H 1— I H N r-l iH y— I <M i— I t— I iH M H 



111 

i-l iH tH 

o o o S 

!! 



H Eh 



tooips 
•sasuadxa 



■siooqos raoij 
•eoirepuanv 

sqjiiOM 



t-LO<iDLOi>-CNicoc<icc> 
CO cq ^ 

6*9- rH 



OOt-100NOOOO'*NOW010 
CN1 CO 



N N N « N N N 



© N (M N <M OS N 



00 iOS 
!LO 

!co 



J_L_ 



CO |C0 
rH rH 



rH CM 
o OS 
CO rH 



10 o o co o o o 
rH CO t—h ■H -1 



O <X> O 

lo lo o lo 

<M CM 



OS 



•A\i , ejqrc in 
saninxoA jaqumjsi 



•siooips 
jo aeqran^ 



HHr-MH 



h a oo 

00 | CO OS 

IN H M 

cm cm <m 



jo aeqranjsi 



o as oo oo co ia 

CO LO CD OS jO lO CM 

rH tH © rH 

|<M CXI CO 



•sjBqoisej, 

piTB SJ80IJJ0 



02 

OO 
H Ph 

M P 



CO OO CO 00 ; O C- <M 



^ o 



5*1 



CP 

g> ©•£ 

m i-s K 
P H P5 



;>>53 o 

3 W £ S ? 3 
« p- .S bJ3 » ffi 

p* © o > 

SP hh* -P 53 
*P -Ho2 



© 53 
2 CC 



£ pi « o S P 

- a . © a) 

53 CD 
02 = * 



£ H 

£ o 

Eh Eh 
3 ° 

Ph Oh 

Ph Q 

^3 

02 <d 



p?-; CO 
O 



LO 

• 73 • 
©COM 

h 5 O 
o > £Ph 

TO ^ Eh 

r £ I 

O O bT to 

.£ h g "Pi 

£s~S5 

<m 2 q> «r 



1° 
2 ° 

eg 



S - fen 
t> P 



cp 

> s 



o 

OJO +J +J 

S pf © 
,P* P 



0) 

C3 -I- 1 

a £ 
<, o 



a> ^ ^ p- 



CP 

r-H CP 

sf 1 ■ g 3 i 

go 

^ cS S ffi ! 



LO • • - „ 

CP © 



« CP 



CP £ 



02 <J 



pq 



P O 



S3 <l 
-OS** 

8 If I & 

^ slT Eh £ 

sill 

Ph . ^ 
H>" d ffi ^' 



» CP 



® 5h .2 BQ 



• o 

gpT> : 

> O co 
Pi OX) pj o 

j .5 o £ 

S3 

P 



^ ^ o 



25 

pc qq rt d h pc 



^ • 

CP • 
CP • 

S-i 

O 53 



°«! : ; 

ffi ^ . CP 

!> 

o 



CP o 

p H 

cS . 
^3 P 
O o 



PS 

02 03 



W) 




fH 


© 




© 










ci 


p 




r-3 
+J 




P 




© 




a 






O 


6 


& 


<i 




d 



•o . P P3 • ^ S 
P cp "43 J O 53 



© 

p a, 



^ c3 
^ P — ( fe 

o 8 2 S o 

•S P P 5 
<!GQOffi 



© bJO © M 

r 1 rr? (D H 



: ■ m 
• § ' 2 

CP P 

m-rt ©^j 

^j3P^OPhP3P3 02 02PEh 



• o 

© rH 

> 05 

o :rH 



S 2 © ^ s a 



O 53 b H 

" QQ I 

QQ 



CO M 

P- 1 03 _ 

^ Sgg.cc 

03 5^ § |o 
P> 02 !Eh 



OS 00 

o o 

OS OS 



23 



CHURCHES, PASTORS AND THEIR POST OFFICES. 



CHURCHES. 



Abbott's Creek 

Center Hill 

Denton 

Gravel Hill 

Holloways 

Jersey 

"Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

New Friendship 

Orphanage 

Pine Meeting House. . 

Reed's X Roads 

"Rich Fork 

Stoner's Grove 

Summerville 

Taylor's Grove 

Thomasville IT. S. Crutchfield. 

Wallburg jO. A. Keller 

Smith's Grove S. D. Swaim 



PASTORS. 



Thomas Carrick . 

S. D. Swaim 

D. Swaim 

W. Henderson. 

S. D. Swaim 

O. A. Keller 

A. K. Wright 

W. J. Laffoon 

Thomas Carrick . 

O. A. Keller 

T. S. Crutchfield. 

S. D. Swaim 

J. M. Hilliard. . . . 
T. S. Crutchfield. 
Henry Sheets . . . 

W. J. Laffoon 

Jeff Lanning 



POST OFFICES. 



High Point. 

Lexington. 

Lexington. 

Pon Tap. 

Lexington. 

Wallburg. 

Lexington. 

High Point. 

High Point. 

Wallburg. 

Thomasville. 

Lexington. 

Raleigh, Route 5. 

Thomasville. 

Lexington. 

High Point. 

Denton. 

Thomasville. 

Wallbui g. 

Lexington. 



CONSTITUTION AND RULES OF ORDER OF LIBERTY 
ASSOCIATION. 



1st. This Association shall be called the Liberty Baptist Asso- 
ciation. 

2nd. It shall be composed of the ordained ministers who are 
members of, and those who may have pastoral charges within the 
Associational district, and of the three delegates from each church 
in the district aforesaid. 

3rd. The said delegates before taking their seats shall produce 
letters from their respective churches, showing their appointment 
as delegates. 

4th. The Associational session shall be held at least once a year. 

5th. The officers shall be Moderator and Clerk and if deemed 
expedient by the Association, a Treasurer likewise. 

6th. The Moderator shall be chosen annually, but the Clerk shall 
continue in office at the pleasure of the Association. 

7th. The Association shall be clothed with authority only to 
advise the churches touching all things pertaining to their interest, 
but shall in no case presume to direct or control them in reference 
to their own government or internal polity. 

8th. A committee of arrangements, consisting of three members 



■ 

shall be appointed on the first day of each session, to prepare and! I 
report an order of proceedings ; and to suggest topics proper for thai 
consideration and action of the Association; and the said com- J 
mittee shall report promptly on the morning of the second day off 
the Association. 

9th. (As amended) Baptist ministers, not members of the Asso-i 
ciation, or any visiting brother from sister Associations, who may J 
be present at any session of the body, may, on invitation of the J 
body, take seats and participate in the debates of the Association. j| 

10th. At each session of the Association there shall be appointed I 
an Executive Committee of five, three of whom shall constitute- 1 
a quorum, whose duty it shall be to superintend, and in conjunction | 
with the Missionary Boards of the Baptist State Convention of I 
North Carolina, direct the missionary operations of this Association. Jr 

11th. All committees shall be appointed by the Moderator unless I 
otherwise ordered by the Association. 

12th. This Constitution may be altered only at an. annual session;!. 
Of this Association and by a vote of two-thirds of the whole bodyj| 
present. 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1st. This Association shall meet punctually each day at the hour 
appointed, and on the appearance of a quorum, the Moderator 
shall cause the minutes of the preceding day to be read. 

2nd. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to decide all questions 
or points of order, subject to an appeal from his decision to the 
Association. 

3rd. The Moderator shall be entitled to vote only in case of an 
equal division of the Association. • 1 

4th. He shall not participate in debate except on points of order, 
unless by unanimous consent of the Association, or until he shall 
have called another member to the chair. 

5th. Members shall in debate, or on rising to make a motion, 
address themselves to the Moderator. 

6th. When two or more members rise at the same time, thej 
Moderator shall designate the person who shall first occupy the 
floor. 

7th. No member shall absent himself from the session of the 
Association without its leave. 

8th. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be received 
but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to post- 
pone to a day certain, to commit, or to amend, which several 
motions shall have precedence to the order in which they stand 
here arrayed. 

9th. All committees, unless otherwise ordered, shall consist of) 
three members only. 

10th. A committee shall be appointed on the first day of every 
session to designate ministers to preach during the session of the 
Association. 

11th. No motion shall be put to the Association by the Moderator, 
unless it receive a second. 

12th. No rule of order shall be rescinded or suspended, unless 
by a vote of two-thirds of the body. 

13th. No member shall speak more than twice on any question 
unless by consent of the Association. 

14th. The Constitution and Rules of Order shall be read publicly 
in the Association on the second day of every session. 



Liberty - piedmont Institute. 



This school was established in 1903 by the Liberty Association. 
Learning of the good the school was doing the Piedmont Association 
decided, in 1907, to unite with the Liberty Association in supporting 
the school. Ever since it was established it has done excellent 
work. 

The school is located at Wallburg, N. C, a beautiful little village 
in Davidson County, eight miles from Winston-Salem^ and ten miles 
from High Point. The village is 960 feet above the sea level. 
With its pure water and splendid climate there are few sections 
if any, in the State where the people enjoy better health. 

Purpose, 

The school was established to sow the seeds of truth in the hearts 
and minds of the young, causing them to develop into men and 
women, who will be the stay of the church and State. Liberty- 
Piedmont aims to bring out the best there is in the student, and to 
aid him or her in becoming a power in the development of our 
country. The Trustees elect teachers who have had advantages 
of the courses in our best Colleges', such as Meredith and Wake 
Forest, and who have rich experience in their chosen profession. 
The school aims to broaden and enrich life by cultivating an ap- 
preciation of the best things, to bring out the best in the student. 

Health. 

The health of the student is considered ^,s of primary importance. 
The locality being healthful and the sanitary conditions excellent, 
there is no reason why students, who do not violate the laws of 
health should be sick. In case of sickness, however, the services 
of a good physician, who lives near the Main Building, can he had 
at a reasonable cost. 

Board. 

Students and teachers" sit at the same table. The tables are 
supplied with wholesome, palatable food prepared in the best man- 
ner. The students are advised to take their meals in school, how- 
ever, young men who desire can make arrangements for Club board- _ 
ing. The price of board is thus reduced to actual cost. Should 
any one desire to "batch", suitable rooms can be had. Such oppor- 
tunities are offered so that there is no excuse for any ambitious 
young man or woman who wants an education to fail in accom- 
plishing such. / . • 

To make a success of school life requires hard work and" all stu- 
dents who come to our school are expected to do their best. We 
want working students, we do not want loafers. 

For further information write to 

LIBERTY - PIEDMONT INSTITUTE, 
Wallburg, N. C.